Courses

MUS-001   Concert/Recital Attendance0 credits

A requirement for all music majors and minors. Attendance for all music majors and minors is required at concerts and recitals. Several professional and ensemble evening concerts are scheduled during each semester. Recital labs meet for 45 minutes each week. S/U grades only.

ART-100   Drawing and Composition3 credits

A study of the principles and elements of composition using an extensive selection of drawing media. Primary focus is on black and white.

KPHE-100   Varsity Athletics1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

According to season. Activity class offered to those who qualify for intercollegiate athletic teams: varsity volleyball, basketball, baseball, soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

BUS-100   Introduction to Business3 credits

An introduction to the private enterprise system and the component areas of business including: marketing, management finance, production, business and government relations, organized labor, and the ethical and social responsibilities of business organizations.

ENG-100   College Writing3 credits

Prerequisites:Placement

A course in the essential elements of critical thinking and rhetorical strategies necessary for effective college writing. The course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses extensively on revision.

PHY-100   The Universe3 credits

This course focuses on the development of the science of astronomy through the use of observations, theories, and models. Topics may include astronomical instruments, the night sky, the solar system, stars and galaxies, or cosmology.

MUS-100   Music Fundamentals2 credits

A study of the rudiments of music including notation, vocabulary, writing music and forms. Emphasis on the ability to read and understand music. Not open to music majors.

PSY-100   General Psychology3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts and problems of psychology. Students are expected to acquire familiarity with the practice of a scientifically based psychology from a variety of perspectives, both academic and applied.

SOC-100   Introduction to Sociology3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts used in the analysis of societies and human group behavior through consideration of the scientific method in: sociology, culture and society, social stratification and human groupings, social change, and collective behavior.

POE-100   Essentials of American Government3 credits

An introduction to the institutions of the American government and political system, including political parties, the media and interest groups.

REL-100   Introduction to World Religion3 credits

An introduction to both the variety of religious traditions across the world and the academic study of religion. This course examines the foundations, histories, and contemporary dynamics of world religions. A critical emphasis is placed on contemporary issues in world religions.

ATH-101   Cultural Anthropology3 credits

An introductory course in cultural anthropology. A comparative study of communities and small scale societies that lie on the periphery of the industrial world, focusing on their life, economic/political institutions and religious/artistic traditions, using various models of interpretation.

ART-101   Basic Painting3 credits

Instruction in the basic principles of painting composition. Emphasis will be on the individual's creative development through the exploration of both opaque and transparent media.

FYS-101   First Year Seminar3 credits

This course introduces each student to the rigors of academic writing through participation in the processes central to that endeavor: analytical reading, critical thinking, and well-reasoned writing. The seminars offer students the opportunity to become part of a vibrant community of learners while focusing on a specific topic that poses challenging intellectual questions. Seminar topics vary each year and from seminar to seminar. All first-year students entering the college with fewer than 28 credits must complete FYS-101. Most students will complete the course during the first semester. FYS-101 serves only first-year and qualifying transfer students and is not available to other students.

GOL-101   Physical Geology3 credits

Corequisites:GOL-101L

Physical geology is the study of the materials the earth is made of and the processes that occur both on and beneath the surface. The course heightens awareness of how the earth continually changes, the rates of geologic change, and the finite character of the earth's resources. The course is designed to help students to develop their own views of how human activity impacts geologic processes, and how geologic processes affect human activity.

MUS-101   Aural Skills I2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

The primary goal of aural skills is instant, one-to-one mapping of sound to symbol and symbol to sound.The musicianship training in the course enables musicians to develop 'seeing ears' and 'hearing eyes' by emphasizing strategies for accurate and expressive reading, improvising, singing, and dictation using elementary rhythms and diatonic pitch materials in treble, bass and C clefs. Keyboard skills in the class require sight reading, improvisation and technical studies of all major and minor scales. Three hours per week.

PSY-101   Introduction to Psychological Science3 credits

This course provides a general introduction to research methods in psychology. Topics covered will include understanding the concepts and techniques necessary for conducting psychological research, understanding the types of research designs most commonly used in psychology and the strengths and weaknesses of each, understanding how to propose and conduct research in psychology, analyzing data obtained from research and communicating research findings to others in writing and through oral presentation. The course includes readings and lectures about research and performing experiments.

SPE-101   Basic Public Speaking3 credits

Theory and practice in the fundamental skills needed to create and deliver effective speeches before an audience.

LAS-101   Introduction to Latin American Studies1 credit

An introduction to Latin American Studies through a variety of formats, including films, speakers, and discussions. Themes vary annually. Pass/Fail only.

EDUSPA-101   Spanish for Educators I1 credit

Develops a springboard for beginning Spanish language skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Offers a basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary within a sheltered, communicative approach. Introduces students to Hispanic and Latino cultures. Course conducted in Spanish.

ESL-101   English As a Second Language I3 credits

A course sequence for nonnative speakers to develop further proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing English. Includes phonetics, idioms, lexical expansion, grammar review, and aspects of contemporary culture. ESL-101 is taught concurrently with a composition course in the English Department.

MS-101-102   Introduction to Military Science1 credit

An introduction to ROTC, military customs and traditions, benefits of Army Service and basic military skills. Laboratory consists of participation in leadership exercises, introduction to land navigation, adventure training, rifle marksmanship, and basic First Aid.

GOL-101L   Physical Geology Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:GOL-101

This is the laboratory course for GOL-101.

KIN-102   First Aid and CPR1 credit

A study of first aid procedures designed by the American Red Cross. The course focuses on CPR and rescue breathing techniques as well as emergency care and prevention of injuries and illness. Healthy lifestyle and personal safety awareness will be included. Certification is required for credit.

BIO-102   Biology of Human Disease3 credits

Corequisites:BIO-102L

Emphasis on pathogenic organisms and human immune responses. This is a laboratory course designed for students not majoring in biology. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

MUS-102   Aural Skills II2 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-101

A continuation of MUS-101 in the development of intermediate to advanced skills in sight singing, ear-training and keyboard, adding all the diatonic harmonies, modulation to closely related keys, and more rhythmic complexities. Keyboard skills in the class require application of threoretical concepts to playing chord progressions, Adult level II sight reading, melodic transposition and performance of Classical era sonatina by memory. Three hours per week.

EDUSPA-102   Spanish for Educators II1 credit

Extends Spanish-language speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills introduced in Spanish for Educators I. Emphasis will be on expanding vocabulary and fundamentals of grammatical structure within a sheltered, communicative approach. Focus will be on Hispanic and Latino cultures within the school and community environment. Course conducted in Spanish.

ESL-102   English As a Second Language II3 credits

A course sequence for nonnative speakers to develop further proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing English. Includes phonetics, idioms, lexical expansion, grammar review, and aspects of contemporary culture. ESL-102 is taught concurrently with a composition course in the English Department.

BIO-102L   Biology of Human Disease Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-102

This is the laboratory course for BIO-102.

ART-103   Ceramics3 credits

A basic introduction to pottery and sculptural forms in clay, using both hand and wheel methods. The course includes instruction in a variety of glazing and firing techniques, such as stoneware, raku, and low fire glazing.

MUS-103   Music Theory I3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A study of the fundamentals of music theory (scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, rhythm) leading to a preliminary study of diatonic harmonic relationships and voice leading practices in tonal common practice music.

EDUSPA-103   Spanish for Educators III2 credits

Designed to build on the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills developed in Spanish for Educators I & II. Vocabulary will be expanded through an analysis of language structures through cultural and literary readings. Discussion of themes related to children and young adult Spanish language literature. Course conducted in Spanish.

BIO-104   Introduction to Human Anatomy3 credits

A general study of the anatomy of the human body with emphasis on the neuromuscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems as they relate to activity. This course is not designed for students majoring in biology, exercise science, nursing, health science, or related pre-health professional programs. The course is designed for physical education majors.

MUS-104   Music Theory II3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-103

A continuation of the study of traditional diatonic and chromatic harmonic and melodic practices of common practice music.

MAT-105   Algebra3 credits

Prerequisites:High school Algebra 2 or equivalent or placement.

Intensive study of algebra, graphs and functions. The emphasis will be on gaining college level proficiency in algebra and understanding the graphs and properties of linear and polynomial functions. Topics include solving equations, linear equations, inequalities and systems of equations. This class is intended to prepare students for MAT-111, MAT-112, MAT-123.1, and MAT-221.

PHY-105   Introduction to CAD2 credits

A beginning level survey of the theory and practice of computer drafting and engineering graphics. No previous CAD experience is required but students should have some basic understanding of science and mathematics as well as some experience as a computer user. Pass/fail only.

BIO-105   Introduction to Physiology of Exercise3 credits

Corequisites:BIO-105L

The study of the physiology of the human body systems, including cardiovascular, muscular, nervous, metabolic and respiratory, and the affects of exercise on these systems.

PSY-105   Explorations in Psychology3 credits

This course is a survey of the field of Psychology using primary and secondary source material. Examples of topics covered include, among others, the latest in research on thinking, motivation, learning, and social psychology. Specific topics covered change yearly based on current findings in psychology. This course is recommended for those interested in exploring psychology or pursuing a minor but will not replace PSY-100, General Psychology for the major.

BIO-105L   Introduction to Physiology of Exercise Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-105

This is the laboratory course for BIO-105. Laboratory experiences will explore scientific inquiry, methods, measurement and statistics related to stress, metabolism and exercise.

BIO-106   Readings in Biology1 - 3 credits

Individually assigned readings, followed by written reports or seminars covering classical, current, and semi-popular literature on biological topics.

HSC-106   Readings in Health Science1 - 3 credits

Individually assigned readings, followed by written reports or seminars covering classical, current and semipopular literature on topics in health science.

ART-107   Digital Imaging3 credits

This course focuses on the creation of concept-driven digital images. Course will also cover design and composition through the manipulation of digital images using Adobe Photoshop as a creative tool.

BIO-108   Human Genetics3 credits

Genetics and genetic technology as applied to humans. Topics include classical (Mendelian) inheritance, genes and gene expression inherited disorders, analysis of pedigrees, sex determination, biological basis of gender, genetics of behavior, gene therapy, and genetic privacy.

ART-108   Introduction to Web Design3 credits

This introductory studio course will address visual and functional design in websites. Topics such as design, usability, navigation, hyperlinks, text and images will be covered through studio assignments using Adobe Creative Suite.

BIO-109   Biology of Reproduction3 credits

Corequisites:BIO-109L

This course provides an overview of major topics in reproductive biology that include sex differentiation, male and female anatomy, environmental factors that influence reproduction, contraception, and the hormonal control of different stages of reproduction such as puberty (sexual maturation), reproductive cycles, pregnancy and childbirth. The course primarily focuses on human reproduction but other animal groups will be discussed when appropriate. NOTE: When the laboratory (BIO-109L) is offered with this course, it is a required co-requisite course; the combination of the lecture and laboratory will fulfill the laboratory requirement of the Human Biology and Natural Science minors.

BIO-109L   Biology of Reproduction Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-109

This laboratory course may or may not be scheduled along with the BIO-109 lecture. When the laboratory is scheduled with the lecture, it is a required co-requisite course.

HIS-110   Western Civilization to 10003 credits

An investigation of the history of Western civilization exploring selected topics related to human freedom and the liberal arts educational tradition.

THE-110   Play Reading and Discussion1 credit

This courses will broaden students' awareness and knowledge of dramatic material available and expose them to different genres and styles of stage plays (including plays chosen for the current theatre season). Students will read and discuss classical as well as contemporary plays assigned. The group discussion dynamic promotes the analytic process of breaking down a script and the sharing of ideas. May be repeated for credit.

STS-110F   Effective Studying3 credits

A course designed to challenge students to learn and apply efficient and effective studying techniques. This course will provide numerous success strategies and resources. Topics covered in the course include: transitioning, time management, goal setting, memory, active reading strategies, effective note taking, test taking, problem solving, critical thinking, communication, writing, diversity, relationship and resources.

HIS-111   Western Civilization to 18003 credits

An investigation of the history of Western civilization exploring selected topics related to human freedom and the liberal arts educational tradition.

MAT-111   Contemporary Mathematics3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-105 or equivalent course with minimum grade of C or placement.

A course designed to explore some of the great ideas in mathematics, and to discover the power of mathematical thinking in everyday life. Topics include counting techniques, infinity, geometry, shape and space, chaos and fractals, and decision science.

MUS-111   Introduction to Music Literature3 credits

A course in elementary appreciation and enjoyment of music literature designed for students outside the Music Department. No previous knowledge of music is needed.

FRE-111   French Language & Culture I4 credits

Semester-sequenced beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing French, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

FRE-111REV   French Grammar & Phonetics Review1 credit

Prerequisites:FRE-111 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

A systematic review of the most challenging elements of first semester French using a different set of instructional materials and formats from those employed in FRE-111. This course provides students with an opportunity to preserve, reinforce, and enhance their mastery of newly acquired skills before beginning their second semester in the language.

HIS-112   World Civilizations to 18003 credits

An investigation of the comparative history of selected World historical civilizations focusing on topics related to human freedom and the liberal arts educational tradition.

MUS-112   Introduction to World Music3 credits

This course surveys the music of prominent world cultures and identifies the purpose and function of music within these cultural settings. Traditional music is the primary focus of the class, although the concept of changing contemporary traditions is explored. No previous music experience is necessary.

REL-112   New Testament Introduction3 credits

A survey of the books of the New Testament in relation to their socio-historical context within Jewish and Hellenistic culture.

FRE-112   French Language & Culture II credits

Prerequisites: FRE-111 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Semester-sequenced beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing French, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

MUS-113   Music of Love, Death & All the Rest3 credits

A music appreciation course that introduces music concepts and explores human themes through a variety of music literature.

THE-115   Introduction to Theatre3 credits

Appreciation of the live theatre event through a survey of its dominant philosophy, principles and practice. Supplemented by historical perspectives, reading representative plays and access to the production experience.

MUS-115   Beethoven: Music, Context, & Myth Making3 credits

In this course students study the life and music of Ludwig van Beethoven. Students gain a detailed understanding of Beethoven by viewing his life through various perspectives, including biographical studies, Beethoven's letters, and popular modern media. Students also learn to assess source materials and are introduced to the process of myth making. This course is designed for non-musicians, but students with a background in music will also benefit from taking the course.

MUS-116   Mozart: Music, Context, & Myth Making3 credits

In this course students study the life and music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Students gain a detailed understanding of Mozart by viewing his life through various perspectives, including biographical studies, Mozart's letters, and popular modern media. Students also learn to assess source materials and are introduced to the process of myth making. The course is designed for non-musicians, but students with a background in music will also benefit from taking the course.

POE-120   International Politics3 credits

A survey examination of the actors and issues in global politics. Emphasis is placed on conceptual, analytical, and theoretical foundations of the field.

ART-120   Jewelry Making1 - 1 credits

This studio course will introduce students to jewelry design and construction using metal and other materials.

MUS-121   Sinfonia1 credit

Large string ensemble performing works for string orchestra from the Baroque through 20th century repertoire. This group may be augmented by winds. The Sinfonia will serve as the core ensemble when collaborating with chorus and soloists to perform choral masterworks.

GER-121   German Language & Culture I4 credits

Semester-sequenced beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing German, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

GER-121rev   German Grammar & Phonetics Review1 credit

Prerequisites:GER-121 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

A systematic review of the most challenging elements of first semester German using a different set of instructional materials and formats from those employed in GER-121. This course provides students with an opportunity to preserve, reinforce, and enhance their mastery of newly acquired skills before beginning their second semester in the language.

MUS-122   Concert Band1 credit

Open to all students with high school band experience. A wide variety of music is rehearsed and performed in two concerts. (December and May).

GER-122   German Language & Culture II4 credits

Prerequisites:GER-121 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Semester-sequenced beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing German, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

MUS-123   Early Music Ensemble0.5 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A recorder ensemble specializing in Renaissance and early Baroque consort music.

CHE-124   Forensic Science2 credits

Corequisites:CHE-124L

This course is designed for Crime in Society minors and students not majoring in the natural sciences. This course is a study of the science and technology used in the analysis of physical evidence. Topics may include: the properties of matter and the scientific method, drug analysis, soil analysis, chromatography, and DNA fingerprinting. Six hours lecture weekly.

MUS-124   Jazz Ensemble1 credit

Two hours of rehearsal weekly and public performance of the best in jazz ensemble literature. Open to all students who possess adequate technique and experience.

CHE-124L   Forensic Science Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:CHE-124

Required laboratory course for CHE-124. Three 3 hour laboratories weekly.

ART-125   Introduction to Raku Ceramics3 credits

A studio course exploring basic ceramic techniques, pottery design, and the Japanese quick fire method of Raku.

MUS-125   Chamber Ensemble0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission and audition

Small organizations on a less formal basis such as string trios and quartets, woodwind ensembles and brass. Chamber Singers is a highly select vocal ensemble that specializes in a cappella choral literature from the Renaissance through the 21st century. Auditions take place the first week of classes in fall term. Students must enroll for three consecutive terms (fall, winter, and spring); contact the instructor for eligible exceptions. Members are responsible for the purchase of ensemble performance attire. This course is offered for 1 credit in the fall and spring semesters and for 0.5 credits in the winter term.

MUS-125   Chamber Ensemble - Strings0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission and audition

See MUS-125 for more information.

MUS-125   Chamber Ensemble - Winds0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission and audition

See MUS-125 for more information.

MUS-125   Chamber Ensemble - Singers0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission and audition

Singers prepare music for performances on and off campus, including the annual Spring Break tour. See MUS-125 for more information.

MAT-125   Data Analysis and Statistics3 credits

Prerequisites:Meet the critieria of the Math placement guide

An applications-oriented approach to data analysis and statistics. Topics may include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression. The course will also cover linear inequalities and interpreting functions with emphasis on their graphs. Applications in business, economics, natural sciences and the social sciences. Students who have received credit for a Calculus course or AP Statistics may not take this course for credit.

MUS-126   Chorale1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

The College of Idaho Chorale is the college's oldest select choral ensemble, and enjoys a long tradition of musical excellence in the Pacific Northwest. This large, mixed-voice ensemble prepares choral literature of varying periods and styles, and aims to enrich the campus and community through music specifically composed for large ensembles. Auditions take place the first week of classes in fall term. Students must enroll for three consecutive terms (fall, winter, and spring); contact the instructor for eligible exceptions. The Chorale may tour with the Chamber Singers during Spring break. Members are responsible for the purchase of ensemble performance attire.

ATH-128   Understanding Spirit in Art and Culture3 credits

This course will examine a variety of cultural groups where artistic, spiritual, and cultural experience are integrated or woven into the fabric of life as a whole. It will focus on Native American and other cultures where ritual, art, and daily life are not compartmentalized. The course will also include cross-cultural case studies and field trips.(Cross-listed as ART-128)

ART-128   Understanding Spirit in Art & Culture3 credits

This course will examine a variety of cultural groups where artistic, spiritual, and cultural experience are integrated or woven into the fabric of life as a whole. It will focus on Native American and other cultures where ritual, art, and daily life are not compartmentalized. The course will also include cross-cultural case studies and field trips.(Cross-Listed with ATH-128)

MUS-128   Vocal Jazz Ensemble1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

The College of Idaho Vocal Jazz Ensemble is a highly select vocal ensemble that specializes in Vocal Jazz Music with an emphasis on jazz improvisation. Singers and the accompanying rhythm section instrumentalists prepare music for performances on and off campus, including the annual College of Idaho Invitation Vocal Jazz Festival and an annual tour. Auditions take place the first week of classes in fall term. Students must enroll for three consecutive terms (fall, winter, spring); contact the instructor for eligible exceptions. Members are responsible for the purchase of ensemble performance attire.

PSY-128   Human Sexuality & Intimacy3 credits

This course presents the collected theories and data on human sexuality and intimacy. The concepts of gender and sex will be discussed as will the psychology of relationships. The course will also cover current knowledge of patterns of human intimacy and sexual behavior.

BIO-129   Murder, Medicine and Magic3 credits

A study of ethnobotany - the uses people have made of plants. Topics include the uses of plants in various cultures for foods, fibers, shelter, beverages, medicines, rituals, and other ends. Emphasis will be placed on basic botanical principles (such as taxonomy, anatomy, evolution, chemistry), and the human needs (physiological, behavioral, cultural) that plants satisfy. NOTE: When the laboratory (BIO-129L) is offered with this course, it is a required co-requisite; the combination of the lecture and laboratory will fulfill the laboratory requirement of the natural science minor.

BIO-129L   Murder, Medicine and Magic Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-129

This laboratory course may or may not be scheduled along with the BIO-129 lecture. When the laboratory is scheduled with the lecture, it is a required co-requisite course.

ART-130   Introduction to Design3 credits

A lecture and studio experience providing a conceptual basis for organizing both two- and three-dimensional space. Issues of line, color, shape and form will be explored through a variety of media.

POE-130   Global Issues1 credit

This course considers select global issues that currently challenge the international community. Each class session will cover a different issue and look at the debates surrounding them. Often referred to as "transnational issues," or issues too vast and complex for a single country to resolve, the course topics include global population trends, water scarcity, oil supplies, global food production, climate change, drug trafficking, human trafficking, internet freedom, immigration, refugee crises, nuclear proliferation, religious extremism, terrorism, superpower rise and decline, and other topics. This non-lecture course will emphasize student-driven discussion based on set of common readings. This course is open to all students.

SOC-130   A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again: David Foster Wallace and the Sociology of Entertainment3 credits

In the 1990s and 2000s, fiction author David Foster Wallace published a series of essays on Americans’ efforts to entertain themselves. The essays consider topics such as television consumption, state fairs, talk radio, and luxury cruiseliners. Challenging, provocative, and funny, Wallace’s essays explore rich sociological questions about what drives us to be entertained and how entertainment choices impact our thoughts, identities, and relationships with other people. Students will read and discuss selections from Wallace’s work, and the course will culminate in a project that allows students to analyze an entertainment of their own choosing.

