Courses

<< back

BIO-102   Biology of Human Disease3 credits

Corequisites: BIO-102L

Emphasis on pathogenic organisms and human immune responses. This is a laboratory course designed for students not majoring in biology. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

BIO-102L   Biology of Human Disease Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites: BIO-102

The laboratory course for BIO-102.

BIO-106   Readings in Biology1 - 3 credits

Individually assigned readings, followed by written reports or seminars, covering classical, current, and semi-popular literature on biological topics.

BIO-108   Human Genetics3 credits

Genetics and genetic technology as applied to humans. Topics include classical (Mendelian) inheritance, genes and gene-expression inherited disorders, analysis of pedigrees, sex determination, biological basis of gender, genetics of behavior, gene therapy, and genetic privacy.

BIO-109   Biology of Reproduction3 credits

Corequisites: BIO-109L

This course provides an overview of major topics in reproductive biology that include sex differentiation, male and female anatomy, environmental factors that influence reproduction, contraception, and the hormonal control of different stages of reproduction such as puberty (sexual maturation), reproductive cycles, pregnancy and childbirth. The course primarily focuses on human reproduction but other animal groups will be discussed when appropriate. NOTE: When the laboratory (BIO-109L)is offered with this course, it is a required corequisite course; the combination of the lecture and laboratory will fulfill the laboratory requirement of the human biology and natural science minors.

BIO-109L   Biology of Reproduction Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites: BIO-109

This laboratory course may or may not be scheduled along with the BIO-109 lecture. When the laboratory is scheduled with the lecture, it is a required corequisite course.

BIO-129   Murder, Medicine, & Magic3 credits

Corequisites: BIO-129L

A study of ethnobotany - the uses people have made of plants. Topics include the uses of plants in various cultures for foods, fibers, shelter, beverages, medicines, rituals, and other ends. Emphasis will be placed on basic botanical principles (such as taxonomy, anatomy, evolution, chemistry), and the human needs (physiological, behavioral, cultural) that plants satisfy. NOTE: When the laboratory (BIO-129L) is offered with this course, it is a required corequisite; the combination of the lecture and laboratory will fulfill the laboratory requirement of the natural science minor.

BIO-129L   Murder, Medicine, & Magic Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites: BIO-129

This laboratory course may or may not be scheduled along with the BIO-129 lecture. When the laboratory is scheduled with the lecture, it is a required corequisite course.

BIO-140   Idaho Natural History3 credits

Corequisites: BIO-140L

Natural history, flora, fauna, and ecological relationships of the local area. Three lectures and one four hour laboratory weekly. This course is designed for students not majoring in biology.

BIO-140L   Idaho Natural History Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites: BIO-140

The laboratory course for BIO-140.

BIO-145   Drugs, Brains, and Behavior3 credits

Corequisites: BIO-145L

This course explores fundamental neuroscience concepts with an emphasis on how the nervous system is affected by injury, toxins, aging, and disease. Societal implications of recent research will be discussed, and a component of the course will be devoted to investigating ethical issues that arise from these discoveries. Note: When the laboratory (BIO-145L) is offered with this course, it is a required corequisite course.

BIO-145L   Drugs, Brains, and Behavior Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites: BIO-145

The laboratory course for BIO-145.

BIO-159   Cellular Basis of Human Physiology3 credits

Corequisites: BIO-159L

This is the first course in the core curriculum for Human Performance, Exercise Physiology and Health Sciences majors. The course will prepare students for the Human Anatomy and Physiology sequence (BIO224-225). Course topics will cover fundamental concepts including biomolecule structure and function, energy metabolism (cellular respiration), structure and function of cells and interaction between cells. Not intended for Biology majors or Health Science majors who plan to enter graduate programs requiring Cell Biology or Biochemistry (e.g. Physician, Physician's Assistant or Pharmacy). Such students should enroll in the BIO 201 (or 210)-202 sequence.

BIO-159L   Cellular Basis of Human Physiology Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites: BIO-159

This is the lab component for BIO 159. Emphasis will be on scientific problem solving, including collection, analysis, and interpretation of biological data.

BIO-198   Biology Colloquium.5 credits

A seminar series highlighting contemporary research in biology. This course is intended to introduce students to a wide range of fields within the biological sciences. Course can be repeated for up to 2 credits (4 semesters).