MUSAP-130   Applied Music0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Personalized private lessons on an instrument or in voice. Requires a minimum of three hours of practice weekly in addition to 30 minutes of instruction for each unit of credit. More practice may be required at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Extra fee.

SPA-131   Spanish Language & Culture I4 credits

Semester-sequenced beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

SPA-131REV   Spanish Grammar & Phonetics Review1 credit

Prerequisites:SPA-131 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

A systematic review of the most challenging elements of first semester Spanish using a different set of instructional materials from those employed in MFL-131. This course provides students with an opportunity to preserve, reinforce, and enhance their mastery of newly acquired skills before beginning their second semester in the language.

SPA-132   Spanish Language & Culture II credits

Prerequisites:SPA-131 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Semester-sequenced beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication

MUS-133   Class Voice1 credit

Group study of the basic techniques and repertoire for the singing voice. This class is a prerequisite for MUSAP-130, Applied Voice, and is offered for beginning level students. May be substituted for one credit of MUSAP-130.

MUS-138   English and Italian Diction for Singers1 credit

A phonetic study of English and Italian applied to singing. Includes transcription of these languages using the International Phonetic Alphabet and an introduction to vocal literature written in the language being studied.

MUS-139   French and German Diction1 credit

A phonetic study of French and German applied to singing. Includes transcription of these languages using the International Phonetic Alphabet and an introduction to vocal literature written in the language being studied.

BIO-140   Idaho Natural History 3 credits

Corequisites:BIO-140L

Natural history, flora, fauna, and ecological relationships of the local area. Three lectures and one four hour laboratory weekly. This course is designed for students not majoring in biology.

THE-140   Stagecraft4 credits

Study of principles, techniques and materials involved in scenery construction and stage lighting. Lab linked to production.

BIO-140L   Idaho Natural History Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-140

This is the laboratory course for BIO-140.

CHE-141   General Chemistry I3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-105 or appropriate Math Placement scores

Corequisites:CHE-141L

A perlustration of general chemistry designed for all chemistry and other science majors. Emphasis is placed on atomic and molecular structure, chemical periodicity, descriptive organic chemistry, stoichiometry, properties of matter, and thermochemistry. Six hours of lecture and laboratory weekly. This course is not generally suitable for non-science majors seeking to fulfill a core requirement unless they have a strong high school background in chemistry and mathematics

CHE-141L   General Chemistry I Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:CHE-141

Required laboratory course for CHE-141.

CHE-142   General Chemistry II3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-141 and CHE-141L

Corequisites:CHE-142L

A continuation of the study of general chemistry including equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid/base chemistry. Six hours of lecture and laboratory weekly.

CHE-142L   General Chemistry II Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-141 and CHE-141L

Corequisites:CHE-142

Required laboratory course for CHE-142.

BIO-145   Drugs, Brains and Behavior3 credits

This course will explore fundamental neuroscience concepts, with an emphasis on how the nervous system is impacted by injury, toxins, aging, and disease. Societal implications of recent research will be discussed, and a component of the course will be devoted to investigating ethical issues that arise from these discoveries. NOTE: When the laboratory (BIO-145L) is offered with this course, it is a required co-requisite course.

BIO-145L   Drugs, Brains, and Behavior Laboratory1 credit

This is the laboratory course for BIO-145.

KPHE-150   Physical Education Activity (First 6 weeks of semester)1 credit

A wide variety of basic instruction activity classes to encourage participation and skill development in individual and team sports at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. Typical offerings include aerobic dance, ballroom dance, ballet I and II, jazz dance I and II, choreography practice, rhythmic and movement skills, badminton, basketball, body conditioning, bowling, golf, jogging, judo, racquetball, rock climbing, kayaking, shooting, skiing, soccer, softball, swimming, scuba diving, life guard training, volleyball and weight training.

BUS-150   Business Computer Applications3 credits

An introduction to research, analysis and communication skills using information technology. This course is designed to offer life skills that all students can utilize through proper understanding and application of information technology. Current software programs will be taught to support problem-solving skills. All students, regardless of major, are encouraged to enroll.

CSC-150   Computer Science I: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming4 credits

Prerequisites:Any of MAT-1xx (Applied Calculus), MAT-151, or MAT-152 or placement. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

An introduction to fundamental principles of computer science. A brief introduction to computers, including data representation and storage and digital computation. Program design and implementation skills are developed using a high-level language. Topics may include fundamental programming constructs (e.g., functions, branching, looping), algorithm design, data abstraction, recursion, and object-oriented programming.

GOG-150   Physical Geography3 credits

This course will examine major natural systems within our physical environment: climate, vegetation, soils, hydrology, and landforms. Emphasis will be given to analysis of the processes and environmental interactions that shape these systems. Students will develop skills in the collection of both historical and primary data; the utilization of geographic models to explain processes; the complexity and application of maps and mapmaking techniques; examining GIS output as an analytical tool for solving location problems in different scientific fields.

POE-150   Poverty in Africa & Asia3 credits

This course will introduce students to the nature and causes of poverty in some of the world's poorest countries. Examples of some successful poverty alleviation policies will be included.

PHI-150   Critical Thinking3.00 credits

A course in making and breaking arguments. Students will develop their abilities to identify, assess and construct arguments. The course will cover fallacies and both deductive and non-deductive arguments. Students will explore the question of whether moral arguments present a special philosophical problem.

MAT-150   Applied Calculus: A Modeling Approach4 credits

Prerequisites:Meet the critieria of the Math placement guide

An introductory course in differential and integral calculus, useful for work in the natural sciences and the social sciences, with a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing and mathematical modeling skills. Topics may include functions of one or more variables, differentiation, integration, and applications, including an early exposure to differential equations and initial value problems, some introductory vector analysis and linear algebra, and techniques of estimation. This course is designed to be suitable both for students with no prior experience of calculus and for students with some AP calculus experience.

KIN-151   Personal Fitness1 credit

A course of study dealing with the development of a personalized fitness program in which both health and skill-related fitness components are included. Stress management, nutrition, exercise precautions and equipment are also emphasized. Students develop self assessments and individualized fitness programs. Individual labs are required.

MAT-151   Calculus I4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-149 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C.

A study of differential and integral calculus of real functions of one real variable. Topics include limits and continuity, differentiation, the chain rule, the mean-value theorem, the fundamental theorem of calculus, curve sketching, integration by substitution, introductory differential equations, and applications of the derivative and integral.

MAT-152   Calculus II4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-151 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C.

MAT-152 is a continuation of MAT-151. A further study of differential and integral calculus of real functions of one real variable. Topics include further techniques of integration, applications of the integral (volume, arc length, work), and sequences and series.

CSC-152   Computer Science II: Data Structures4 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-150. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

This course continues CSC-150 with further study of data abstraction, algorithm design, and object-oriented principles. Topics may include inheritance, polymorphism, method overloading, recursion, lists, stacks, queues, trees, and searching and sorting algorithms, all using abstract data structures.

KPHE-160   Physical Education Activity (Second 6 weeks of semester)1 credit

A wide variety of basic instruction activity classes to encourage participation and skill development in individual and team sports at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. Typical offerings include aerobic dance, ballroom dance, ballet I and II, jazz dance I and II, choreography practice, rhythmic and movement skills, badminton, basketball, body conditioning, bowling, golf, jogging, judo, racquetball, rock climbing, kayaking, shooting, skiing, soccer, softball, swimming, scuba diving, life guard training, volleyball and weight training.

ENV-160   Environmental Science I3 credits

Corequisites:ENV-160L

This interdisciplinary course introduces physical principles as they apply to understanding environmental problems and issues. Topics include: human dependence on natural resources; energy; climate, nutrient cycles and soils; chemistry of the atmosphere and air pollution; chemistry of water pollution; solid and hazardous wastes; and the power, limitations, and roles of science and technology in society.

CSC-160   Introduction to Computer Architecture3 credits

Prerequisites:Any of MAT-1xx (Applied Calculus), MAT-151, MAT-152 or placement. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

A broad introduction to computing systems beginning with an introduction to digital logic and progressing through other topics including machine-level representation of data and instructions, controller and data-path design, instruction-set considerations, reduced instruction-set computers, and basic pipelining.

ENV-160L   Environmental Science I Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:ENV-160

This is the laboratory course for ENV-160.

KIN-170   Team Sports Skills2 credits

Prerequisites:P.E. major

Instruction and practice in sport skills (basketball, soccer, speed ball, volleyball, football and softball) emphasizing fundamental, skill progression and practical applications of team concepts.

PHY-170   Engineering Analysis2 credits

An introduction to modeling and computer techniques used in engineering. Students should have some basic computer skills and strong mathematics skills.

KIN-171   Lifetime/Leisure Activities2 credits

Prerequisites:P.E. major

Instruction and practice in lifetime/leisure activities (archery, badminton, pickleball, golf and tennis) emphasizing fundamentals, skill progression and practical applications of the activities.

BIO-198   Biology Colloquium.5 credits

A seminar series highlighting contemporary research in biology. This course is intended to introduce students to a wide range of fields within the biological sciences. Course can be repeated for up to 2 credits (4 semesters).

SPE-199   Debate I1 credit

This course is designed for students who wish to participate in intercollegiate debate and speech competitions. It will lecture/discussion sessions and mock debates. Students may compete and attend lecture/discussion sessions without enrolling for credit. Only three units of credit will count toward the major in Politics and Economics or International Political Economy. Pass/Fail.

POE-199   Model United Nations I1 credit

A study of international diplomacy through simulation exercises of the United Nations and related international organizations. Topics will vary according to the current agenda of international policy making. As international issues can range from terrorism and war to climate change and health care students from all majors and backgrounds are encouraged to enroll. May be repeated for credit. Only three credits of POE-199 and POE-399 (Model United Nations II) will count toward a major in the Political Economy department.

PHY-199   Math & Physics Colloquium.5 credits

A series of talks on topics related to mathematics and the physical sciences, intended to expose students to opportunities available in these fields. Topics may include current research projects, summer internship reports, and career development. May be repeated for credit.

MAT-199   Math & Physics Colloquium.5 credits

A series of talks on topics related to mathematics and the physical sciences, intended to expose students to opportunities available in these fields. Topics may include current research projects, summer internship reports, and career development. May be repeated for credit.

JOURN-199T   Special Topics in Interactive Journalism1 credit

Topics vary.

ART-199T   Special Topics in Art1 - 3 credits

These one-credit introductory topics offer students a variety of hands-on studio experiences. All courses will address basic design principles and artistic concepts, and will allow students to explore a variety of media. Topics may include: Handmade Paper and Books, The Sketchbook, The Ceramic Cup, Small Works, Color, Graphic Design, Artistic Transformations of the Human Body, and The Spirit of the Land.

CHI-199T.1   Chinese Language & Culture I5 credits

Beginning course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Chinese, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

PSY-199T.2   Applied Behavior and Learning2 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-100

This course utilizes the latest research and principles of behavior and learning utilizing the canine as companion animal as a model. Students will learn to apply behavioral principles to evaluate training practices currently used in companion and service animal training - primary examples will be using canines.

CHI-199T.2   Chinese Language & Culture II5 credits

Prerequisites:MFL-199T.1

The second sequence in beginning Chinese. A course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing, focused on cultural understanding and proficiency in communication.

CHI-199TREV   Chinese Grammar & Phonetics Review1 credit

Prerequisites:MFL-199T.1

A systematic review of the most challenging elements of first semester Chinese using a different set of instructional materials from those employed in MFL-199T.1. This course provides students with an opportunity to preserve, reinforce, and enhance their mastery of newly acquired skills before beginning their second semester in the language.

KIN-200   Foundations of Physical Education3 credits

A course designed to acquaint the student with the concept of physical education as a profession and to orient the student to the college program. The course includes the history of physical education including philosophical, sociological, institutional, and personal influences and application of education principles to physical education, recreation and athletics.

BUS-200   Small Business Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100

Students develop their enterprising ability as a foundation for ongoing personal and professional growth. They also develop their understanding of the small business environment and entrepreneurship. During the semester, students create a business plan for a new venture as a way to integrate and apply the abilities and knowledge in marketing, finance, management, and organization.

HIS-200   Introduction to the History of the United States3 credits

An introduction of the basic themes, issues and personalities of American history from precolonial times to the present.

ENV-200   Nature and Culture: Introduction to Environmental Studies3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

An investigation of the relationships among nature, self, and community, with special emphasis given to the interdisciplinary nature of environmental studies. The course is writing-intensive and pursues analysis of environmental issues and concepts. Students interested in the Environmental Studies major should complete this course during their freshman or sophomore years.

THE-200   Introduction to Film Studies3 credits

This course will introduce students to the craft of film making so they may view movies with a more critical eye. The class will focus on film analysis, forms, genres, and technical aspects. The course will utilize lectures, film clips, and full features as part of the class experience and students will also learn techniques for writing critically about film.

JOURN-200   Principles and Practices of Journalism: Print3 credits

Deals with print and the elements of journalistic writing including sections on ethics, history and an analysis of the role of the media in society.

KIN-201   Introduction to Health3 credits

An introductory survey of health with an emphasis on the school environment. Topics include communicable and non-communicable diseases, drugs, alcohol, human reproduction and school health assessments.

PSY-201   Introduction to Developmental Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-100

This course is a survey of the psychological development of humans across the life cycle. The course will include a focus on behavioral processes and challenges of the developmental stages from early childhood till late adulthood. The major theories and methods used to study developmental psychology will be considered. Some reading of the primary literature of developmental psychology will be required.

SPE-201   Foundations of Oral Communication3 credits

A broad-based introduction to oral communication in daily life. Includes theory and experience in communication models, interpersonal communication, group discussion and formal public speaking.

JOURN-201   Principles and Practices of Journalism: Visual3 credits

Focuses on Visual Journalism - broadcast and interactive. The uses of the Internet and challenges for journalists that it presents will be a fundamental focus of this class.

LSP-201   Leadership Theories, Styles and Realities3 credits

This course is designed to challenge students to apply the theoretical and philosophical aspects of leadership to their organizations. Topics addressed include leadership style, motivation, group process, team building, communication, power and authority, and ethics in leadership.

MS-201   Introduction to Leadership2 credits

An overview of Military Leadership which prepares students for ROTC advanced courses. Classroom and laboratory instruction includes: leadership, land navigation, adventure training, oral and written communications, responsibilities of Army officers, and other general military subjects. Course is designed to aid future leaders in acquiring effective skills for influencing others, with particular reference to positions of military leadership.

BIO-201   Molecules to Cells3 credits

Corequisites:BIO-201L

This is the first course in a three semester sequence for biology majors. Course topics will cover fundamental concepts including biomolecule structure and function, energy metabolism (respiration and photosynthesis), the biology of inheritance, and gene structure, function, and expression. Focus on frontier areas of biology with an emphasis on molecular and cellular processes. Examples may include human genetics, bioinformatics, or cancer biology. Emphasis on scientific problem-solving, including collection, analysis, and interpretation of biological data. This course is designed for students who plan to take further coursework in biology or related disciplines.

THE-201   Play Analysis3 credits

Play scripts are the words of the playwright which serve as a blueprint from which directors, designers, and actors create a specific world for an audience. Thorough analysis of the play is critical for the writer's story to be fully realized on stage. Students will learn to closely examine the play script using various methods of analysis in order to make informed choices about performance and design elements.

ART-201   Visual Communication I3 credits

This introductory course will focus on graphic design and visual communication. Topics will include the use of basic typography, photography and illustration to convey compelling messages through studio assignments using Adobe Creative Suite. Students are encouraged to complete ART-130, Introduction to Design.

PHI-201   The Good Life3 credits

An exploration of philosophical and religious perspectives on happiness, the good life, and how we ought to live.

BIO-201L   Molecules to Cells1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-201

This is the laboratory course for BIO-201.

ATH-202   Cultural Diversity3 credits

An examination of the range of human cultures through the perspective of Cultural Anthropology. The course work will include selected case studies and theoretical constructs, including the concepts of culture, ethnic identity, and cultural pluralism.

KIN-202   Sports Officiating3 credits

A study of the rules, mechanics and philosophy of sports officiating.

EDU-202   Introduction to Teaching3 credits

An exploration of education that emphasizes multiple perspectives on teaching, students, and the contexts of schooling. Introduces a conceptual framework of the types of knowledge necessary to become a reflective, problem-solving practitioner who scrutinizes conventional wisdom. Involves 12-15 hours observation, tutoring, and other activities in a K-12 setting.

MUS-202   Music Theory III3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-104

Designed to cover the complete chromatic harmonic language of the late 19th century and to reinforce the melodic, harmonic and rhythmic concepts of traditional music by means of original composition and critical analysis of form and style.

PSY-202   Introduction to Biological Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-100

This course is one of the four content courses for the core of the psychology major and provides an introduction to the methods and topics of bio-psychology. Topics to be covered include the major assumptions of a bio-psychological approach, basic neuroanatomy (structural and functional), the role of neurophysiological and neurochemical processes on behavior (including psychopharmacological principles), and the biological underpinnings of learning and memory. The concept of neural plasticity is an underlying concept to much of the course. The course will include the methods used to acquire information about the bio-psychology of human and infra-human behavior.

MS-202   Military Leadership2 credits

A continuation of learning leadership skills with continuing emphasis on professional development through land navigation, rappelling, first aid, marksmanship, and other military skills. Laboratory consists of progressive participation in leadership exercises, adventure training, and tactical operations.

HIS-202   History and the Movies1 credit

Film makers and professional historians both construct narratives about the past. They do so with different purposes and different standards of evidence. This course will examine the portrayal of history in film and contrast cinematic representation of history with printed sources. The course will examine similarities and differences in the criteria for the critical evaluation of historical films and the historian's accounts of the past.

BIO-202   Organismal Biology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-201

Corequisites:BIO-202L

This is the second course in a three semester sequence for biology majors. The course examines reproduction, development, anatomy, and physiology of higher animals and plants, including trends in the evolution of plants.

ART-202   Visual Communication II3 credits

Prerequisites:ART-201

This intermediate course covers techniques and theories of visual communication in print and web design. It will include studio assignments that develop refined use of typography, layout, images and interactivity using Adobe Creative Suite.

REL-202   Christianity3 credits

An in-depth examination of the beliefs and practices of the Christian tradition. While the course has a historical component, special emphasis is placed on Christianity in contemporary culture.

PHI-202   Bioethics3.00 credits

A study of contemporary issues such as abortion, physician-assisted suicide, rights of human research subjects, and how to pay for care. Students will study both theory and case analysis

BIO-202L   Organismal Biology Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-202

This is the laboratory course for BIO-202.

MUS-203   Music Theory IV3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-202

A study of the compositional techniques and materials employed in the 20th century as presented through analysis, score reading, composition, written exercises, and critical listening.

PSY-203   Introduction to Cognitive Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-100

This course provides an introduction to cognitive psychology. You will learn about the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, language, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will cover the processes by which researchers develop theories and test evidence. An important part of this methodology concerns the manner in which knowledge of brain function can illuminate theories of cognition. Activities will include lectures, discussions, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources.

BIO-203   Ecology, Evolution and Diversity3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and MAT-112 or MAT-212

Corequisites:BIO-203L

This is the third course in a three semester sequence for biology majors. Examines the ecology, evolution, and diversity of life. Topics to be covered include population ecology, population genetics, evolution, phylogeny and classification, and a survey of the animal kingdom - including trends in animal evolution.

REL-203   Buddhism3 credits

An introduction to the variety of religious experiences and expressions found in the Buddhist tradition, and the methods by which they are studied.

BIO-203L   Ecology, Evolution and Diversity Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-203

This is the laboratory course for BIO-203. Includes discussion, field study, and laboratory experience

REL-204   Islam3 credits

An examination of the history, practices and beliefs of Islam from its origin to the present, including both Islam's unity and its diversity. Special emphasis is placed on issues in contemporary Islam.

POE-205   Social Order & Disorder3 credits

An introductory exploration of the problem of social order through the eyes of select modern thinkers. Emphasis is placed on the problems of international order and development. Perspectives from bio-politics, biogeography, political culture, rational choice, and various theories of international political economy are considered. Readings include works by Adam Smith, Alexis de Tocqueville, Sigmund Freud, Frans de Waal, Clifford Geertz, Kenneth Waltz, Francis Fukuyama, Jared Diamond, and others.

REL-205   Native American Religions3 credits

An exploration of the diverse indigenous religious traditions of the Americas, with emphasis on the religion and spirituality of North American traditions.

ATH-206   Native North Americans3 credits

A survey of Native American Indian cultures in different regions of North America, including their social/economic structures, world views, artistic traditions, and their histories before and after European contact.

PSY-206   Social Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-100

An introduction to the study of individuals in group settings. Topics may include attachment/bonding, affiliation, aggression, helping, and development. For each topic studied, there will be discussion of important findings and the research methods used within the field of study.

ART-207   Digital Video3 credits

This course covers the techniques, theories and skills of creating video. Concepts such as story boarding, editing, lighting and composition will be covered. Students will develop, shoot, and edit short video projects.

KIN-210   Coaching Methods2 credits

An elective course for students seeking a minor in coaching, a major in either physical education or exercise science. Developing a knowledge base and application of principles of training, development of a coaching and training philosophy, writing and managing training logs, planning short and long term objectives, methods and style of coaching, how to train and the physiological effects of training. Evaluation of the processes involved in achieving performance objectives to enhance the appropriate physiological response to training/learning.

ENG-210   Shakespearean Comedy3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course will trace the development of Shakespearean comedy through representative plays from all stages of the dramatist's career. In the process, the class will explore the literary, theatrical, religious, political, and cultural significance of comedy, both in general and in its Shakespearean form.

HIS-210   History of Modern East Asia3 credits

An introduction of the basic themes, issues and personalities of Asian history from 1800 to the present.

PHY-210   Statics3 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-271

Structural analysis of beams and trusses subjected to both concentrated and distributed loads. This course is normally taken by pre-engineering students.

THE-210   Stage Makeup3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-115

Study of the principles, techniques and materials involved in the craft of stage makeup. This course will explore basic makeup techniques for stage actors as well as special makeup effects that may include: old age makeup, fantasy, and prosthetics.

PHI-210   Human Nature and the Scientific World-View3 credits

A study of philosophical questions regarding what it is to be human, with particular attention to those posed by a scientific understanding of the world. Issues will include what it means to describe human behavior as "natural," and whether explanations from the social and natural sciences conflict with our understanding of ourselves as free and responsible

REL-210   Japanese Religions3 credits

An exploration of the many religious traditions of Japan and the cultural and historical factors that influenced their development.

LSP-210   Servant Leadership3 credits

An introduction to the theory, literature, and practice of Servant leadership. Topics addressed: values and skills in leadership including awareness, listening, empathy, stewardship, healing, visioning, community-building, and commitment to the growth of people in leadership settings.

THE-211   Costume Skills2 credits

Study of the principles, techniques and materials involved in costume construction. Students will learn stitching techniques, sewing machine/serger operation, and fundamentals of choosing fabric for theatrical costuming. Extra Fee.

ENG-211   Weird Shakespeare3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course explores the Shakespeare nobody told you about, using some underexposed plays and poems studied on their own terms (rather than as anomalies or mere background for better known plays) and situated in their literary, theatrical, historical, and cultural contexts.

FRE-211   French Language & Culture III3 credits

Prerequisites:FRE-112 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Using civilization, contemporary society and the cultural heritage for context, this course focuses on increasing fluency at the intermediate level while providing additional training in grammar.

ENG-212   Introduction to Shakespeare3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

Through careful scrutiny of representative plays in several genres and from different periods in Shakespeare's career, this course will test popular perceptions of English literature's most overexposed figure by situating him in his literary, theatrical, historical, and cultural contexts.

MAT-212   Advanced Statistical Methods3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-112 or MAT-123.1 or MAT-149 or MAT-151 or MAT-152 or MAT-251 or equivalent course. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

Introduction to statistical methods for a mathematics or science major. Topics covered include analysis of variance, multiple regression and analysis, chi square and time series. A statistical software package will be used. Students who have taken calculus should take this course rather than MAT-112.

REL-212   Buddhism in America3 credits

An examination of the transmission, history, and contemporary landscape of Buddhism in the United States.

FRE-212   French Language & Culture IV3 credits

Prerequisites:FRE-211 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Using civilization, contemporary society and the cultural heritage for context, this course focuses on increasing fluency at the intermediate level while providing additional training in grammar.

ENG-213   Introduction to Arthurian Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course surveys changing literary responses to the legend of King Arthur, from its misty historical origins in early medieval Britain, through the flowering of Arthurian romance in the High Middle Ages, to various post-Romantic re-imaginings of the Arthurian material. We will ask, among other things, why this material retained its tenacious hold on the Western European (and, later, the American) imagination, and especially how authors continued to find new uses for stories long separated from their originating cultural conditions.

PHI-214   Introduction to Logic3 credits

An introduction to symbolic logic through first order predicate logic.

MUS-215   Survey of Opera History3 credits

This course is appropriate for students without a background in music. A study of the historical development of opera with topics alternating from the works of Mozart, Italian Opera, German Romantic Opera, French Grand Opera, American and British works through the 21st Century. Attention will be given to the musical and stylistic characteristics, the music/poetic synthesis as seen through the libretto, and the role of opera in a societal and political perspective.

THE-215   Fundamentals of Acting3 credits

An introduction to acting for the stage. Emphasis is placed on communication and exploration of character. Exercises involve both improvisation as well as work with scripted scenes.

THE-216   Voice & Diction3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215 is recommended.

Exploration into the mechanics, articulation and vocal techniques vital to stage performers and other public speaking related fields. Uses text and exercises to free the voice, develop effective breathing, flexibility of vocal production and projection. Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet and its application to stage dialects will also be explored.

ENG-218   World War I and Modern Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

World War I, the most literary war in British history, altered the landscape of British literature. This course will examine the war poets' verse; soldiers' and nurses' autobiographies; Virginia Woolf's modernist novel Mrs. Dalloway; T. S. Eliot's poem "The Waste Land"; and Pat Barker's recent novel Regeneration, the fictional account of the relationship between military psychiatrist William Rivers and shell-shocked poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen.

ENG-219   Thief-making and Thief-taking: Nineteenth-century Crime Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

The nineteenth century was immersed in defining criminality and, through the gradual professionalization of the police, constructing the criminal's nemesis, the detective. Through popular crime fiction, newspaper accounts of an actual criminal case, and articles from nineteenth-century periodicals, we will explore how the nineteenth-century fascination with crime and detectives was shaped by preoccupations with the construction of gender, class dynamics, and the tension between the didactic and entertainment functions of these literary forms.

HIS-220   History of Modern Europe3 credits

An introduction of the basic themes, issues and personalities of European history from the era of the French Revolution until the present.

REL-220   Christian Spirituality3 credits

An introduction to the history and practice of spirituality in the Christian tradition, and the methods by which they are studied. Topics may include: historical and denominational contributions to the practice of spirituality; the historical split of the "sacred and secular" in Western Christianity; the nature and value of "spiritual disciplines" in personal and religious formation; the correlation of spiritual and psychological growth.

ACC-221   Financial Accounting3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100, MAT-150 and MAT-125 or MAT-212 or equivalent

An introduction to the field of accounting, emphasizing double-entry record keeping, preparation of balance sheets and income statements, and the uses and limitations of external financial reporting.

MAT-221   Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-105 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C.

Topics include number systems, problem solving, sets, logic and properties of whole numbers and rational numbers. The emphasis is on mathematics taught in the elementary school classroom, using a variety of teaching techniques, methods, and hands-on materials including manipulatives and technology.

PSY-221   Educational Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:Education concentration or instructor permission.

A study of the psychological principles applicable to educational theory and practice. This course fulfills a state requirement for teacher certification.

ACC-222   Managerial Accounting3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-221

A study of the role of accounting information in decision-making emphasizing the use of accounting data for internal management decisions. The course includes an introduction to cash flows, cost accounting, cost-volume-profit relationships and budgeting in business decisions.

MAT-222   Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-105 or MAT-221 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C.

Topics include properties of real numbers, descriptive statistics and geometry. The emphasis is on mathematics taught in the elementary school classroom, using a variety of teaching techniques, methods, and hands-on materials including manipulatives and technology.

GER-223   German Language & Culture III3 credits

Prerequisites:GER-122 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Using civilization, contemporary society and the cultural heritage for context, this course focuses on increasing fluency at the intermediate level while providing additional training in grammar.

GER-224   German Language & Culture IV3 credits

Prerequisites:GER-223 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Using civilization, contemporary society and the cultural heritage for context, this course focuses on increasing fluency at the intermediate level while providing additional training in grammar.

ENG-225   Asia through its Movies3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

Students will analyze contemporary Asian cultures through movies from Hong Kong, Japan, Vietnam, mainland China and the Indian subcontinent. Genres will include wu-xia, anime, sci-fi, musicals, yakuza narratives and "art house" movies. Course readings will include cultural studies theory, short stories, and the directors' and artists' essays and commentaries.

REL-225   Christian Theology3 credits

A survey of the most foundational and influential theologians and theological ideas of the Christian tradition.

ENG-226   Postmodernism and Human Rights Activism3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course explores contemporary theories, fiction, poetry, and movies by ethnic and indigenous peoples in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Australasia. This course will feature authors who violate literary forms and genres as methods of resistance and empowerment. Topics may include Arab nationalism, the Intifada, the Bangla Language Movement, the Cultural Revolution, and apartheid.

ART-230   Introduction to Sculpture3 credits

A studio course exploring a variety of media and techniques including modeling, carving, and assemblage. Related lectures explore the historical context of sculptors' approach.

BUS-230   Personal Finance1 credit

First and second six weeks. Survival skills necessary to insure financial life after graduation. Students will discuss and develop a personal philosophy of spending, saving, and investing. Topics of consumption expenditures will include housing, insurance, investments, personal expenditures and the use of credit. Students will use computer programs to develop personal financial plans for the present and projections for the future.

ENG-230   Literature of the American West3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course examines the American West as imagined and depicted by twentieth-century writers. How do individualism, racial difference, aridity, competition over natural resources, and environmentalism shape the way Americans imagine the West? How does the West in its conflicts, diversity, and complexity epitomize in a dramatic way what we imagine as deeply American? These are just some of the questions that we will attempt to answer through our reading of novels, short stories, poems and essays by American westerners.

HIS-230   History of Modern Latin America3 credits

An introduction of the basic themes, issues and personalities of Latin American history from 1800 to the present.

PHY-230   Digital Electronics3 credits

An introduction to digital electronics including number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, Karnaugh maps, combinatorial circuits, flip-flops, registers, counters, sequential state-machines and introduction to Hardware Description Languages (HDL). No previous electronics experience is required.

MUSAP-230   Applied Music0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Personalized private lessons on an instrument or in voice (prerequisite for voice is MUS-133). Requires a minimum of three hours of practice weekly in addition to 30 minutes of instruction for each unit of credit. More practice may be required at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Extra fee.

ENG-231   Native American Fiction3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course will explore the last forty years of Native American and First Nations fiction. We will begin by examining the social climate of the late 1960s that surrounded the beginning of the literary period known as the Native American Renaissance. Our survey will then take us forward to the present as we explore the adaptation of indigenous story traditions and conventions into contemporary novel forms in fiction which is funny, tragic, and suspenseful.

PHY-231   General Physics I3 credits

Corequisites:PHY-231L

A non-calculus survey of physics topics including motion, forces, work, energy, and thermal physics. Facility with algebra and trigonometry will be assumed. Students with secondary school experience in physics and/or mathematics through calculus are strongly urged to take the PHY-271 - PHY-272 sequence. Three lectures weekly. In special circumstances, this course may be taken for 3 credits without lab. Consult instructor. Credit for PHY-231 will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-271.

MUS-231   Piano Proficiency Exam0 credits

Students in the music education program MUS meet a minimum standard of piano proficiency. The exam requires the vocal ed. examinee to play one prepared piece at the late-intermediate level or higher and sight-read a piece at the early-intermediate level. The instrumental ed. examinee is required to play one prepared piece at the early intermediate level or higher, and to sight-read one late beginner piece. Students may opt out of this requirement by taking two semesters of applied piano lessons.

PHY-231L   General Physics I Lab1 credit

Corequisites:PHY-231

An integral part of PHY-231 with which the lab should normally be taken concurrently. One laboratory weekly. Credit for PHY-231L will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-271L.

ENG-232   The Literature of Slavery3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course focuses on the literary history of chattel slavery, particularly as it pertains to the United States, and on how slavery and its legacy have shaped--and functioned within--literary and cultural traditions. We will concentrate on the period of 1700-1861 in American literary history, and readings will include letters, poetry, fiction, and autobiographical narratives about the slavery experience, as well as various writings that both denounce and support the institution of slavery. As we will see, the literature of slavery and the issues it raises are both political and personal, both historical and contemporary.

PHY-232   General Physics II3 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-231

Corequisites:PHY-232L

A non-calculus survey of physics topics including waves, light, optics, electrostatics, circuits, and modern physics. Facility with algebra and trigonometry will be assumed. Students with secondary school experience in physics and/or mathematics through calculus are strongly urged to take the PHY-271 - PHY-272 sequence. Three lectures weekly. In special circumstances, this course may be taken for 3 credits without lab. In special circumstances, a student with previous physics experience may take this course without PHY-231. Consult instructor. Credit for PHY-232 will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-272.

SPA-232   Spanish Language& Culture III3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-132 or equivalent or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Using civilization, contemporary society, and the cultural heritage for context, this course focuses on increasing fluency at the intermediate level while providing additional training in grammar and writing

PHY-232L   General Physics II Lab1 credit

Prerequisites:PHY-231

Corequisites:PHY-232

An integral part of PHY-232 with which the lab should normally be taken concurrently. One laboratory weekly. Credit for PHY-232L will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-272L.

ENG-233   The Literature of Immigrants3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course examines nonwestern immigrant experiences in North America and Britain through fiction, poetry, personal memoir, and letters. Topics may include generational conflicts, hyphenated identity, racial discrimination, and immigrant rights. We will study the emergence of immigrant activism and the effects of twentieth-century wars, foreign policies, and immigration laws on domestic civil rights movements.

SPA-233   Spanish Language& Culture IV 3 credits

Prerequisites:MFL-232 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

Using civilization, contemporary society, and the cultural heritage for context, this course focuses on increasing fluency at the intermediate level while providing additional training in grammar and writing.

ENG-235   Prose and Cons3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

Through careful examination of selected works of primarily American prison literature, this course investigates a vision of America from the bottom up, explores the American prison, and considers critically the possible meanings of imprisonment and punishment, discipline and freedom. Authors may include Malcom X, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Ken Lamberton, Agnes Smedley, and Richard Shelton.

CSC-235   Programming Languages3 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-152. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

An examination of the principles of programming language design, together with tools and techniques of implementation. Specific instances of several families of languages are investigated, together with theoretical considerations; these families may include object-oriented, functional, and data-flow languages.

SPA-235   Spanish for Heritage Speakers3 credits

This course is designed for heritage speakers of Spanish with oral proficiency but with little or no formal training in the language. The course will expand students' linguistic abilities through intensive grammar instruction, vocabulary building, readings from various academic and professional contexts, and writing assignments. Students will develop their abilities to communicate in an accurate, informed manner within various registers and socio-cultural contexts.

ENG-236   Literature and Comedy3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

In this course we study the evolution and variety of comedy in literature, from classical Greece to contemporary United States. Along the way, we examine different comedic categories, such as the picaresque, absurdism, parody, satire, and black comedy. We examine the rhetoric of comedy: What makes a particular work funny? Why do we laugh? What are the motivations for comedy; when is it meant as "comic relief" from reality, and when is it meant as subversive critique of society?

ENG-237   Money in Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

Sampling several centuries, countries, and literary genres, this course traces the love-hate relationship between literary art and financial calculation, a relationship which raises questions regarding what has value and what doesn't, what is real and what isn't, what humans in society owe to one another, and what purpose artistic endeavor is supposed to serve in a world where such endeavor rarely pays.

ENG-238   Old and New: Premodern Texts and Modern Responses3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course will pair influential premodern works with modern reworkings of them, as a way of thinking about how writers use the literature they inherit to stimulate new creation.

ART-239   Ancient to Medieval3 credits

An introduction to basic art history terms and concepts and a survey of major western art works from pre-history to Fourteenth-century Europe. The course may include cross-cultural comparisons to place the works in the wider context of world art.

ENG-239   Visions of Environment3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

This course focuses on writers who have shaped thinking about the environment in the United States. The course first examines the historical and philosophical bases for American conceptions of nature, and then analyzes literary treatments of concepts such as bioregionalism, wilderness, sense of place, and environmentalism. Authors include Henry David Thoreau, George Perkins Marsh, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, and others.

ART-240   Renaissance to Modern3 credits

A survey of key developments in the history of western art from fifteenth-century Europe to present. Cross-cultural comparisons will be made.

PHY-240   Analog Electronics3 credits

Corequisites:PHY-240L

An introduction to electronics including fundamental laws, basic network analysis, and circuit theorems. Topics also include capacitors, inductors, operational-amplifier circuits, first- and second-order circuits, and sinusoidal steady-state analysis of AC circuits. Circuit simulation will be used throughout the course.

THE-240   Theatre Ensemble1 credit

Guided participation in the production of Department Mainstage productions. Students in this course will assist in the building of sets and costumes and/or lighting Mainstage plays. Students should be aware that the course runs only during the production build-time of the play (September through mid-November and February through April). May be repeated for credit.

POE-240    The Legal Process3 credits

An introductory examination of the legal process and the role of law in society.

PHY-240L   Analog Electronics Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:PHY-240

Laboratory section for PHY-240.

POE-241   Introduction to Public Policy3 credits

An introduction to the public policy process and the analysis of specific public policies.

HIS-242   The History of Christianity3 credits

A survey of the history of Christianity from its beginnings to the present.

KIN-244   Care and Prevention of Injury3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-104 or BIO-303

A study of the prevention, recognition and treatment of common athletic injuries, including emergency first aid procedures, taping and wrapping.

ENG-245   Poetry Writing Workshop3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

In this workshop students will both study examples of and write various kinds of poetry, such as lyric, narrative, dramatic, and prose poems. Students will critique the work of their classmates and analyze that of published authors. Special emphasis will be given to studying the forms and strategies of poetry, critically responding to others' work and generating and revising one's own work.

ENG-246   Fiction Writing Workshop3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

In this workshop students will write literary fiction and study contemporary novels and short narratives. Students will critique the work of their classmates and analyze that of published authors. Special emphasis will be given to studying the forms and strategies of literary fiction, critically responding to others' work, and generating and revising one's own work.

ENG-247   Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

In this workshop students will both study examples of and write various kinds of creative nonfiction, such as memoir, travel writing, nature writing, cultural criticism, and literary journalism. Students will read the work of their classmates as well as that of published authors. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the forms and strategies of creative nonfiction, critically responding to others' work, and generating and revising one's own work.

ATH-249   Natives of South America3 credits

An examination of the indigenous peoples and their cultures in the Amazon and the Andes. Course includes contemporary economics, religion, social organization, politics, the arts, and issues of current concern.

EDU-249   Researching Schools3 credits

A study of social science research focusing on an examination of current research practices and structures as they apply to American public education. Students will design and conduct a research project, applying research techniques discussed in class.

THE-250   Scenic Painting3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-240

An introduction to theatrical scene painting techniques and execution. This course will explore painting equipment and supplies, priming and preparation of surfaces and materials, standard techniques and use of texture for ornamental effects. Extra fee.

POE-250   Introduction to Political Philosophy3 credits

An introduction to the major themes of political philosophy.

MS-250   Fitness Activities1 credit

A practical application of military style fitness adapted for any students who wish to improve their overall physical fitness level. Emphasis is on cardiovascular and upper body development. May be repeated for up to 12 credits. NOTE : Only eight (8) total credits of physical activities can be counted toward the The College of Idaho Bachelor's degree.

MAT-251   Calculus III4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-152 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C.

A continuation of MAT-152. A study of real functions of several real variables. Topics include differentiability and continuity, differential geometry, extrema, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, and the theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes.

CHE-252   Analytical Chemistry I3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-142 and CHE-142L

Corequisites:CHE-252L

An introduction to the theory and techniques of analytical chemistry including volumetric/gravimetric methods, acid/base chemistry, potentiometry, complex equilibria, method validation and error analysis. Three hours of lecture weekly.

MAT-252   Discrete Mathematics3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

Systems of linear equations, matrix operations, combinatorics, graph theory. Offered Spring term of odd numbered years.

CHE-252L   Analytical Chemistry I Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-142 and CHE-142L

Corequisites:CHE-252

Required laboratory course for CHE-252. One 3.5-hour laboratory weekly

EDU-253   Language Development & Literacy3 credits

A study of language development, including the interaction between home and school in preparing children to read and write. Emphasis is placed on assessment of emergent literacy, development of literacy and instructional techniques to promote literacy.

PSY-254   Psychology & the Movies3 credits

This course will examine the effects that professional psychology has had on the view of human nature as portrayed in film. Topics will include common presentations of the normal, abnormal, and extra-normal functioning of persons in this medium. There will be consideration of correct and incorrect representations of the categories of abnormality in the current Diagnostics and Statistics Manual of the American Psychiatric Association. Films will be combined with readings and discussion.

POE-255   American Foreign Policy3 credits

An examination of the trends and dilemmas related to American foreign policy. Emphasis is on America's foreign policy style as a superpower from World War II to the present as well as debates over America's interests, obligations, and policy options.

ATH-260   Peoples of the Andes3 credits

An in-depth examination of the contemporary indigenous and urban people of the Andes and their cultures, including contemporary economics, religion, politics, social organization, the arts, and issues of current concern. As part of the immersion experience, students will focus on Cusco, Peru, and will integrate their learning with field participation and experience in Cusco and nearby indigenous villages, markets, artisan workshops, and religious festivals.

BIO-260   Diversity of Life1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203

Corequisites:BIO-260L

A survey of major taxonomic groups of organisms with an emphasis on biological classification, phylogeny reconstruction, biological diversity, and comparative morphology. Readings, lectures, discussions, and lab activities.

ENV-260   Environmental Science II3 credits

Prerequisites:ENV-160

Corequisites:ENV-260L

This course explores biological and ecological principles as a means of understanding the behavior of complex environmental systems, including biotic communities, and ecosystems, such as forests, coral reefs, and agricultural ecosystems. We investigate human population dynamics and human impacts on these systems and consider issues in areas such as climatology, biodiversity, conservation biology, sustainable agriculture, toxicology, and risk assessment using various models, problem-solving approaches, and interdisciplinary perspectives.

THE-260   Stage Management3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-240

An exploration of the process and principles of stage management. This course will teach students the tools used to confidently oversee the rehearsal and performance procedures of a stage production. Students will gain experience in organizing a prompt book, running a rehearsal, supervising crew chiefs and successfully calling a performance. Students will also be required to create a stage manager's kit.

BIO-260L   Diversity of Life Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-260

This is the laboratory course for BIO-260.

ENV-260L   Environmental Science II Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:ENV-160

Corequisites:ENV-260

This is the laboratory course for ENV-260.

POE-263   Introduction to Political Economy4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-125 or MAT-150

An introduction to classical political economy philosophies and the economic principles that were developed in response to such philosophies. These principles will be used to promote understanding of how economic considerations constrain and influence political decisions and processes.

THE-270   Theatre & Arts Management3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215

Company structure, financing, marketing, promotion, box office and house management associated with theatre and the performing arts. Lab (as appropriate) linked to production.

BUS-270   Principles of Economics3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100, MAT-150 or higher Calculus course and MAT-125 or MAT-212

A survey of economic analysis and institutions combining economic theory with a discussion of applications to the U. S. economic system. The course will include an introduction to both microeconomics and macroeconomics.

CSC-270   Applied Databases3 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-150. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of database design and management. Topics may include entity-relationship and relational data models, normalization, relational database design and implementation, SQL, and administration.

PHY-271   Analytical Physics I4 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-151 and MAT-152

Corequisites:PHY-271L

A general survey of physics topics including motion, forces, work, energy, waves, and special relativity. Calculus is used extensively and some familiarity with computers is assumed. This course is intended for math-physics majors and dual-degree engineering students and strongly recommended for any student who plans to do graduate work in any of the sciences or mathematics. Four lectures weekly. Credit for PHY-271 will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-231.

PHY-271L   Analytical Physics I Lab1 credit

Corequisites:PHY-271

An integral part of PHY-271 with which it should normally be taken concurrently. One laboratory period weekly. Credit for PHY-271L will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-231L.

PHY-272   Analytical Physics II4 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-271

Corequisites:PHY-272L

A general survey of physics topics including electricity, magnetism, optics, modern physics, and thermal physics. Calculus is used extensively and some familiarity with computers is assumed. This course is intended for math-physics majors and dual-degree engineering students and strongly recommended for any student who plans to do graduate work in any of the sciences or mathematics. Four lectures weekly. In special circumstances, a student with previous physics experience may take this course without PHY-271. Consult instructor. Credit for PHY-272 will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-232.

PHY-272L   Analytical Physics II Lab1 credit

Corequisites:PHY-272

An integral part of PHY-272 with which it should normally be taken concurrently. One laboratory period weekly. Credit for PHY-272L will not be granted to students who have completed PHY-232L.

ENG-280   Theory and Methods of the Study of Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101 and ENG-200-Level literature course (any version)

By introducing major movements and theories informing scholarly studies in literature, this course helps prepare serious students of literature for advanced study and research in the field. Students explore and apply major twentieth-century literary theories, thereby observing both how literature lends itself to different forms of interpretation and how the formal study of literature has changed over time. Students also write a substantial literary analysis grounded in literary-theoretical approaches. Topics of discussion may include new criticism, structuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, post-structuralism, gender studies, new formalism, race and ethnic studies, cultural studies, queer theory, new historicism, postcolonial theory, phenomenology, and eco criticism.

HIS-280   Historical Research: Historiography and Methods3 credits

Required of sophomores majoring in history. An introduction to select topics in the study and writing of history, including fundamentals of social scientific inquiry, historical research methods and sources, and historiography and the evaluation of evidence.

MS-290   Military Science Practicum6 credits

A field based introduction to military subjects such as land navigation, map reading, marksmanship, and leadership. Practicum is a five-week Leadership Training course at Fort Knox, Kentucky. This course fulfills MS-101, MS-102, MS-201, and MS-202 ROTC program requirements. Students may also earn a two-year scholarship while at this course. The College of Idaho Army ROTC advisor determines enrollment eligibility.

THE-291   Stage Combat3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215

Theory and technique for use in armed and unarmed stage combat. This course will allow students to polish their skills in illusionary stage violence while promoting safety and strong technical skills. Students will learn falls, rolls, hand to hand, and rapier fighting techniques (dagger, broadsword and/or quarterstaff techniques may be explored if time allows). Extra fee for weapon rental.

ATH-294   Independent Study3 credits

Readings in a specific area of anthropology, requiring a formal paper summarizing the study. See independent study guidelines.

ART-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Readings and research in art history for those with no previous art history background. See independent study guidelines.

KIN-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Special research projects on selected topics. See independent study guidelines.

BUS-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research in various areas of business for qualified students. May be repeated. See independent study guidelines.

EDU-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individual research including selected reading and assigned writings. See independent study guidelines.

ENG-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101 and instructor permission

A special research project on a selected topic. Independent studies cannot substitute for specific course requirements in the major or minor. See independent study guidelines.

HIS-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Reading or research in history as approved by the instructor. See independent study guidelines.

MAT-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Independent study of selected areas of mathematics not available in the regular curriculum. See independent study guidelines.

CSC-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits and is subject to arrangement with the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Department. This course does not fulfill the core requirement for independent work. See independent study guidelines.

PHY-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits and is subject to arrangement with the Mathematical and Physical Science Department. See independent study guidelines.

BIO-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Library research in biology. Critical review of literature pertaining to a problem or specialized topic in biology culminating in a paper written according to department guide lines. See independent study guidelines.

MFL-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Independent study in ESL, French, German, or Spanish for those students who may still require considerable assistance with communication in the target language. See independent study guidelines.

MUS-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Special topics in music. See independent study guidelines.

REL-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research studies in religion for qualified students. See independent study guidelines.

PHI-294   Independent Study3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Intended for non-majors or freshman/sophomore level students who have declared a philosophy major or minor.

PSY-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Independent study of special topics in psychology for the non-major or major not yet qualified for PSY-494. See independent study guidelines.

SOC-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:One course in sociology

Readings in a specific area of sociology, requiring a formal paper summarizing the study. See independent study guidelines.

JOURN-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A special research project on a selected topic. See independent study guidelines.

LAS-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individual readings or research in Latin American Studies, conducted in consultation with a Latin American Studies faculty member. See independent study guidelines.

ASN-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Student will undertake a special project on a selected topic related to Asian Studies under the guidance of an Asian Studies professor. Independent studies cannot substitute for specific course requirements in the minor. See independent study guidelines.

ENV-294   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A special research project on a selected topic. Independent studies cannot substitute for specific course requirements in the major or minor. See independent study guidelines.

PSY-296   Collaborative Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory or applied research culminating in a paper or other project. Conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in psychology. Examples of final projects would be an APA style paper or presenting a paper or poster at a psychology conference.

MFL-299   Intermediate Readings in Modern Foreign Languages1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Special topics for intermediate students who want to improve their reading skills working in German, French, Spanish, or English as a Second Language. Students read fiction and non-fiction works. May be repeated for credit.

POE-299   Evidence, Proof, & Knowledge3 credits

An introduction to scientific inquiry, search strategies for acquiring data, political science methods for evaluating data and statistical techniques for analyzing data. Students pursuing a major or a minor in Political Economy or International Political Economy must complete the introductory core before enrolling in this course.

POE-299T   Special Topics in Political Economy1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Study of selected areas of politics and economics not available in the regular curriculum. See course listed below.

JOURN-299T   Special Topics in Interactive Journalism1 credit

Topics vary.

PSY-299T.1   Positive Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-100

An introduction to the field of Positive Psychology which is defined as the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. Readings and discussion will focus on the three core components of the field; positive emotions, positive individual traits, and positive institutions.

MAT-299T.10   Introduction to Proof: Number Theory1 credit

Prerequisites:MAT-151 or higher with a minimum grade of C.

Methods of mathematical proof will be introduced using concepts from number theory. Topics may include: axioms for the integers, Euclidean algorithm, Diophantine equations, Fermat's Little Theorem, unique factorization, and primality testing.

MAT-299T.15   Introduction to Proof: Combinatorics1 credit

Prerequisites:MAT-151 or higher with a minimum grade of C

Methods of mathematical proof will be introduced using concepts from combinatorics. Topics may include: permutations and combinations, finite mathematical structures, inclusion-exclusion principle and elements of the theory of graphs.

POE-299T.2   American Political Leadership through Biography3 credits

This course examines American political leadership through the use of political biographies of U.S. presidents and other significant personalities as they interact with great political events to better understand what is entailed in political leadership. Course includes readings from political biographies such as Edmund Morris's Theodore Rex ; Doris Kerns Goodwin's No Ordinary Time and Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln ; David McCullough's John Adams and Truman ; Robert Caro's The Years of Lyndon Johnson ; Lou Cannon's President Reagan: The Role of a Life ; and others.

LSP-299T.2   Special Topics: Leadership in Business3 credits

Prerequisites:LSP-101 & LSP-201

This course helps participants build a theoretical and practical foundation for becoming effective leaders and managers in business and other organizations. This class is taught annually.

MAT-299T.20    Introduction to Proof: Sets and Functions1 credit

Prerequisites:MAT-151 or higher with a minimum grade of C.

Methods of mathematical proof will be introduced using concepts from sets and functions. Topics may include: the basics of set theory including equivalence relations, cardinality (including the notions of countability and uncountability), and topics covering surjective, injective, bijective, and inverse functions.

MAT-299T.25   Introduction to Proof: Logic1 credit

Prerequisites:MAT-151 or higher with a minimum grade of C.

Methods of mathematical proof will be introduced using concepts from symbolic logic. Topics may include: an introduction to logical implication, quantifiers, contrapositive, and logical equivalence.

ATH-300   Anthropology and Art3 credits

A comparative study of aesthetics, artistic creation and the role of image, art, and artist in cultural context.

KIN-300   Applied Sport Psychology3 credits

A course designed to teach the basics of motivation to physical educators, coaches, sport participants and recreational professionals. The course will focus on individual differences as they apply to sport performance, emphasis on aggression, affiliation, motivation and personality traits of the sport participant.

EDU-300   Schools & Society3 credits

This course is concerned with exploring the relationship between school and society. Informed by the disciplines of anthropology and sociology, we will explore the following questions: What purposes do schools serve in contemporary America? How have American schools changed (or remained the same) over time? Why are American public schools organized the way they are? What subcultures are constructed in schools and how do they relate to the larger American culture? What counts as knowledge in schools? How do factors such as race, gender, and ethnicity impact schooling? Whose interests are served by previous and current movements for educational reform?

HIS-300   The United States Since 19453 credits

An analysis of the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the United States during the postwar boom of the 1950s, the turbulent civil rights and student movements of the 1960s, and the conservative reaction of the 1980s.

REL-300   Zen3 credits

Prerequisites:One course religion or philosophy

A study of the doctrines, practices and institutional formations of the meditation school of Mahayana Buddhism in China, Korea, Japan and the contemporary West. Emphasis will be placed upon the transmission/creation of the tradition in China, its transmission/re-creation in medieval Japan and its transmission/re-creation in the West after World War ll.

POE-300   Constitutional Law I3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

An examination of the principles of American constitutional law concerning allocation of powers through the study of Supreme Court decisions, the role of the judicial branch and judicial review, separation of powers, congressional and presidential powers and federalism.

JOURN-300   Feature Writing3 credits

Prerequisites:JOURN-200 and JOURN-201

Focuses on longer forms of nonfiction writing. The class reads historical selections that demonstrate the growth and importance of Journalism in our society. Students select an area of interest and focus on it throughout the term.

CHE-301   Organic Chemistry I3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-142 and CHE-142L, Mininum grade of C or equivalent

Corequisites:CHE-301L

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon. Study includes structure, nomenclature, typical reaction of functional groups, spectroscopy, structure reactivity relationships, synthesis and mechanisms of reactions. Three hours of lecture and one 3 1/2 hour laboratory weekly.

EDU-301   Foundations of Schooling3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-202

An exploration of the various disciplines that are foundational in understanding American education. The course is interdisciplinary in that it explores the philosophical, social, political, and historical issues and ideas that have informed the growth and development of education in America.

HIS-301   History of American Ideas3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

An analysis of movements of continuing influence in American social and political thought from the colonial period to the 20th century.

PHY-301   Theoretical Mechanics3 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-272 and MAT-352

A survey of classical and modern topics in dynamics. Topics include orbital mechanics, non-inertial reference frames, rigid-body motion, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods, and elements of nonlinear mechanics and chaos.

MUS-301   Counterpoint2 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-103

A study in musical material and techniques from the 18th century with an introduction to contrapuntal music through analysis, written exercise and listening.

PSY-301   Development of Personality3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-101 & junior standing.

A study of the classical and contemporary theories of personality development.

SPE-301   Oral Argumentation3 credits

Prerequisites:SPE-101

The course will identify and explain the concepts students must know and the steps they must take when constructing an argument. The course will emphasize argumentation as a communicative activity in which students advance claims and their grounds, then strengthen and refine them using compelling evidence that will resist the refutation of others. Real life application of the theories of argumentation will be stressed along with the importance of academic debate of current social issues. Students will participate in debates and presentations designed to build their skills in argumentation. Students will also be tested on their understanding of argumentation models starting with Aristotle and the Greeks, then concluding with Chomsky and other modern critics of rhetoric.

POE-301   Constitutional Law II3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

An examination of the principles of American constitutional law concerning civil liberties and civil rights through the study of Supreme Court decisions: due process, rights of the accused, equal protection, freedom of expression and freedom of religion.

JOURN-301   Advanced Editing and Reporting3 credits

Prerequisites:JOURN-200 and JOURN-201

Explores the work of editors and journalists through focused readings and hands-on writing and editing assignments. Longer features and pieces of literary journalism are read and studied. Students study and analyze the work of major nonfiction writers and do hands-on editing of their own and their classmates work. Critical papers will look at the changes that journalism is undergoing because of the Internet, through Websites, Weblogs and online magazines.

MS-301   Leadership & Management3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A study of tactics and skills which increases students' poise and confidence as military trainers and leaders. Students learn the techniques of effective counseling, training and management in a military environment. Laboratory consists of progressive participation in advanced leadership exercises and practical application of basic tactics and patrolling skills.

CHE-301L   Organic Chemistry I Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-142 and CHE-142L with a mininum grade of C or equivalent.

Corequisites:CHE-301

Required laboratory course for CHE-301. One 3.5 laboratory weekly.

ATH-302   Ritual, Myth and World View3 credits

An anthropological approach to religious meaning and ritual in small-scale societies and ethnic subcultures. The course analyzes theories of religion, myth, and ritual by comparing cultures in various areas of the world, including contemporary crisis and change.

ART-302   Drawing the Portrait3 credits

Prerequisites:ART-130 or instructor approved studio experience.

This studio course explores traditional and experimental approaches to portraiture. Students will consider a variety of issues including the factors contributing to a likeness, and the presentation of public versus private images of the sitter. A variety of media will be used, and some art-critical reading may be required.

CHE-302   Organic Chemistry II3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-301 and CHE-301L

Corequisites:CHE-302L

A continuation of the study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon. Topics include structure, nomenclature, typical reaction of functional groups, structure reactivity relationships, spectroscopy, synthesis and mechanisms of reactions. Three hours of lecture weekly.

HIS-302   History of U.S. Foreign Policy3 credits

A study of American foreign policy from 1776 until the present.

SOC-302   Gender and Society3 credits

An introduction to the study of gender as a basic organizing principle in primarily industrial societies. Includes theories of gender development, sex and gender differences, gender socialization, inequalities in productive and reproductive spheres, and prospects for change.

THE-302   Applied Theatre: Lighting1 credit

Prerequisites:THE-240 and instructor permission.

By contract. Stage lighting practicum in a creative leadership capacity linked to production. Practical application of acquired knowledge. A written report of the process is required.

POE-302   Economic Development3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-263

Students pursuing other majors must have attained junior standing and have permission of instructor. An examination of the characteristics of underdeveloped nations, what factors contribute to their relative poverty, particular development problems they face, and policies for alleviating these problems.

MS-302   Basic Tactics3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A continuation of MS-301. Refines the fundamentals of patrolling and combat operations. Prepares students for participation at the National Advanced Leadership camp. Laboratory consists of practical application of basic tactics and patrolling skills.

ASN-302.1   Southeast Asia: Traditions and Transitions2 credits

This course is a prerequisite for the winter off-campus study course ASN-302.2 of the same name. Preparation for off-campus study is emphasized through directed readings, discussion, and paper writing.

ASN-302.2   Southeast Asia: Traditions and Transitions4 credits

Prerequisites:ASN-302.1 and instructor permission

This winter term course is an off-campus interdisciplinary study of Southeast Asian countries emphasizing history, culture and political economy. Over four weeks of the course are spent in Southeast Asia where cross-country study centers on thematic topics. The topics and countries visited vary from year-to-year according to the selected theme. Course readings typically include scholarly texts, personal memoirs, and travel literature.

ATH-302A   Cultural Diversity3 credits

Examination of American cultural diversity through the perspective of Cultural Anthropology. Students are required to complete the readings for ATH-202 and attend that class. In addition, students will be assigned formal readings, written examinations and final papers appropriate to the 300 level. Students who have already completed ATH-202 are not allowed to enroll for ATH-302A.(Cross-listed with ATH-202)

CHE-302L   Organic Chemistry II Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-301 and CHE-301L

Corequisites:CHE-302

Required laboratory course for CHE-302. One 3.5 laboratory weekly.

HIS-303   The Terror: Radicalism, Language and Violence in the French Revolution, 1789-17953 credits

A study of rhetoric and reactionary politics in France during the Revolution. The course will focus on the conditions and culture that led to the transformative instances of revolutionary violence that have come to define the French Revolution.

BIO-303   Human Anatomy3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-303L

A study of the structures of the human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, renal, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive systems with emphasis on the interactions between body systems. Clinical applications will be emphasized. Laboratory activities include dissection of cats, sheep brains and hearts, and the study of a prosected human cadaver. This course is designed for pre-health professions students and any students interested in human biology.

THE-303   Applied Theatre: Costuming1 credit

Prerequisites:THE-211 and instructor permission.

By contract. Stage costuming practicum in a creative leadership capacity linked to production. Practical application of acquired knowledge plus a written report of the process.

BIO-303L   Human Anatomy Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-303

This is the laboratory course for BIO-303.

KIN-304   Motor Learning3 credits

A study focusing on motor development as it affects physical, psychological and neurological factors of acquiring and developing motor skills. This course also provides a theoretical and practical basis for developing effective teaching/coaching strategies.

EDU-304   Literacy Development3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-202, PSY-221, and full or provisional admission to the teacher education program.

A survey of the development of reading in American schools. Students will be introduced to current theories of literacy development as well as gain functional familiarity with methods of teaching reading at both elementary and secondary levels. Involves 12 hours of observation, tutoring, and teaching in a K-12 setting.

HIS-304   The American Westward Movement3 credits

An introduction to the political, diplomatic, social, economic and cultural events and consequences that occurred between 1607 and the present as Americans moved west.

BIO-304   Human Physiology3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-141 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-304L

A study of the physiology and morphology of human cells, tissues and organs, with emphasis on selected human organ systems. Three lectures/discussion and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

THE-304   Applied Theatre: Management1 credit

Prerequisites:THE-260 and instructor permission.

By contract. Theatre management practicum in connection with a main stage production. It focuses on the practical application of acquired knowledge and requires a written report of the production management process.

SOC-304   The Sociology of Religion3 credits

This course provides students with an opportunity to: 1) gain an overview of the world's major religious traditions from a sociological perspective; 2) explore different facets of "religiosity," including belief, behavior, and identity from a sociological perspective; and 3) consider influential sociological theoretical perspectives on the causes and consequences of various types of religiosity.

POE-304.3   The Presidential Election of 20083 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

An examination of the issues and strategies employed in presidential elections. Emphasis will be placed on decision making and problem solving in a small-group environment.

BIO-304L   Human Physiology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-141 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-304

This is the laboratory for BIO-304.

ATH-305   Culture Change and the World System3 credits

An anthropological approach to culture change and development. This course will examine cultural systems affected by development from colonial and post-colonial agencies and the impact of those changes in small-scale and state societies.

EDU-305   Literacy in Content Areas3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-202, PSY-221, and full or provisional admission to the teacher education program.

A study of methods and strategies used to implement reading into content area subjects at elementary and secondary levels. Involves 20 hours of observation, tutoring, and teaching in a K-12 setting.

POE-305   Theories of Democracy1 credit

Prerequisites:Junior standing

The concept of democracy has been evaluated and debated since the early days of the Greek city states. What is meant by democracy? What are the criteria necessary for the establishment and execution of a viable democracy? Throughout his career, Robert Dahl has explored these issues. This course will examine the meaning of democracy as formulated by Dahl in his writings. We will discuss Dahl's writings in detail and explore our own views of democracy. We will also closely examine the writings of Peter Bachrach, a continuing critic of Robert Dahl. The success of this course will depend upon the participation of the students involved and their dedication to examining the concept of democracy through directed readings and in-depth class discussion.

THE-305.1   Applied Theatre: Acting1 credit

Prerequisites:THE-215 and instructor permission.

By contract. Acting practicum linked to a main stage or senior project production. Practical application of acquired knowledge plus a written report of the process.

IND-305.1   Winter Wilderness Experience2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

The Winter Wilderness Experience (WWE), an off-campus program based in the Sawtooth Mountains of Stanley, Idaho, is an interdisciplinary and experiential program in the study of place. Primary instruction focuses on environmental literature, creative writing, wilderness studies (literary, historical, and philosophical), and outdoor skills (backcountry skiing, avalanche safety, and snow camping). Secondary emphases of WWE include winter ecology, public land policy, cultural geography, and leadership and group management skills. Students take a 2-credit preparatory course during the fall term before the 4-credit winter course. As determined by the instructors in consultation with each student, 3 of the 6 WWE credits can fulfill the ENG 299T requirement within the Literature in English major/minor, the ENG 220 requirement within the Creative Writing major/minor, or the 3-credit social science requirement within the Environmental Studies major/minor. In addition, 2 credits can go toward Leadership and 1 credit can go toward P.E. Student admission to WWE is determined by formal applications as well as personal interviews.

IND-305.2   Winter Wilderness Experience credits

Prerequisites:IND-305.1 and permission.

The Winter Wilderness Experience (WWE), an off-campus program based in the Sawtooth Mountains of Stanley, Idaho, is an interdisciplinary and experiential program in the study of place. Primary instruction focuses on environmental literature, creative writing, wilderness studies (literary, historical, and philosophical), and outdoor skills (backcountry skiing, avalanche safety, and snow camping). Secondary emphases of WWE include winter ecology, public land policy, cultural geography, and leadership and group management skills. Students take a 2-credit preparatory course during the fall term before the 4-credit winter course. As determined by the instructors in consultation with each student, 3 of the 6 WWE credits can fulfill the ENG 299T requirement within the Literature in English major/minor, the ENG 220 requirement within the Creative Writing major/minor, or the 3-credit social science requirement within the Environmental Studies major/minor. In addition, 2 credits can go toward Leadership and 1 credit can go toward P.E. Student admission to WWE is determined by formal applications as well as personal interviews.

ATH-306   Visual Anthropology3 credits

A study of social documentary photography and ethnography, which examines society and culture through visual images rather than words or written texts. Students will learn the basics of photography and anthropology, and undertake ethnographic assignments.

HIS-306   The American South Since 18653 credits

A study of the American South from the defeat of the Confederacy in 1865 until the election of a Southern president in 1976. The course will also examine the history of African-Americans in the South from emancipation until the civil rights movements of the 1960s.

BIO-306   Conservation Biology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Application of scientific principles to conservation of biological diversity, with emphasis on patterns and explanations for diversity, threats to and value of diversity, habitat relationships and extinction processes, and conservation strategies.

THE-306   Applied Theatre: Scenery1 credit

Prerequisites:THE-240 and instructor permission.

By contract. Scenery practicum in a creative leadership capacity linked to production. Practical application of acquired knowledge plus a written report of the process.

EDU-306   Writing Process & Assessment 3 credits

Teacher candidates in the Literacy minor will develop the ability to design writing instruction appropriate to meet the needs of K-12 students and aligned to the common core standards. Candidates will be able to model the writing process and assess student writing.

ENG-307   Origins and Traditions of English Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:ENG-200-level literature course(any version)

A survey of landmark poetry and prose from the Anglo-Saxon Era to the Enlightenment, with special emphasis on how the assumptions, concerns, and techniques of these texts came to be seen as the kernel of a coherent national literary tradition.

POE-307   The Legislative Process3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

An examination of the legislative process within the United States with special emphasis on the unique characteristics of the U. S. Congress and the Idaho State Legislature.

IND-307.1   London: Art, History, & Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course is a prerequisite for the winter session off-campus study course IND-307.2 of the same name. An interdisciplinary study of the art, history, and literature of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century London as reflected in the literature, memoirs, and art of the day.IND-307.1 may be applied to the following majors and minors: the art major, the art history minor, the English minor or major, the history major or minor, and the British studies minor.

IND-307.2   London: Art, History, & Literature4 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

An interdisciplinary study of the art, history, and literature of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century London as reflected in the literature, memoirs, and art of the day. Approximately three weeks of winter term will be spent in London. IND-307.2 may be applied to the following majors and minors: the art major, the art history minor, the English major or minor, the history major or minor, and the British studies minor. Students who wish to apply more than three credits from IND-307.1 and IND-307.2 towards their majors (or minors with the exception of British Studies) must speak to course instructors by the end of the first week of IND 307.1 for further information.

ATH-308   Gender in Cross Cultural Perspective3 credits

An examination of the concept of gender, or the meaning of being and behaving male or female through cross-cultural case studies. The course will include cultural roles and statuses and their structural positions and representations.

ENG-308   Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson3 credits

Prerequisites:ENG-200-level literature course(any version)

This course will study the three most influential dramatists of the Elizabethan and Jacobean theater, each of whom responded complexly to the example of his predecessor. In addition to reading some of the plays and poems by each man that respond to, or elicit response from, one of the others, we will also consider the social, theatrical, and literary milieu which made such a convergence of talent possible.

HIS-308   The War in Vietnam and America in the 1960s3 credits

A study of the diplomacy and conduct of America's military involvement in Southeast Asia, 1956-1975. The course will also include a study of the domestic turbulence caused by that involvement, specifically focusing on the antiwar movement.

MUS-308   Performing Britannia and Celtica: The Music of Britain3 credits

A survey of the literature and history of the music of Britain, with a particular focus given to English and Scottish music. A range of music is studied, including classical, folk, and modern Celtic music, with emphasis being given to the context and function of music in its various settings. The course involves intensive researching and writing. The ability to read/perform music is not a prerequisite, although a background in music will benefit students taking the course.

ATH-309   Cross-Cultural Approaches to the Environment3 credits

A cross-cultural examination of environmental development and ideological constructs from selected case studies of non-industrial societies in the Americas and Africa. The course will examine adaptation to the environment as shaping social structure and ideology, as well as how ideology shapes the society's environmental use.

HIS-309   The American Civil War3 credits

An introduction to the causes, conduct and consequences of the rebellion of the South, 1861 to 1865.

PHI-309   Feminist Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

A study of topics in feminist philosophy, which may include political theory and ethics.

ENG-309   The Epic Tradition3 credits

Prerequisites:ENG-200-level literature course(any version)

This course considers how the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid modeled supreme literary achievement in Europe for more than two millennia, and how postclassical European writers wrestled with this daunting, but also inspiring, legacy of classical epic.

POE-309    The American Presidency3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

The course will concentrate on the institution of the presidency and how it interacts with other entities and the formal and informal powers available to the president.

PHI-310   Ancient Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

A survey of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Aristotle.

PSY-310   Applied Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-101 & MAT-112 or MAT-212

Introduction to the application of statistics in behavioral science research with emphasis on quantitative methods. Topics include sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. The course focus will be on the statistical methods used in experimental and quasi-experimental research designs.

POE-310   Mock Supreme Court3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A study of politics, personalities, and institutional norms of the Supreme Court, primarily through role playing and intensive research, writing, and oral argument.

THE-310   Costume Design3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-201 and THE-240

Costume Design is an essential part of the theatrical experience. The clothing an actor wears is another color in the theatrical palette that can reinforce time, place and style. By developing strong artistic choices through patterns, draping and fashion history, the costumer works with the artistic team in creating a unified environment that enhances the story being told. Students will learn how to evolve a character from the written text to a color rendering. Costume history and various rendering mediums will be explored.

HIS-311   To Kill a King: The English Civil War 1638-16593 credits

An examination of the English political crisis leading from the popish plot and constitutional breakdown to the beheading of Charles I and the rise of the Commonwealth and Protectorate under Oliver Cromwell.

MAT-311   Probability & Mathematical Statistics I3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

A study of finite sample spaces, conditional probability and independence, functions of random variables, random variables of one or more dimensions, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, moment generating functions, sampling distribution, estimation and testing of hypotheses.

BIO-311   Molecular Biotechnology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-311L

This course introduces techniques used in nucleic acid and protein expression technologies and their applications in forensics, conservation biology, environmental microbiology, medical diagnostics and basic research. Topics covered include: nucleic acid isolation and purification, PCR techniques, cloning tools and strategies, hybridization technologies, and an introduction to protein expression systems used in research and industry. Bioinformatics modules acquaint students with informational databases (NCBI, OMIM, FlyBase) and enable them to use tools for interpretation and manipulation of sequence data.

MUS-311   Music History I3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-104.1

An introduction to the history and literature of European music from antiquity to 1750. Students engage in critical thinking about the contexts of historical performances and practices and develop writing and researching skills regarding music.

PHI-311   Modern Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

A survey of Western philosophy from Hobbes to Kant.

POE-311   The Federalists & Anti-Federalists3 credits

This course will examine the arguments made by both proponents and opponents of the constitution and determine their applicability to current political debates.

THE-311   Lighting Design3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-201 and THE-240

Stage lighting functions to make the actors and their environs visible to the audience. It can also evoke the appropriate mood, indicate time of day and location, shift emphasis from one stage area to another, reinforce the style of the production, make objects on stage appear flat or three dimensional and blend the visual elements on stage into a unified whole. This course covers the fundamental tools of the lighting designer, preparing for the theatre space, and production techniques. The course explores the translating of theatrical moments into lighting sketches, storyboards, and atmospheres, as well as the transitions from one atmosphere to another and developing points of view.

FRE-311   French Composition and Conversation I 3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101 and FRE-212

The first in a sequence of two semesters designed to foster improvement of functional skills with particular emphasis on writing, listening, and speaking. Development of techniques to explain, elaborate, support opinions, convince, and persuade in both writing and speaking.

BIO-311L   Molecular Biotechnology1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-330 and BIO-330L

This is the laboratory course for BIO-311.

KIN-312   Health Related Fitness and Exercise Prescription3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-201, BIO-202, CHE-141, KIN-102 and MAT-111 or higher. MAT-112 or MAT-212 is preferred.

A course of study that will exam the rationale for testing, risk stratification and risk factors, patient screening, contraindications to testing, lead systems/prepping, conducting the exercise test (patient instructions, informed consent, flow of test), testing modalities/protocals, metabolic calculations, interpretation of GXT results, when to stop testing, nuclear testing, pharmacological testing, exercise echocardiography, medications, crash cart and emergency medications, exercise prescription (Basics, Environmental concerns, Phase I-IV, Special Populations (LVdysfunction, transplants, diabetes, COPD, PVD, pregnancy, and PCTA). Case studies and station examinations will be used for evaluation.

MAT-312   Probability & Mathematical Statistics II3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-311 with a minimum grade of C.

A continuation of MAT-311. A study of finite sample spaces, conditional probability and independence, functions of random variables, random variables of one or more dimensions, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, moment generating functions, sampling distribution, estimation and testing of hypotheses.

MUS-312   Music History II3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-104

An introduction to the history and literature of European music from 1750 to the present. Students engage in critical thinking about the contexts of historical performances and practices and develop writing and researching skills regarding music.

PSY-312   Research Design & Analysis I3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-101 and MAT-112 or MAT-212

Corequisites:PSY-312L

An introduction to scientific research methods used in psychology. Includes use of the professional literature of psychology, laboratory experience, and report writing. Course and lab must be taken concurrently.

POE-312   Macroeconomic Policy3 credits

An examination of macroeconomic policy in the United States from the perspective of the policy process. The course will include study of the Federal Reserve Board, the budget making process of the Congress and executive branches, and macroeconomic theories.

FRE-312   French Composition and Conversation II3 credits

Prerequisites:FRE-311

The second in a sequence of two semesters designed to foster improvement of functional skills with particular emphasis on writing, listening, and speaking. Development of techniques to explain, elaborate, support opinions, convince, and persuade in both writing and speaking.

PSY-312L   Research Design & Analysis I Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:PSY-101 and MAT-112 or MAT-212

Corequisites:PSY-312

This is the laboratory course for PSY-312.

PHY-313   Thermal Physics3 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-272

Physical basis and applications of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics including temperature, heat, heat engines, entropy, and free energy. The course also includes an introduction to Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics and their application to the solution of thermal, mechanical and electrical problems in fluids and solids.

PSY-313   Research Design & Analysis II3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-312

Corequisites:PSY-313L

This course focuses on more advanced research analysis. Extensive laboratory experience and report writing are required. Students will design, execute, and analyze an independent research project.

PSY-313L   Research Design & Analysis II Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:PSY-312

Corequisites:PSY-313

Lab section to accompany PSY-313.

KIN-314   Research Methods in Kinesiology3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-111 or higher. MAT-112 or higher is preferred.

An analysis of and practice in measurement of physical activity as it relates to Physical Education and Exercise Science. The course focus is the development and implementation of the research/scientific method, to include but not limited to literature retrieval , process, components, formulate the research problem and methods, interpretation of information and the selection of an appropriate statistical package. Written work to include but not limited to papers, projects and poster presentations.

PSY-314   Qualitative Research Methods3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-312

An introduction to the application of qualitative research methods commonly used in psychology and related fields. Students will explore the nature of qualitative research, qualitative research designs, methods for collecting qualitative data, analysis of qualitative results, and the presentation of those findings.

HIS-314   Tudor and Stuart England3 credits

This course will explore the various political, religious, and cultural changes which England experienced under the reign of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. Emphases will include domestic and international political conflicts, England's involvement in the European Reformation during the sixteenth century, and the age of rebellion and revolution during the seventeenth century. (Research Intensive)

ART-315   Printmaking3 credits

Prerequisites:ART-100, ART-130 or Instructor permission

A study of monoprints, block prints, and intaglio prints. A variety of techniques and concepts, including etching and dry point, will be explored.

ENG-315   The Supernatural in British Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:ENG-200-level literature course(any version)

Full Title: Ghostie and Ghoulies and Long-Leggedy Beasties: the Supernatural in British Literature. By examining the specters that have haunted the last two hundred years of British fiction, this course will explore the applicability of the supernatural as a vehicle for expressing transgressions against cultural and literary conventions. Canonical and non-canonical authors have imaginatively and effectively summoned the supernatural to animate tensions embedded in class structure, gender and family dynamics, imperial possessions, science and religion, realism and fantasy, and the permeability of language.

THE-315   Principles of Directing3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215. THE-240 and THE-260 are recommended.

Theory and practice in staging a play, including performance analysis, composition, picturization, movement, pantomime dramatization, tempo and pace, rehearsal techniques and problem solving.

BIO-316   Genetics3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

This course incorporates both classical and molecular approaches to study the structure and function of DNA, genes, chromosomes, the genome, and gene expression. Possible topics include, but not limited to, classical genetic concepts, oncogenes and cancer; cloning and gene therapy; genomics, sex determination and sex chromosomes, genetic screening, and population genetics.

THE-316   Acting Period Styles3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215

An exploration in acting, emphasizing the importance of character in plays belonging to a period style including Shakespeare, Restoration Comedy and others such as Ancient Greek, Moliere and Coward. Students will gain knowledge and technique through combining scene work with period dance. Use of props and elements of costume may also be incorporated.

ENG-316   The Brontes3 credits

Prerequisites:ENG-200-level literature course(any version)

Emily, Charlotte, and Anne Bronte maintain a place among the most popular Victorian writers, and their lives have taken on a mystique of their own. This class will study their creative work within the contexts of nineteenth-century British culture, twentieth-century literary scholarship, and the phenomenon of persistent reinterpretations of their lives and environs.

KIN-317   Drug Use and Abuse3 credits

Students will examine the nature and characteristics of stimulants, depressants (including alcohol), hallucinogens, narcotics, tobacco, and volatile chemicals. They will study patterns of use and abuse as well as coping methods of treatment. The class will identify economic, cultural and social problems related to use and abuse and evaluate misconceptions.

ENG-317   Nineteenth-century British Fiction3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

In the nineteenth century, British fiction experienced a significant florescence. This course will acquaint students with major forms of nineteenth-century fiction including domestic realism, adventure-romance, fantasy, the gothic, and naturalism. We will study this literature in the context of nineteenth-century culture, particularly gender relations, perceptions of childhood, the tensions between individual desire and social norms, and the practices of literary production.

BIO-317   Stream Ecology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203

Corequisites:BIO-317L

This course examines the ecology of streams with an emphasis on the physical, chemical and biological organization of stream ecosystems. The course will also cover current theories in stream ecology. Students will learn laboratory and field methods for conducting stream research and will be expected to complete a field-based research project. Lectures and one four-hour laboratory weekly. Some weekend field trips are required.

BIO-317L   Stream Ecology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203

Corequisites:BIO-317

This laboratory is for course BIO-317.

KIN-318   Nutrition3 credits

A course designed to examine nutrition with specific concentration on metabolism, activity and diseases. Vitamins, minerals and other important nutrients and their functions will be studied.

ACC-318   Intermediate Accounting I3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222 and BUS-330

A comprehensive study of the theory, principles and procedures used in reporting financial information to decision makers via the balance sheet and statements of income, retained earnings and changes in financial position.

ENG-318   Prize Books3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

This course will examine British books in recent decades that have figured prominently in major literary competitions, exploring the role these awards play in shaping literary tastes and publishing trends. Readings will include a number of short-listed and prize-winning books, book reviews, and commentaries on these celebrated contests. Throughout the semester, we will consider the place these books may assume in future assessments and studies of the most influential and significant books of our era.

KIN-319   Mechanical Analysis of Sport3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-104 or BIO-303 and MAT-111 or higher. MAT-112 or is higher preferred.

A study of the structure and movement patterns of the human body with emphasis on structural design and synergistic action of muscles. The course includes a review of the relationship of human movement to the physical laws of the environment.

ENG-319   19th-Century Literature of the British Isles3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

This survey will concentrate primarily on fiction and poetry from the beginnings of Romanticism to fin de siecle decadence and naturalism. Attention will be given to literary texts' power to reflect and shape British culture in the nineteenth century, a period which many observers, including the American Mark Twain, believed experienced more change than any previous century. We will also explore the impact shifting literary tastes and critical approaches have played in texts' and authors' reception and popularity.

BIO-319   Ichthyology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-319L

A study of the evolution, classification, anatomy, and physiology of marine and freshwater fishes. Two lectures and one four-hour laboratory weekly. Some weekend field trips required.

BIO-319L   Ichthyology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-319

The laboratory is for course BIO-319.

ACC-320   Intermediate Accounting II3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-318

A comprehensive study of the theory, principles and procedures used in reporting financial information to decision makers via the balance sheet and statements of income, retained earnings and changes in financial position.

ENG-320   20th Century Literature of the British Isles3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

A survey of prominent texts of the twenty-first century. Authors studied may include Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Beckett, Heaney, Muriel Spark, Ian McEwan, and Ali Smith.

HIS-320   Ancient Latin Language and Literature I3 credits

An introduction to the basics of Latin grammar and syntax with emphasis on translating classical Latin literature.

THE-320   Theatre History I3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-115 is recommended

A survey of world theatre history from 5000 B.C. to 1642, including the reading of representative plays.

PSY-320   Advanced Topics in Cognition3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-203

In this course, a specific area of cognition will be examined at greater depth. Topics will vary from year to year and may include areas such as Sensation & Perception, Memory, Attention and Complex Cognition. Students will learn the history, theories, and controversies within the chosen area through discussion of primary and secondary source articles.

ART-320   Advanced Studio Projects3 credits

Prerequisites:ART-130 and an introductory course appropriate to student's project

This advanced studio art course emphasizes the development of skills to create a substantial body of work that demonstrates technical competence, understanding of the chosen medium, effective composition, stylistic and thematic unity, conceptual sophistication and an understanding of how the work relates to art historical traditions. Students may choose to explore in depth ceramics, sculpture, drawing, painting, printmaking or mixed media. Skills in critical analysis will be developed through bi-weekly class critiques of student artwork, assigned readings, discussion of work of major artists, and written self-assessments. Before enrolling in this class, students must complete a basic studio course in their project's medium. Course may be repeated twice with a different project or medium.

PHI-320   Analytic Philosophy3 credits

A study of contemporary philosophy. The course will begin with early Analytic Philosophy and conclude with contemporary work on problems such as philosophy of mind and meta-ethics. Post-Modern Philosophy is not covered in this course.

SOC-320   Family Sociology3 - 3 credits

A study of the history of the family and family systems in primarily industrial societies. Includes romantic love and mate selection, marriage and parenting, family dysfunction, and the criteria for marital success.

IND-320.1   Scotland & the Lake District: The Humanities of Place2 credits

This spring term course is a prerequisite for the summer off-campus study course IND-320.2 of the same name. It consists of classroom coursework intended to provide students with an introductory understanding of the history, geography, culture, literature, music, and art of northern England and Scotland. The Scotland and Lake District trip is an interdisciplinary study of place and culture through the lenses of music, literature, and art. The 3-week program in May will emphasize cultural, national, and geographical comparisons among three distinct regions of northern Britain: the Lake District of northwest England, the Lowlands of southern Scotland, and the Highlands and islands of northern Scotland. Generally, students may apply no more than three credits from IND-320.1 and IND-320.2 towards the following majors and minors: music minor, art major, art history minor, Literature in English minor, Literature in English major, or the British Studies minor. In the case of Literature in English, these three credits constitute the equivalent work load and credit as an ENG 200-level course.

IND-320.2   Scotland & the Lake District: The Humanities of Place4 credits

Prerequisites:IND-320.1

The Scotland and Lake District trip is an interdisciplinary study of place and culture through the lenses of music, literature, and art. The 3-week program in May will emphasize cultural, national, and geographical comparisons among three distinct regions of northern Britain: the Lake District of northwest England, the Lowlands of southern Scotland, and the Highlands and islands of northern Scotland. Generally, students may apply no more than three credits from IND-320.1 and IND-320.2 towards these majors or minors: music minor, art major, art history minor, Literature in English minor, Literature in English major, or the British Studies minor. In the case of Literature in English, these three credits constitute the equivalent work load and credit as an ENG 200 course.

HIS-321   Ancient Latin Language and Literature II3 credits

Prerequisites:HIS-320

A study of the basics of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Students will translate passages from ancient Latin authors as well as read several Latin literary works in translation. Such selections may include Ovid, Vergil, Cicero, and Tacitus. Consideration will also be given to Latin history, art history, and society.

THE-321   Theatre History II3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-115 is recommended

A survey of world theatre history from 1642 to present day, including the reading of representative plays

POE-321   Comparative Economics3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-263

An evaluation of economies from an historical, evolutionary perspective. Emphasis is given to the evolution of the 19th century laissez faire market economy and the 20th century variations, which have evolved in countries such as France and Japan.

ART-321   Graphic Design Studio3 credits

Prerequisites:ART-201 and ART-202

This advanced course focuses on the development of professional skills and techniques of visual communication using Adobe Creative Suite. Students complete independent projects in digital imaging, print or web design. Course may be repeated twice for credit with different projects.

PHI-321   Topics in Continental Philosophy3 credits

A study of one or more selected problems or figures from post-Kantian philosophy, primarily from the European continent. May be repeated with permission.

GER-321   German Composition and Conversation I3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101 and GER-224

The first in a sequence of two semesters designed to increase lexicon, to refine accuracy of linguistic forms, and to develop competency in language functions: to explain, elaborate, support opinions, convince, and persuade. The course integrates cultural studies using all skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with emphasis on academic writing.

ENG-322   V. S. Naipaul & Salman Rushdie3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

An intensive study of the works of two major authors in postcolonial studies. Originally from the former British colonies and celebrated as Britain's finest contemporary authors, Naipaul and Rushdie are paradoxically housed and unhoused men. Speaking as decentered men, these authors explore and critique the legacies of colonialism and the birth pangs of postcolonial nationhood with force, humor, play, and melancholia, and along the way celebrate cultural confusion, fragmentation, hybridity, the cosmopolitan, and the reclaiming of self.

HIS-322   Latin Readings1 credit

Prerequisites:HIS-320

Reading and translation of Latin texts selected to meet student needs and interests. May be repeated for credit.

POE-322   Comparative Economics II3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-263

An evaluation of alternative types of economies such as those of Sweden, the European Union, China and the transforming Central and East European nations.

GER-322   German Composition and Conversation II3 credits

Prerequisites:GER-321

The second in a sequence of two semesters designed to increase lexicon, to refine accuracy of linguistic forms, and to develop competency in language functions: to explain, elaborate, support opinions, convince, and persuade. The course integrates cultural studies using all skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with emphasis on academic speaking.

BIO-322.1   Field Botany3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202 or BIO-129

Corequisites:BIO-322.1L

Field based investigation of diversity, history, and adaptations of plants with emphasis on local examples. Methods of taxonomic identification and classification emphasized. Two lectures and one four-hour laboratory period weekly. Some weekend field trips are required. When taught in the Summer Session, day-long and overnight field trips are required.

BIO-322.1L   Field Botany1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-202 or BIO-129

Corequisites:BIO-322.1

The lab section for BIO-322.1

ACC-323   Electronic Accounting & Analysis3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-221

This course is an introduction to electronic accounting and simulation analysis. Students will utilize computer packages in both areas, through "hands on" exercises, to develop and report information and strategies for managerial consideration.

ENG-323   Postcolonial Studies3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version

An intensive foundational study of colonial and postcolonial African, Arab, Persian, South Asian, and Caribbean literatures from 1800s to present, with focus on anti-colonial movements and the idealism of nationhood, euphoria of independence, and the chaotic reality of failed or emergent nation-states. Students will study the conflicted and contradictory roles played by the architects and visionaries of new postcolonial nations, the construction and deconstruction of colonized man and of ethnic identities, and the repercussions of neocolonialism.

ART-324   Picasso and 20th Centruy Art3 credits

Students will examine the major contributions Pablo Picasso made to Cubism, Surrealism, and Modernist Abstraction. Themes of eroticism, popular culture, violence, and political protest in the artist's work will also be considered. Some prior art history or upper-level humanities or social sciences course work is recommended.

KIN-324   Management of PE, Recreation and Athletics2 credits

Underlying philosophy, principles, policies and procedures of administration as applied to health, physical education, recreation and athletics. The course includes leadership techniques, long-range planning, budgeting, purchasing, facilities planning and care, curriculum development, legal liability, public relations and evaluation.

ENG-324   Narratives Against Oppression3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

This course focuses on the social justice and human rights activism aspect of postcolonial studies. Students will examine how authors from around the world use literature to comment upon, protest, or record various forms of oppression. Such literature is written in order to inspire people to see and know the world in which they live, and to that end, the course will includde contemproary politics and world affairs. Topics may include the so-called War on Terror, civil rights movements, immigration rights, environmental activism, worker rights, globalization, neoliberalism, and the fight against poverty.

ENV-324   Environmental Studies Overseas Preparation1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course serves to prepare students for winter study abroad and provides an introduction to the cultural and natural history, ecology, and specific environmental concerns of the winter term trip destination.

ART-325   Art of the Romantic Era3 credits

A survey of western art from the mid-Eighteenth century to the Napoleonic period, focusing on the rise of Romantic individualism, and its importance for the art of our time. Some prior art history or upper-level humanities or social sciences course work is recommended.

ENG-325   Constructing World Literatures3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

A study of nonwestern authors from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East as their works intersect, counter, or complement American and British academic and popular representations of non-White cultures and histories. Topics studied may include Arab and Persian literary genres, anti-colonial and anti-imperial movement, and American and British immigrant and transnational diasporic narratives.

HIS-325   Ancient Greek Language and Literature I3 credits

A study of basic Classical and Hellenistic (Koine) Greek grammar and syntax, with primary involvement in the Greek New Testament. (Cross-listed as REL-325)

ENV-325   Natural History of Costa Rica3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Corequisites:ENV-326

Recommended: previous or concurrent Spanish study. This course introduces students to the geography, ecology, and natural history of selected Costa Rican ecosystems, with an emphasis on identifying, describing, and interpreting natural phenomena such as the behavior of birds and spatial and temporal changes in plant and animal communities. Readings will include selections from such writers as Janzen, Kricher, and Kingsolver. Students will keep extensive journals of their natural history observations and interpretations, and will produce their own creative nonfiction based on their journals. NOTE: Completion of this course of study will satisfy the following elective categories in the following majors: 1. Environmental Studies major, Conservation Biology focus: one lab course in Systematics or one lab course in Ecology (4 credits) 2. Environmental Studies major, Global Studies focus: The elective category of "winter session classes, winter College of Idaho overseas study trips, or immersion study abroad" (3 credits) 3. Biology major: "Elective upper-division courses" (3 credits).

REL-325   Ancient Greek Language and Literature I3 credits

A study of basic Classical and Hellenistic (Koine) Greek grammar and syntax with primary involvement in the New Testament.

BUS-325   Principles of Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100 and Sophomore standing

This course is a comprehensive study of the fundamentals of the management function and organizational behavior. Reviewing management models, organizational structure, work motivation, and selected management applications.

SOC-325   Social Interaction and Microsociology3 credits

Sociology is the study of society and social interaction. "Macrosociology" refers to the former, and "microsociology" refers to the latter. In this course, we will consider (1) what drives social interaction, (2) what makes interactions more or less successful, and (3) how small-scale social interactions impact large-scale social phenomena. Students will engage with the work of sociologists such as Georg Simmel, G.H. Mead, and Thomas Scheff. Special emphasis will be placed on the work of Erving Goffman as students examine in detail the dynamics of conformity and deviance. The course will culminate in a project where students observe and analyze social interactions in the local community.

HIS-326   Ancient Greek Language and Literature II3 credits

Prerequisites:HIS-325 or REL-325

A continuation of HIS-325 or REL-325 with a focus on the translation of selected Greek texts and the use of textual criticism. (Cross-listed as REL-326)

BIO-326   Coastal Marine Ecology4 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-326L

This course examines the ecology of coastal marine ecosystems (salt marshes, coral reefs, mangroves, sea grass beds, estuaries, barrier islands) with an emphasis on the physical, chemical, and biological organization of each system. The course will also cover current developments in coastal marine ecology, including discussion of human impacts on coastal systems. Lectures and an off-campus study component. Venues include but not limited to: Florida, Belize, the Caribbean, Hawaii.

ENV-326   Environmental Sustainability in the Tropics3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

In this course, students explore the difficulties and rewards of pursuing an environmentally sustainable culture, while focusing especially on two of Costa Rica's most pressing challenges: tourism and agriculture. Students will both be ecotourists by engaging in some of the typical tourist activities (e.g., zip-lining, rafting, canopy walks) and analyze the effects of their tourist activities. They will also explore the complexities of an economy and national identity based on ecotourism. In addition, students will observe and investigate the complexities of agriculture by studying both the implications of unchecked grazing and industrial agriculture, and the movement toward sustainable practices such as organic and polyculture farming. Students will complete a research project based on their studies.

REL-326   Ancient Greek Language & Literature II3 credits

Prerequisites:HIS-325 or REL-325

A continuation of REL-325 with a focus on the translation of selected Greek texts and the use of textual criticism.

BIO-326L   Coastal Marine Ecology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-324; BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-326

This is the laboratoryfor course BIO-326.

HIS-327   Greek Readings1 credit

Prerequisites:HIS-325 or REL-325

Readings and translation of Greek texts selected to meet student needs and interests. This course is designed to maintain and improve student proficiency in Greek. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits. (Cross-listed as REL-327)

MUS-327   Musical Theatre/Opera Workshop1 credit

An ensemble/applied course designed to give practical experience in musical theatrical arts through participation in the production as singer, actor or technician. Course may be repeated.

REL-327   Greek Readings1 credit

Prerequisites:HIS-326 or REL-326

Reading and translation of Greek texts selected to meet student needs and interests. This course is designed to maintain and improve student proficiency in Greek (may be repeated for a total of 4 credits).

ENV-327   Natural History of Belize4 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or Senior standing and permission

This course explores the natural habitats as well as the past and present cultures that make Belize unique. Through an intensive two week expeditionary-oriented approach, students will study tropical marine biology, rainforest ecology, geography, ecotourism, and Mayan and Garifuna culture. Incorporating sea kayaking, snorkeling, river running, and backcountry travel, students will be immersed in the rich biodiversity of the region and encounter firsthand the threats to tropical ecosystems. This course is open to students in all majors who have completed one year of Natural Science courses and one year of Social Science courses. Students selected based upon a competitive application process.

KIN-328   Elementary Curriculum Planning in Health & PE2 credits

Development of a curriculum in health and physical education with emphasis at the K-8 grade levels, understanding lifespan development of K-8 focusing on developing content in fundamental skills, assessment, observation, test writing, planning of grade appropriate and developmentally appropriate skills. Students will apply NASPE's national standards in developing unit and lesson plans.

HIS-328   Mythology: Classical History and Archaeology3 credits

An analysis of ancient Greek and Roman mythology in its historical, archaeological, literary, religious and cultural context. Primary readings include the Homer, selected Greek tragedies, and the Aeneid. (Research Intensive)

KIN-329   Secondary Curriculum Planning in PE2 credits

Development of a curriculum in physical education with emphasis at the 8-12 grade levels that focusing on fitness, wellness sport and lifetime activities to healthy lifestyle. Emphasis on unit planning, lesson plans, assessment, development of portfolios with class management and observation skills geared to working with all secondary students in a variety of settings and the application of NASPE's national standards in developing appropriate curriculum.

ENG-329   Inventing America3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

This course explores the making of "America" (focusing primarily on the United States) through literature, from the age of discovery through the post-Revolutionary period. Our primary purpose is to explore the means by which settlement and national identity were invented through language. Our texts feature a range of "literature," including transcribed Native American oral stories, colonial promotional tracts, sermons, speeches, captivity narratives, political pamphlets, personal letters, and slave narratives. The class will explore personal and cultural issues that concerned early Americans and discuss how texts both define and complicate some of the terms associated with the literature of this period, including "colonist," "Puritan," "Enlightenment," "liberty," and even "America" itself.

ART-330   Figure Drawing3 credits

Prerequisites:ART-100

A studio course focusing on traditional and innovative approaches to rendering the human figure. A variety of media will be used.

BUS-330   Principles of Finance3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222 and BUS-270 or POE-263

An introduction to finance with emphasis on the theories and problems of resource allocation, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, asset valuation, capital structures, and financial control.

ENG-330   African American Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

This course is a survey of the periods and movements of African American literature. Along the way, we seek to understand how African Americans have responded through literature to the oppressions of white America - slavery, segregation, violent and institutional racism - as well as how authors forge identity and create community through writing. We examine how these authors respond to their own literary tradition, how they shape form, style and genre in response to their historical context, and how they use writing as resistance, subversion, self-realization and celebration.

PHY-330   Electricity & Magnetism3 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-272 and MAT-352

An intermediate level survey of classical electro-magnetic theory including electrostatic and magnetostatic fields and potentials, Gauss' law, Laplace's equation, dielectrics, vector potentials, magnetization and Maxwell's equations.

BIO-330   Cell Biology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and CHE-141

Corequisites:BIO-330L

Introduction to the components of cells and processes that occur in living cells. Topics include cell structure and function, genetic events, regulation of gene expression, and the chemical pathways of metabolism. Readings, lectures, discussions, and laboratory activities. Three lectures and one three-hour lab weekly.

PSY-330   Introduction to Neuropsychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-202 & junior standing.

A systematic investigation of the structure and functions of the human brain. The course will focus equally on structural and functional explanations. Equal time will be spent on "normal" and "abnormal" brains.

SOC-330   Criminology and Deviance3 credits

A general survey of crime in the United States. Includes theories of crime and delinquency, societal responses to crime, and the social organization of correctional agencies. Includes field trips to local corrections institutions.

SPA-330   Spanish Composition and Conversation I3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101 and SPA-233 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

The first in a sequence of two semesters designed to increase lexicon, to refine accuracy of linguistic forms, and to develop competency in language functions: to explain, elaborate, support opinions, convince, and persuade. The course integrates cultural studies using all skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with emphasis on academic writing.

MUSAP-330   Applied Music0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Personalized private lessons on an instrument or in voice. Requires a minimum of three hours of practice weekly in addition to 30 minutes of instruction for each unit of credit. More practice may be required at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Extra fee.

BIO-330L   Cell Biology Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-330

This is the laboratory for course BIO-330.

ENG-331   Gardens of American Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

Vita Sackville-West once said, "The more one gardens, the more one learns." If this is the case, then a number of American authors must have been very wise individuals, since they were avid gardeners. In this course, we will consider the relationship between gardening, expression, and American literature. We will read a range of texts, including herbaria, records of natural phenomena, and "traditional" literature such as poetry and prose. We will also read scholarship devoted to literature and gardening. Authors may include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Susan Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Celia Thaxter, and Alice Walker.

HIS-331   Ancient Greece3 credits

A study of the political, economic and cultural development of the Greek world with readings from Greek authors in translation.

PHI-331   Ethics3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

A study of historical and contemporary works in ethical theory.

PSY-331   Introduction to Psychopharmacology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-312 & PSY-202

An introduction to the effects of drugs on the central nervous system and resulting effects on behavior.

BIO-331   Evolution3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 and BIO-330

The study of organic evolution as an organizing principle of biology, including a synthesis of principles of population genetics, paleontology, ecology, and molecular, developmental and organismal biology. Three lectures and one three-hour lab weekly plus a weekend field trip.

SPA-331   Spanish Composition and Conversation II credits

Prerequisites:SPA-330 or equivalent proficiency level demonstrated by placement test results

The second in a sequence of two semesters designed to increase lexicon, to refine accuracy of linguistic forms, and to develop competency in language functions: to explain, elaborate, support opinions, convince, and persuade. The course integrates cultural studies using all skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with emphasis on academic speaking.

BIO-331L   Evolution Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203L and BIO-330L

This is the laboratory course for BIO-331.

BUS-332   Financial Institutions3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-270 or POE-263

Analysis of financial markets and intermediaries including theory and practice in financial intermediation, the nature and function of money, interest rate theory, money and capital market instruments, monetary theory and policy, and government regulation.

ENG-332   Adrienne Rich3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version).

An intensive study of the works of one of the major American poets of the last half of the twentieth century and the first part of the twenty-first. The course will chart the progression of Rich's poetry as well as examine some of her works of nonfiction and critical theory, interrogating along the way some of Rich's key conceptualizations of nation, power, and women's sexuality.

HIS-332   Ancient Rome3 credits

A study of the history of Rome through the Republic and the Empire.

MUS-333   Vocal Pedagogy and Literature2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A study of vocal anatomy and health. Attention to specific components of voice production and technique: onset/phonation, posture and breath management, resonance, articulation, range and registration, coordination and interpretation. An overview of studio and class voice methods, and literature appropriate for a variety of voice classifications and levels of study.

ENG-333   Hemingway & Faulkner3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

This course pairs two literary giants of early 20th-century American modernism: Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. Although they lived in the same period and were both enormously influential for later writers in the U.S. and beyond, Hemingway and Faulkner had strongly contrasting prose styles. Studying them together in this course allows readers to understand their common roots in the innovations of modernism and American culture as well as what made their respective innovations radically distinct.

SPA-333   Literature of Latin America3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-331

A survey of major periods and genres through the works of representative Latin American authors.

ENG-334   Ecopoetics3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

This seminar will ask students to consider poets' experimentation with form in response to their understanding and experience of the natural world. How do poets express ecological ideas in poetry? Poets we consider may include Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Robinson Jeffers, Elizabeth Bishop, Richard Wilbur, Sylvia Plath, Gary Snyder, Seamus Heaney, A.R. Ammons, and Mary Oliver.

HIS-334   19th Century Europe: The Industrial Nation and its Discontents3 credits

An examination of European history in the years between 1815 and 1914. Special attention is given to politics and modern thought in France, Germany and Italy as nations struggled to achieve both industrial growth and domestic stability.(Research Intensive)

SPA-334   Literature of Spain3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-331

A survey of major periods and genres through the works of representative Spanish authors

ENG-335   The American Renaissance3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

This course explores the literary movement that scholars have designated as crucial to the development of a truly "American" literature, focusing roughly on the years 1836 to 1865. In addition to studying canonical authors, students will explore those writers who worked, in the words of one critic, "beneath" the American renaissance, focusing on issues of concern to women, Native Americans, and African Americans. Authors will include Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Whitman, and Lydia Maria Child.

HIS-337   Modern Russia and the USSR3 credits

An introduction to Russian political and social history from 1815 to the present.

MUS-337   Pract/Orchestral Lit Violin, Viola, Cello1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Specialized study of standard orchestral literature through a performance setting. May include group and individual study. Attention given to preparation of specific parts for violin, viola, or cello, as well as audition procedures and performance practices. This course may be repeated for credit. MUS-337F (Fall), MUS-337W (Winter), MUS-337S (Spring).

SPA-337   Spanish for Business I credits

Prerequisites:SPA-330 or SPA-331

A course that utilizes the context of business to develop Spanish communication skills and knowledge of current economic and socio-political issues in the Spanish-speaking world at large. Emphasis on macroeconomics.

HIS-338   Modern India3 credits

An introduction to the history and culture of the Indian subcontinent from 16th century Moghul domination to the modern experiences of the world's largest democracy. Special attention will be given to the impact and legacy of British rule and the response of an ancient eastern cultural and social system to the stresses of modernization.

ENG-338   Postmodern Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:200-level literature course (any version)

This course introduces students to major trends in postmodern fiction, including metafiction, deconstruction, carnival and play, pastiche and intertextuality, post-structuralism, fragmentation, and phenomenology, and uses postmodern philosophies to understand, among other topics, counter-cultural movements such as the cyber and the pop phenomena.

SPA-338   Spanish for Business II3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-337

A course that builds on Spanish for Business I to further develop Spanish communication skills and knowledge of current economic and socio-political issues in the Spanish-speaking world, specifically Latin America. Emphasis on microeconomics.

HIS-339   National Socialism and the Final Solution3 credits

An investigation of the political and racial theories of the Nazi Party, which led to the creation of the extermination camps in Europe, 1939 to 1945.

POE-339   Environmental Policy Analysis3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

This course will focus on the conceptual foundations of policy analysis as they relate to the area of environmental policy. Students will focus on both substantive environmental policies and methods for analyzing those policies. Special emphasis will be made on economic techniques of policy analysis.

BIO-339.1   Mammalogy3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or BIO-202 and ENV-260

Corequisites:BIO-339.1L

Biological principles as applied to mammals with emphasis on adaptations, behavior, evolution, classification, and ecological relationships. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory weekly. Some overnight field trips may be required.

BIO-339.1L   Mammalogy Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or BIO-202 and ENV-260

Corequisites:BIO-339.1

This is the laboratory for course BIO-339.

BUS-340   International Business3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-270 or POE 263

An analysis of international business from the viewpoint of entering into multinational business activities, examining cultural, social, economic, and political factors related to transnational operations.

HIS-340   Pre-Modern Chinese History3 credits

This course will examine the political, economic, and social history of the Chinese empire from its founding until the Ming dynasty.(Research Intensive)

PHI-340   Environmental Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101

A critical examination of environmental ethics and the philosophical theories on which they depend. Topics may include: animal welfare, utilitarianism, deep ecology, the land ethic and eco-feminism.

THE-340   Theatre Design3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-240

Principles and techniques for creating the stage environment through scenery. Includes theoretical concepts, presentation of the design idea and design technology culminating in the creation of a concrete design.

PSY-340   Psychology of Child Development3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-201 & junior standing

This course provides an advanced exploration of the psychology of child development from the prenatal period through late childhood. Topics covered include but are not limited to a critical analysis of historic and current trends in social, cognitive and language developmental theory and research relating to this life period.

CSC-340   Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 credits

Prerequisites: CSC-152. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

Study of algorithm design, implementation, and behavior analysis. Topics may include divide-and-conquer, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, sorting techniques, data structures and advanced data structures, and graph algorithms, including minimal spanning trees. Selected topics such as parallel/multithreaded algorithms may be covered as time permits.

SPA-340   National Traditions in the Spanish-Speaking World3 credits

This course considers the literature and cultural history of a particular Spanish-speaking country or countries. The role of literature and other cultural production in constructing the modern nation and local identities will be considered. Readings are in Spanish and may cover a variety of time periods, genres, and authors. A different country may be considered each time the course is taught, and the course may be repeated with instructor permission.

REL-340.   Topics in Religion1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:One course in religion

An examination of specific issues, themes or figures in religion. Topics vary from year to year. See Courses listed below.

ART-341   Modern Art: 1850-19403 credits

This course will cover the history of western art from Realism and Impressionism to the Surrealists. Movements to be considered include Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, Dada and Surrealism. Some prior art history or upper level humanities or social science course is recommended.

MUS-341   Beginning Conducting2 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-203 and MUS-231

The study of basic conducting techniques, including baton technique and score reading for both choral and instrumental music.

PSY-341   Psychology of Adolescent Development3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-201 & junior standing.

This course explores the development of youth from pre-adolescence to late adolescence and emerging adulthood from a historical and cultural view as well as theoretical and practical perspectives. Critical thinking based on current research in this field will be emphasized. The influences of heredity, family, culture, school, and peers will be considered as contexts within which adolescents develop.

ART-342   Modern Art After 19403 credits

The course will cover the history of western art from the rise of New York as a new art-world capital to the more globally dispersed art-world of recent years. Some movements and developments to be considered are: Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Earthworks, Conceptual Art, Feminist Art, Performance Art, Video Art, Installation Art, and developments generally termed "Post-modernism". Some prior art history or upper level humanities or social science course is recommended.

MUS-342   Advanced Conducting2 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-341

The study of advanced conducting techniques for both choral and instrumental ensembles, with an emphasis on score study and expressivity and leadership.

KIN-343   Physiology of Exercise3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-104 or BIO-304 or BIO-374

Corequisites:KIN-343L

A study of the effects of exercise on the structures and functions of the human body with emphasis on the characteristics of muscular contraction, fatigue, mechanism of movement and acquisition of skill. The required laboratory experience will apply the information base from the lecture and will focus on measuring, evaluating and analyzing anthropometric, metabolic and physiologic functions and using the data to describe, predict and change work capacity and performance training protocols.

HIS-343   Religion and the State in Late Imperial China3 credits

This course explores the complex relationship between the Chinese state and Chinese religion during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). Over the course of the semester, we will examine the formation and operation of the state cult; the history of institutionalized traditions such as Buddhism and Daoism; the special problem of so-called "popular" religion; and the emergence of sectarian movements such as the Eight Trigram, Taiping, and Boxer rebellions. No prior coursework on China is required, although prior coursework in history or religion is strongly recommended.(Research Intensive)

POE-343   Politics & Ethics Through Film3 credits

The study of ethical issues and practical politics through movies and documentary films.

KIN-343L   Physiology of Exercise Lab1 credit

Corequisites:KIN-343

The required laboratory experience for KIN-343 will apply the information base from the course lecture and will focus on measuring, evaluating and analyzing anthropometric, metabolic and physiologic functions and using the data to describe, predict and change work capacity and performance training protocols.

HIS-344   Medieval Europe3 credits

A study of the Medieval world focusing on political, religious and economic change from the waning years of the Roman Empire until the end of the 100 Years War in 1453.

ENG-345   Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This is a writing-intensive course, intended primarily for students who have already taken a 200-level writing workshop. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of original poetry and to engage critically and thoughtfully with their own and other writers' poems.

HIS-345   Modern China3 credits

An introduction to the history and cultures of China from the White Lotus Rebellion of 1796 to disintegration of Maoist-style communism in the 1980s. Emphasis will focus on the challenges of Western imperialism and ideas and the response of an ancient social and cultural system to the pressures of modernization. (Research Intensive)

BIO-345   Ecology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-345L

Interrelationships between plants, animals, and their environments. Emphasizes population interactions and community organization. Laboratory emphasizes techniques of ecosystem analysis. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory weekly.

MUS-345   Teaching Band Instruments2 credits

A laboratory class designed for the music education major to play band instruments (woodwinds, brass, and percussion) and learn how to teach these instruments to elementary students at approximately grades 5 or 6.

SPA-345   U.S. Latino/a Literature 3 credits

This course considers key issues in contemporary US Latino/a cultural production by examining diverse literary and cultural texts within the social, historical, and political contexts in which they were created. This course treats a variety of genres from both "high" and "popular" culture: narrative, poetry, theater, film, music, and visual art. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

BIO-345L   Ecology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-345

This is the laboratory course for BIO-345.

ENG-346   Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This is a writing-intensive course, intended primarily for students who have already taken a 200-level writing workshop. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of original literary fiction and to thoughtfully and critically engage with their own and other writers' fiction.

HIS-346   Reformation of the 16th Century3 credits

An examination of the tumultuous changes that rocked Europe between 1517 and 1648, focusing on the interactions between theological, economic, political and personal factors that split the Christian church and changed the Western world.

BIO-346   Field Biology4 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-346.1, BIO-203 or ENV-260 and BIO-202, KPHE-150.19

This course examines the ecology of tropical and subtropical ecosystems (coral reefs, mangroves, tropical rainforests, etc) with an emphasis on the physical, chemical, and biological organization of each system—including the physiological adaptations of organisms. The course will also introduce students to field biology techniques (e.g., field sampling, journaling, etc.). Field study locations include but are not limited to: Australia, Hawaii, and Belize. Students will complete an independent field research project suitable for presentation at a professional meeting. Students are selected based upon a competitive application process as well as completed prerequisite course work.

BIO-346.1   Field Biology Preparation2 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or ENV-260 and BIO-202

This course will cover ecological concepts and field biology techniques in preparation for the Winter off-campus study course, BIO-346 Field Biology, in Australia, Hawaii, etc.

ENG-347   Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This is a writing-intensive course, intended primarily for students who have already taken a 200-level writing workshop. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of original work and to thoughtfully and critically engage with their own and other writers' fiction.

HIS-347   18th Century Europe: The Fall of the Old Regime3 credits

An examination of European history in the years between 1688 and 1815. Special attention is given to politics, ideology and social change in France, the Germanic principalities, and the Netherlands as they evolved the military and governmental structures of the modern nation-state. (Research Intensive)

HIS-348   20th Century Europe: The Trials of Modernity3 credits

An examination of European history in the years between 1914 and 2000. Special attention is given to the successes and failures of European experiments with democracy, the formation of corporatist means of governing, and the postwar movement toward European unity, especially emphasizing developments in France, Germany and Italy.(Research Intensive)

REL-348   Religion and Science3 credits

An examination of the historical, theoretical, and practical relationship between religion and science with an emphasis on contemporary issues and problems in religion and science.

HIS-349   Modern European Intellectual History3 credits

A survey of European intellectual history from the rise of German idealistic philosophy in the early 19th century, through scientific and social scientific developments, to the linguistic turn of the later 20th century.(Research Intensive)

BIO-349   Vertebrate Natural History3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-349L

Vertebrate classification, life histories, adaptations, distribution, and evolution. Three lectures, one four-hour laboratory weekly and occasional field trips.

SOC-349   Social Stratification3 credits

An examination of the processes by which people become differentiated from one another and arranged in graded strata based on social class, race, ethnicity, and gender with varying degrees of wealth, power, and prestige. Attention will be given to classical and modern theories explaining the causes and consequences of stratification, as well as to changes in social inequality over time.

REL-349   Religion and Nature3 credits

An examination of the complex relationship between humans and nature and how it manifests in religious attitudes, values, and practices across the world.

BIO-349L   Vertebrate Natural History Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-203 or both ENV-260 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-349

This is the labaortory for course BIO-349.

KIN-350   Organization and Administration of School Health Programs3 credits

Prerequisites:KIN-201

The organization and administration of health education programs in the elementary and secondary schools to include health objectives, activities, program planning, class management, evaluation, finance, and related issues.

BUS-350   Management Science3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222, BUS-150 and BUS 270 or POE 263

A study of managerial decision making and how analytic frameworks are used to support decisions. Topics include decision modeling, forecasting, linear programming, and statistical quality control. Extensive use of computers.

EDU-350   Literature for Children & Adolescents3 credits

This course includes criteria for selection, an investigation of genres, and reading works by noted authors.

HIS-350   The British Empire 1756-19603 credits

An examination of the rise and fall of the British Empire from the founding of white settlement colonies in the eighteenth century and the rise of tropical imperialism in the nineteenth to the process of de-colonization in the twentieth century. Emphasis will fall on the culture of empire and its corrosive effects. (Research Intensive)

ENV-350   Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)2 credits

Corequisites:ENV-350L

A Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer-based data processing tool used to manage and analyze spatial information. This course introduces students to the theory and techniques of GIS including spatial data acquisition and input, data management, data analysis, and map output. Students will gain hands-on experience with Geographic Information System software (ArcGIS) through laboratory activities. This course is especially useful for students pursuing majors in Environmental Studies, Biology, or Political Economy. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory weekly.

PSY-350   Introduction to Psychological Counseling3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing.

An introduction to current theories, methods, and research in the practice of psychological counseling.

POE-350   Topics in Political Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A study of selected works of ancient, medieval, modern or contemporary political philosophy. Topics will vary from year to year. See courses listed below.

REL-350   Religion and Ethics3 credits

An examination of the various ways that religion and ethics manifest in historical and contemporary contexts.

CSC-350   Formal Languages and Automata3 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-160 and MAT-252. The prerequisite courses must be passed with minimum grades of C.

An introduction to the theoretical foundations of computing, including the theory of formal languages, decidability, recursion, and complexity. Topics may include finite-state automata, regular languages, context-free grammars, decidability and halting, Turing machines, and the complexity hierarchy of algorithms.

POE-350.1   Topics: The Political Philosophy of Nietzsche3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

An examination of the political philosophy of Nietzsche through reading and class discussion. This is a seminar type course where students are expected to lead discussions and develop a personal understanding of the material with limited help from the professor.

POE-350.2   Topics: Feminist Political Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

An examination of relational feminist political philosophy through reading and class discussion. Students will be required to lead class discussions.

POE-350.3   Topics: Readings in Relational Feminist Political Philosophy1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

In this one credit course, we will read and discuss texts dealing with relational feminist political philosophy. Students will be responsible for leading class discussions.

ENV-350L   Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:ENV-350

This is the laboratory course for ENV-350.

ART-351   Auguste Rodin and Modern Sculpture3 credits

This course will survey Rodin's major sculptures such as "The Gates of Hell" and his monuments to important literary figures such as Honori de Balzac and Victor Hugo. It will consider Rodin's importance for later modern sculptors, and his role in re-defining the nature of public sculpture. Art history or upper level humanities or social science course is recommended prior to taking this course.

KIN-351   Instructional Methods in Health3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-102, KIN-201, KIN-244, and MAT-111 or higher. MAT-112 or higher is preferred.

Provides the student with opportunities/experiences to study and apply various methods, materials and equipment for effective health instruction. Focus will be dealing with students school age through adults. Students will be able to gain experience in planning and implementing by utilizing presentations (lectures, lesson and unit plans, discussion, and demonstrations). A practical lab experience will also be included.

REL-351   Philosophy of Religion3 credits

A philosophical consideration of such fundamental ideas as the existence and nature of God, evil, miracles, freedom and immortality with special attention given to religious language and to representative systems of thought.(Cross-listed as PHI-351)

PHI-351   Philosophy of Religion3 credits

(Same as REL-351.) A philosophical consideration of such fundamental ideas as the existence and nature of God, evil, miracles, freedom and immortality with special attention given to religious language and to representative systems of thought.

POE-351   Politics in Developing Countries3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-120

An examination of the common and unique problems facing countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Identifies the strategies used by governments to improve economic conditions and consolidate political processes.

CHE-352   Analytical Chemistry II3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-252 and CHE-252L

Corequisites:CHE-352L

A continued study of the theory and techniques of analytical chemistry including instrumentation theory, separation theory, optical methods and automated analysis. Three hours of lecture weekly.

EDU-352   Diagnosis & Remediation3 credits

A study of the principles and procedures for the diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties.

HIS-352   England to 16883 credits

A study of the development of English political, social, religious and cultural institutions from Stonehenge to the Glorious Revolution of 1688.(Research Intensive)

MAT-352   Differential Equations3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-251 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C.

A study of the solution and applications of ordinary differential equations including systems of equations using matrix algebra.

CHE-352L   Analytical Chemistry II Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-252 and CHE-252L

Corequisites:CHE-352

Required laboratory course for CHE-352. One 3.5-hour laboratory weekly

HIS-353   Modern Britain3 credits

A study of British political, social and cultural institutions since 1688. Particular attention is given to the growth of nationalism, empire, democracy, and the welfare state as the United Kingdom developed into a modern nation.(Research Intensive)

HIS-354   History of Southeast Asia3 credits

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Muslim, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and complexity, and today it boasts some of the world's fastest-growing economies. This course offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history starting from the earliest civilizations, continuing through the colonial conquests, and ending with the various struggles for independence. No prior knowledge of Southeast Asia is required.

BIO-354   Selected Topics: Human Anatomy1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-303 and permission

Corequisites:BIO-354L

A didactic/discussion course consisting of selected dissections on a cadaver and guided supervision of Human Anatomy (BIO-303) students. Limited enrollment.

BIO-354L   Selected Topics: Human Anatomy Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-303

Corequisites:BIO-354

This is the laboratory course for BIO 354.

HIS-355   Women in Modern East Asian History3 credits

The objective of this course is to introduce the histories of modern China and Japan as they were experienced by a handful of women in each of those cultures. Readings for the course will consist largely of autobiographical materials that were written or spoken by Chinese and Japanese women, although secondary sources will also be introduced periodically.

THE-355   Acting Shakespeare3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215

This course focuses on the challenges of bringing the plays of William Shakespeare to life on stage. Students will incorporate various techniques to comprehend and communicate the works of Shakespeare. These include: defining of words, acting approaches derived from the written structure of the verse; study of the First Folio; and vocal/emotional connection to the text.

HIS-357   Popular Culture in Modern Chinese History3 credits

This course examines different aspects of popular culture in modern Chinese history, including food, ritual, architecture, entertainment, social organization, and so forth. No prior knowledge of China is assumed.

BIO-357   Molecular Biology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

A detailed study of the mechanisms of spatial and temporal control of gene expression. Emphasis will be placed on recombinant DNA and bioinformatics techniques. This course will be taught as an integrated lab/lecture workshop.

BUS-357   Organizational Behavior3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100

The application of behavioral science theory and methods to better understand and management individual and group behavior in organizations.

HIS-358   People's Republic of China3 credits

This course will examine the rise of the Chinese Communist Party and the history of the People's Republic of China. Topics will include the communist revolution, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the 1989 democracy movement. No prior knowledge of China is assumed or required. (Research Intensive)

BUS-358   Human Resource Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100

This course examines how the management of human resources can help organizations to successfully deal with today's legal and ethical, social, global, quality, and technological challenges. Emphasis is on developing HR policies and implementing programs regarding the recruitment, selection, training and development, and compensation of employees.

HIS-359   Pre-Modern Japan3 credits

This course will explore the history of Japan from its beginnings to the Tokugawa unification in the seventeenth century. No prior knowledge of Japan is assumed or required.(Research Intensive)

ATH-360   Andean Prehistory and Culture3 credits

An in-depth examination of the pre- Columbian cultures and civilizations of the Andes, focusing on Cusco and the Incan Empire and then working backward to preceding civilizations and forward to what cultural elements have continued into contemporary Andean culture. As part of the immersion experience, students will visit all important Incan archaeological sites, including Machu Piccho, and several pre-Incan sites.

BUS-360   Principles of Marketing3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-270 or POE-263

A foundation course in marketing which addresses the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods, services, and ideas to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational goals with consideration of the social, ethical, economic, and international environments. This foundation course is a prerequisite to all other marketing courses.

BIO-360   Microbiology3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-141 and BIO-202

Corequisites:BIO-360L

This course covers morphology and physiology of microorganisms, with an emphasis on medically-important bacteria and viruses. Methods of identifying and controlling the growth of microorganisms as well as host-microbe interactions will be explored. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

PSY-360   Environmental Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing.

A study of the branch of psychology that deals with the interaction between the physical world and human behavior. Each student will conduct empirical research on some aspect of the relationship between environment and behavior.

SOC-360   Race and Ethnic Relations3 credits

An investigation of ethnic groups, minorities, and race in plural societies, ethnic relations in historical perspective and in the United States, theories about ethnic conflict, prejudice and discrimination, and future scenarios for multiethnic societies.

POE-360   Comparative Politics3 credits

A comparative study of governments and political activity. Industrial democracies, transitional democracies, and various forms of authoritarian rule are examined. Case studies are drawn from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.

HIS-360   Orientalism and the Making of the Modern World3 credits

The contemporary world of independent nation states variously categorized into "developed" and "developing," "first world" and "third world," "western" and "non-western," is a critical artifact of the recent age of empires. Drawing on Edward Said's theories about the construction of colonial knowledge, as well as the patterns, economics, and social formations of European and Asian empires, this course will examine the modern world in relation to the recent imperial past and subsequent developments in the post-colonial era.

BIO-360L   Microbiology Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-360

This is the lab section for BIO-360.

MAT-361   Linear Algebra3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

A study of general vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

BIO-361   Pathobiology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-304

Concepts of pathobiology, to include causes, physiological mechanisms, symptoms, and patterns of pathogenesis of human disease.

HIS-363   The Rise of Christianity: Classical History and Archaeology3 credits

An analysis of the origins of Christianity within the Roman Empire. Special attention will be given to theological development and church-state relations between the second and fourth centuries.

POE-364   State & Local Politics3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

The study of sub-national governmental units with a special emphasis on Idaho politics.

HIS-364   The Life of Jesus: History and Archaeology3 credits

An analysis of the Gospels of the New Testament in their historical, archaeological, literary and cultural context. (Research Intensive)

BIO-365   Immunology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

Study of immune responses at molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Application of this knowledge to study autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency, and manipulation of the immune system in the treatment of human diseases. Three lectures weekly.

BIO-365L   Immunology Laboratory1 credit

Corequisites:BIO-365

This lab may or may not be scheduled along with the BIO-365 lecture. When the laboratory is scheduled with the lecture, it is a required co-requisite course.

BUS-366   Marketing Communication3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-360

An analysis of the field of advertising, sales promotion, public relations, and personal selling management from an integrated marketing communications perspective. The course will focus on an examination of the marketing process, consumer behavior, communications theory, and the role of research to effectively plan, implement, and evaluate advertising and promotional programs.

IND-368   The Prison Experience5 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

An opportunity to learn firsthand about prisons and prison life as students read prison-related texts in sociology and literature and as they write in response to what they read and what they see at local correctional institutions. Authors may include Michael Santos, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Michel Foucault, and Assata Shakur as well as a number of social science texts.

HIS-368   Jewish History3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will serve as an introduction to the history of the Jewish people from the First Revolt against Rome in 66 A.D. until the reestablishment of the State of Israel. Students will also study the theological, literary and legal texts of the Diaspora (the Jews in Exile, 132 to 1948).

MAT-370   Geometry3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

A study of Euclidean geometry and the development of non-Euclidean geometry, one of the most significant occurrences in the history of mathematics.

PSY-370   Health Psychology & Behavioral Medicine3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-101 & junior standing.

This course examines the relationships between individual behavior and health. Attention is given to theory as well as clinical and laboratory research. Topics of investigation include sleep, diet, stress patterns, exercise, smoking and other lifestyle variables. Therapeutic strategies will be critically reviewed.

POE-370    Political Economy of China3 credits

A study of political and economic change in the People's Republic of China since 1949. The themes of revolution, reform, growth and stability are explored through an examination of changing state policies and their political, economic, and social effects.

BIO-371   Endocrinology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

Study of hormones and the mechanisms by which hormones regulate genetic and cellular function, and metabolism.

POE-371   Political Economy of Japan3 credits

An examination of the world's first Asian industrial superpower. Explores the political economic roots of Japan's political economy with consideration of cultural influences, economic nationalism, democratization, and foreign relations.

MAT-372   History of Mathematics3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

A historical survey of the ideas, tools, and symbols of mathematics and the people who developed them. For upper-division students who are planning to teach or otherwise pursue mathematics as a profession.

BIO-372   Developmental Biology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-372L

Study of the main principles of animal developmental biology on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Three lecture/discussions and one three-hour lab weekly.

BIO-372L   Developmental Biology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-372

This is the lab section for BIO-372.

BIO-374   Animal Physiology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-374L

Comparative study of temperature, respiration, circulation, energy metabolism, homeostasis, and neuromuscular function. Three lectures/discussion and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

POE-374   Political Economy of Southeast Asia3 credits

This course examines political and economic development in one of the world's most diverse and economically dynamic regions. Students explore how the region has transitioned from a Cold War battlefield to a post-Cold War marketplace. Topics range from the Vietnam War, the Cambodian genocide, and military rule in Myanmar (Burma) to rapid economic growth in Thailand, Indonesia, and Singapore. Major themes cover economic development, globalization, agrarian change, democratization and human rights.

BIO-374L   Animal Physiology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-374

This is the lab section for BIO-374.

BIO-375   Plant Physiology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-375L

Nutrition, gas exchange, water relations, transport, metabolism, growth, and development of plants with emphasis on environmental influences. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

BIO-375L   Plant Physiology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-375

Thhis is the lab section for BIO-375.

POE-376   International Economics3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-263

A review of the principles of international trade, the institutions that govern trade, the economic and political aspects of economic integration, and the impact of trade on the development of nations.

BIO-376   Neurophysiology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-330

This course serves as an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Topics include neurodevelopment, gross organization of the brain and spinal cord, biophysical properties of excitable cells, synaptic transmission, the processing of sensory information, motor control, and higher cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Laboratory studies include comparative neuroanatomy, the molecular and cellular basis of behavior in invertebrates, and neurophysiology.

BIO-376L   Neurophysiology Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-330L

This is the laboratory course for Neurophysiology.

HIS-377   Women in the Americas3 credits

A comparative history of women's experiences with emphasis on expressions of feminist consciousness and the evolution of gender ideologies in Latin America and the United States from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Topics will include struggles for political and economic rights, sexuality, constructions of femininity and masculinity, marriage, and reproduction.

POE-377   Government & Business3 credits

An analysis of the distinction between public and private economic issues. A detailed discussion of the appropriateness of governmental intervention in the economy. Emphasis will be placed on discussion of readings and group assignments.

BIO-377   Physiology of Extremes3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-377L

An in depth coverage of how organisms survive under extreme environmental conditions. Topics will include physiological adaptations to life in environments with extreme temperatures, oxygen concentrations, salinities, and limited water availability, such as deserts, high altitudes, and arctic or alpine tundra. Three lectures/discussions and one three-hour laboratory weekly.

BIO-377L   Physiology of Extremes Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-202 and BIO-330

Corequisites:BIO-377

This is the laboratory course for BIO-377.

HIS-378   Liberation Theology3 credits

An examination of the Liberation Theology Movement from the 1960s to the present in Latin America. The course will examine the historical context of the movement and consider its impact on the Americas.

HIS-380   Colonial Latin America3 credits

A study of Latin America from the conquistadors to independence movements. The course will examine social and ethnic groups, cultural practices, and institutions of colonial Latin America.

POE-380   International Political Economy3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

An exploration of how politics and economics intersect in the global arena. Considers key institutions and the role of state and transnational actors in facilitating and undermining economic and political development. Examines the rise of globalization including its empirical and moral dimensions.

BUS-381   Electronic Commerce: Business Uses of the Internet3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-100 and BUS-150

Students with Junior or Senior standing will have better background for this course. Familiarity with the use of the internet is assumed. Business opportunities, challenges, and strategies for use of the information superhighway will be explored, as will strategies and vision on how to leverage the emerging national and global information infrastructure. Includes review of the tools and technologies necessary for electronic commerce and the impact of the emerging electronic market and commerce re-engineering in today's corporations.

HIS-381   Military and Society in Latin America3 credits

An examination of the military since the colonial period with emphasis on the twentieth-century. The course will investigate international and domestic concerns including the impact of the Cold War and the confrontation of military governments confrontations with various sectors of society, including peasants, labor, and women.

HIS-382   Modern Mexico3 credits

A study of Mexico from the war of independence to the present. Special attention is given to political and social struggles over land, resources, and identity, Mexico's relationship with the United States, the revolutionary period, and the institutionalization of the Revolution.(Research Intensive)

HIS-384   Modern Japan3 credits

This course studies modern Japan since the Tokugawa period. It will focus primarily on social, political, economic, and diplomatic events. Special attention will be given to Japan's cultural foundation, the Meiji reform, economic development, the rise of militarism and nationalism, World War II, the American Occupation, and postwar growth.(Research Intensive)

BUS-385.1   Management Information Systems3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-150 and Junior or Senior standing

A course that surveys the use of computer-based information systems in business. Uses a socio-technical approach to examine the organization, management, infrastructure and support for information technology in businesses preparing to become digital entities. Introduces topics covered in more depth in BUS 381, 482, 483, and 485.

HIS-386   Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica3 credits

Focusing on the cultural region that includes parts of present day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador, this course will examine major sedentary societies and empires of Mesoamerica. Through an examination of anthropological, archeological, and historical sources, the course will explore the growth, expansion, decline, and cultural legacies of the Olmec, Mayan, Zapotec, Teotihuacan, and Aztec civilizations.

HIS-387   Modern Cuba3 credits

A study of Cuba from the colonial period to the present. Topics will include Cuba's emergence as the most important sugar economies of the nineteenth century, the slave-led revolutionary emancipation movements, Cuban nationalism and ideology as expressed by Jose Marti confrontations with the U.S., and the 1959 Revolution and its aftermath.(Research Intensive)

HIS-388   Comparative Slavery in the Americas3 credits

A historiographical examination of slavery in the Americas from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century in the greater Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States. Topics will include economic structures of slavery, race and ideology, African diasporic communities, slave resistance, and emancipation.

HIS-389   Latin American-U.S. Relations3 credits

An examination of the political and economic relationship between Latin America and the United States from the 1820s to the present. Particular attention will be paid to representations of Latin America in the U.S., popular and political ideologies that shaped U.S. policies, as well as Latin American nationalistic and revolutionary responses.(Research Intensive)

POE-389   Ecological Economics3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing

A discussion-based course covering topics in renewable and nonrenewable resource use, sustainable yields in fisheries, transportation issues, management of endangered species, and land-use management (e.g., urban sprawl). Primary focus will be on issues of regional significance (e.g., conservation of Pacific salmon stocks, water-use management). Economic concepts covered include market failure, cost-benefit analysis, monetary evaluation of the environment, and sustainable economic development.

MUS-390   Junior Recital1 - 2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Typically performed at the end of the junior year, this is a substantive recital prepared by students for a public audience, demonstrating their accumulated skills and ability to musically communicate at a high artistic level.

THE-390   Creative Drama3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215

An introduction to the principles and practice of a game-based, improvisational approach to theatre. Focus on improvisational games and open scenes to explore acting/storytelling without scripted materials as well as examination of other problems in performance.

MS-390   Military Science Practicum6 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A field based course which provides students with the opportunity to apply the leadership skills they have learned. Course is completed at the five-week ROTC Advanced Leadership Camp at Fort Lewis, Washington. NOTE: This is required of all contracted students and is usually completed during the summer between the junior and senior years.

BUS-391   Legal Environment3 credits

Prerequisites:FYS-101 and BUS-100 and BUS 270 or POE-263 and Junior or Senior standing

An introduction to the fundamental principles of law affecting business. Topics will include contract law, UCC, property rights, partnerships and corporations, rights of creditors, business regulation, rights of shareholders, and other legal concerns of both profit and non-profit organizations. This is a writing intensive course and writing skills are part of the grading process.

CHE-394   Special Topics in Chemistry2 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-302 and CHE-302L

A course for students pursuing a major or minor in chemistry. Specialized subjects in inorganic, analytical, organic, physical, environmental or biochemistry will be examined in a lecture and seminar format. Topics involving current literature and research will be emphasized. Four hours of lecture weekly.

CHE-395   Chemistry Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory research project culminating in a paper or poster written in accordance with departmental guidelines. The work will make an original contribution to the science of chemistry.

BIO-395   Research Methods & Techniques2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory course in selected areas such as cell biology and toxicology or molecular biology or bioinformatics. Working in a research group students critically evaluate scientific literature and solve problems using laboratory techniques typical of the selected area of study. Students enrolled in this course will be actively engaged in laboratory research and will be expected to conduct research projects outside of the scheduled class time period.

BIO-396   Biology Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory or field research problem culminating in a paper or other final presentation according to departmental guidelines. See specific guidelines in the student handbook for written and/or oral presentations. Students enrolled in BIO-396 must complete relevant safety training prior to beginning laboratory or field work. In addition, students must complete a course in research ethics such as Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) or equivalent by mid-term.

CHE-397   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Internships are designed to give students experience in their fields of interest. A written summary of the internship and weekly consultation with the instructor may be required. See internship guidelines.

BIO-397   Internship1 - 6 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing and Instructor permission

Internships are designed to give students experience in the fields of their interest, and are coordinated through the Center for Experiential Learning (CEL). A written summary of the internship and a seminar are presented to the department at the conclusion of the internship. See CEL internship guidelines. See internship guidelines.

PSY-397   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Supervised work and study or research in an institution or with an organization providing for the application of psychological theories and principles to current problems. Students majoring in other fields are eligible for consideration. Students are required to observe the guidelines of the American Psychological Association. See internship guidelines.

HSC-397   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing and instructor permission.

Internships are designed to give students experience in their fields of interest. A written summary of the internship and an oral presentation are required at the conclusion of the internship. See internship guidelines.

EDU-398   Practicum in ESL / Bilingual Education1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This practicum extends pre-service teachers' cultural sensitivity, theoretical knowledge of second language acquisition, and skills in ESL and bilingual methods through a professional experience with culturally/linguistically diverse students in a local school setting. The course is a collaborative venture among the college student, a bilingual or ESL teacher, and a college instructor. For each credit earned, participants spend 25 hours with elementary, middle school, or high school student(s) in local schools in addition to 20 hours involved in academic reading, writing, and seminar discussions. This field experience fulfills a requirement for the ESL and Bilingual Education endorsements for teacher certification in the state of Idaho. Students must complete an application packet prior to placement in a school. (Cross-listed as MFL-398)

BIO-398   Readings & Conference1 - 2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Independent reading and weekly conference with a faculty supervisor. Appropriate for fields of special interest, but will not substitute for required courses.

MFL-398   Practicum in FL/ESL/Bilingual Education3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This practicum extends pre-service teachers' cultural sensitivity, theoretical knowledge of second language acquisition, and skills in ESL and Bilingual methods through a professional experience with culturally/linguistically diverse students in a local school setting. The course is a collaborative venture among the college student, a bilingual or ESL teacher, and a college instructor. For each credit earned, participants spend 25 hours with elementary, middle school, or high school student(s) in local schools in addition to 20 hours involved in academic reading, writing, and seminar discussions. This field experience fulfills a requirement for the ESL and Bilingual Education endorsements for teacher certification in the state of Idaho. Students must complete an application packet prior to placement in a school. (Cross-listed as EDU-398)

THE-398   Theatre Minor Capstone Writing Project1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

As a final project for theatre minors, students write a detailed review of a professional theatre production (approved by theatre department) that will analyze and critique all facets of production and performance as well as a paper reflecting how the theatre minor complemented a student's major or vocational skill.

HSC-398   Readings & Conference1 - 2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Independent reading and weekly conference with a faculty supervisor. Appropriate for fields of special interest, but will not substitute for required courses.

PSY-398.1   Practicum in Teaching Psychology1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Training in assisting psychology instruction. Includes regular meetings with professor and working with small groups of students in psychology courses. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Pass/Fail.

MFL-399   Advanced Readings in Modern Foreign Languages1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Independent readings and weekly conferences with a faculty supervisor. Appropriate for authors/ topics/literatures of special interest. May be repeated for credit.

REL-399   Readings in Religion1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Directed readings in religion on a topic selected by the student, to be evaluated by quizzes, examinations, journal and/or papers, as agreed upon with the instructor.

PHI-399   Readings in Philosophy3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Prereq.: Permission. Directed readings in philosophy on a topic selected by the student, to be evaluated by quizzes, examinations, journal and/or papers, as agreed upon with the instructor.

SPE-399   Debate II1 credit

Prerequisites:SPE-199

It is designed for students who wish to participate in intercollegiate debate and speech competitions. It will have lectures, discussion sessions and debates. Only three units of credit from SPE-199/399 will count toward the Speech Rhetoric Minor. May be repeated. Pass/Fail.

POE-399   Model United Nations II1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course is designed to facilitate student participation in National Model United Nations (NMUN) conference each spring. The NMUN is held in New York City and part of the conference takes place at the United Nations itself. Students will prepare to represent The College of Idaho at the conference. Course content will be based on the country assignment for the NMUN conference. May be repeated for credit. Only three credits of POE 199 (Model United Nations I) and POE-399 will count toward a major in the POE department.

HIS-399T   Special Topics in History1 - 3 credits

Topics not offered in the regular curriculum. See courses listed below.

POE-399T   Special Topics in Political Economy3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-263

Study of selected areas of politics and economics not available in the regular curriculum. See courses listed below.

JOURN-399T   Special Topics in Interactive Journalism1 credit

Topics vary.

PHY-399T   Special Topics in Physics1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Study of selected areas of physics not available in the regular curriculum.

PSY-399T   Special Topics in Psychology1 - 3 credits

These courses are offered covering specific topics that are not a part of the regular curriculum. See courses listed below.

POE-399T.03   Domestic Political Economy3 credits

Prerequisites:POE-263

The political economy aspects of selected domestic issues will be analyzed. These issues will include (but not be limited to) the federal budget deficit, health care, immigration, minimum wage, social security, subsidies to private firms, environmental protection, and technological development.

ENV-399T.1   Slow Food in Italy1 credit

Prerequisites:ENV-200

This course, to be offered for 10 to 12 days over an extended spring break in 2013, will take students to Italy for in-depth, hands-on study of the Slow Food Movement. The trip will entail visits to universities, farmer's fields, and agricultural centers. There is an application process for admission to the course. The class will meet several times before the study trip itself, and students will have assigned reading and writing assignments in conjunction with the course.

HIS-399T.2   Tudor England3 credits

This course will explore the various political, religious, and cultural changes which England experienced under the reign of the Tudor monarchs. Emphases will include domestic and international political conflicts, England's involvement in the European Reformation, and the rising importance of theater in English society during the sixteenth century.

PSY-399T.2   Motivation & Belief3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-201 or 206 & junior standing.

Students will investigate the research literature related to motivation, cognition and behavioral choice. They will also examine literature regarding true believers, cults, serial killers, and persuasion literature.

SPA-399T.2   Latin America Today3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-330

The focus of this course is the study of specific aspects of contemporary Latin American culture, including history, art, literature, music, politics and social issues.

PSY-399T.4   Film Noir: The Shadow and Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-254

The difficult concepts of Jungian Shadow and Lacanian Mirror will be investigated through the medium of the detective film noir. Effects of these two concepts will be examined with the goal of understanding how they have affected the narrative history (theory) of cinema and psychology. Reading and discussion will be combined with viewing the film.

SPA-399T.4   Human Rights for the First Generation3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-330

This course focuses on the evolving awareness of human rights as an ethical issue in the United States with particular emphasis on the perspectives of first generation immigrants. Topics for exploration include peace, justice, freedom, equality, security, dignity, tolerance, and a healthy environment. Lecture, readings, and coursework in Spanish.

HIS-399T.5   Modern Tibet3 credits

The primary objective of this course is to provide an introduction to modern Tibetan history. While much of our attention will be focused on the political history of Tibet during the twentieth century, we will also spend a considerable amount of time examining the social and cultural dimensions of traditional Tibetan life. Over the course of the term, we will cover topics such as nomadic society, Tibetan religion, Tibetan empire, the rule of Dalai Lamas, the Chinese administration of Tibet, and the Tibetan independence movement.

HIS-399T.6   Mexico: The City as Place and History2 credits

This two-credit class is a prerequisite for the four-credit summer off-campus course, HIS-399T.7 of the same name. It consists of classroom coursework intended to provide students with a deeper understanding of the history and culture of Mexico, with focus on urban history. Six credits of HIS-3xx may be applied to the following majors and minors: the History major and minor and / or the Latin American Studies minor.

HIS-399T.7   Mexico: The City as Place and History4 credits

This course considers the questions of contested place, cultural contacts, and conflicts, as well as contemporary challenges posed by tourism and migration in select pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern cities of Mexico. From mid-May to mid-June, students will visit Mexico City, Teotihuacan, Oaxaca City, Monte Alban, and either San Cristobal de las Casas and Paenque or Merida and select Mayan cities in the Yucatan Peninsula. Application to the program is comptetitive. History majors and LAS minors will be given priority.

EDU-400   Philosophy of Education2 credits

An introduction to the philosophy of education through the study of selected problems and figures who have influenced schooling. Students will develop their own philosophy of education.

PHY-400   Quantum Physics2 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:PHY-272 and MAT-251

Approximately three-fifths of the course covers an introduction to modern quantum physics including the development of matrix methods, the Schroedinger equation, and elementary applications. The last part of the course examines applications of quantum mechanics to atomic, molecular, and solid state systems. Students may enroll for the first three-fifths of the course and earn 2 units of credit or for the full course and earn 3 units of credit.

MUS-400   Musicology Seminar3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-311

This course engages students in intensive reading, listening, and analyzing regarding a specific musicological topic. Through original research and writing students develop tools for understanding and articulating music-related topics. Topics range from historical to more modern popular subjects.

ART-400   Senior Exhibition3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Each student develops a conceptually and formally unified body of work that will be displayed in the Rosenthal Gallery of Art. All students are responsible for publicizing, organizing and hanging the exhibition.

CHE-401   Chemical Dynamics2 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-152, CHE-302, and CHE-302L

Corequisites:CHE-401L

A study of molecules in motion, the rates of chemical reactions, and molecular reaction dynamics. Six hours of lecture and three 3.5 hour laboratories weekly.

JOURN-401   Senior Project3 credits

Prerequisites:JOURN-300 and JOURN-301

The Senior Project is the culmination of the minor. Students create collaborative projects that emulate the form and method of traditional journalistic work. Each project will include photography, graphics, text, and possibly video and audio. The projects are intended to explore local issues and will enable students to do original work - researching, interviewing, reporting, editing, designing and illustrating - for publication. In this way the seniors in the minor will experience the dynamic of working with a small group on deadline and have the opportunity to create a full-length publication. Some of the types of products that are proposed are online magazines with short and long features, photo galleries, video and audio interviews, multi-sectioned feature stories, and mini-documentaries in sound and/or video. Students will blog/vlog (video blog) their projects throughout the term. The class time will be devoted to workshopping the projects and discussing the course texts.

HIS-401   Seminar in Historical Methods3 credits

Prerequisites:HIS-280, senior standing, permission and completion of two "Research Intensive" courses from two different regional distribution areas

A capstone for the history major focusing on advanced research and historiography. Primary emphasis will lie on preparing an advanced primary-source based research project.

MS-401-402   Professional Preparation each3 credits

Prerequisites:MS-301 and MS-302

An investigation of ethics and human relations, counseling techniques, military service in today's society, obligations and responsibilities of an officer on active duty, and coordination and operation of the military team. Students evaluate leadership potential of lower classmen and are responsible for planning and executing laboratory training. Prepares the prospective Army officer for initial Army Assignment.

CHE-401L   Chemical Dynamics Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:MAT-152, CHE-302, and CHE-302L

Corequisites:CHE-401

Required laboratory course for CHE-401. Three 3.5-hour laboratories weekly

ENV-402   Senior Capstone3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

An integration and synthesis of different disciplinary perspectives as they relate to a specific local or regional environmental issue. Students will bring to the seminar their expertise from their disciplinary foci, pursue independent research, and collaborate on a formal written project.

ATH-404   Theories in Anthropology3 credits

An examination of the development of theories of culture from classical models through 20th century American, British, and French anthropological thought to recent cultural interpretations that are emerging in our own time.

PSY-404   Abnormal Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-206 & junior standing.

A critical study of the origin and development of atypical and maladaptive modes of behavior with emphasis on theory, treatment and research.

PSY-405   Seminar: Contemporary Issues3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-312

A senior-level investigation of contemporary issues in psychology with a strong emphasis on individual use of the literature. Topics vary.

THE-407   Advanced Directing3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-315

A more in-depth examination of the art of stage direction using advanced methods, live performance study, advanced theory and culminating in each student directing a one-act play for public performance.

PSY-407   Introduction to Forensic Psychology3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior standing.

This course is a senior level course on the issues related to psychology and forensics. Topics to be covered will include: DSM characteristics of offenders, definitions of insanity and the insanity defense, conviction and incarcerating of the mentally ill, psychological issues of criminality, issues of evidence, jury selection issues, stress and law enforcement, and profiling. Students will be expected to read and understand advanced texts including primary source materials. The course will be seminar format.

KIN-408   Adult Fitness Programming3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-303 and KIN-343.

A course designed to help students gain experience in fitness assessment, exercise prescription and fitness programming. Students will work hands on with clients, who may include staff and faculty from various departments on campus, who are interested in starting and maintaining an active lifestyle. Students will provide the client a self-directed exercise program that includes cardiorespiratory, strength training and flexibility activities. This course is recommended for all students who wish to pursue a career in adult fitness programming, community and corporate wellness and cardiac rehabilitation.

KIN-410   Exercise Metabolism3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-201, BIO-202, CHE-142, KIN-343, and MAT-111 or higher. MAT-112 or MAT-212 is preferred.

The aim of this course is for students to learn the underlying cellular and metabolic mechanisms and to understand how these mechanisms apply to exercise, health, and disease. The main mechanisms and concepts to be addressed relate to 1) cellular physiology, 2) bioenergetics, 3) carbohydrates, fats, and protein biological roles, 4) fluid balance, and 5) reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. Particular emphasis is placed on the logic controlling metabolism and understanding the relationship of metabolism to performance, health, and disease or disease risk. Students will contribute to both the teaching of the course and choosing of the content relating to the course. Metabolic and nutritional aspects of exercise will be examined from the following perspective: acute effects of exercise, adaptations to exercise, health impact of both sedentary and active lifestyles, and impact of nutrition availability.

MUS-410   Composition Seminar and Orchestration for Voice1 credit

The course is designed to give student the tools and skills which are vital to understanding how to write and arrange for the human voice. This course uses the works of successful composers as models for composition training, combining theoretical and practical studies of vocal orchestration with technology resources and live performances.

KIN-411   Cardiopulmonary Physiology3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-201, BIO-202, CHE-142, KIN-343, and MAT-111 or higher. MAT-112 or MAT-212 is preferred.

This course emphasizes basic normal physiological mechanisms during rest and with reference to physical work and exercise. The focus of the course is on the mechanisms that affect the heart, systemic circulation, kidney, acid base, thermoregulation, blood vessles, internal and external respiration and the biochemistry of the cardiopulmonary system. In addition, we will discuss the mechanisms involved in physiological adaptations during stress and exertion in apparently healthy populations. Real life cases will be used to provide plausible and reasonable explanations and solutions.

MUS-411   Composition Seminar & Orchestration for Strings1 credit

Prerequisites:MUS-104

The course is designed to give student the tools and skills which are vital to understanding how to write and arrange for stringed instruments. This course uses the works of successful composers as models for composition training, combining theoretical and practical studies of string orchestration with technology resources and live performances.

CHE-412   Biochemistry3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-201, BIO-201L, CHE-301, and CHE-301L

A course in biochemical principles. Topics include thermodynamics, biomolecules, enzyme mechanisms, metabolic pathways, and regulation. Three hours of lecture weekly.

MUS-412   Composition Seminar and Orchestration for Woodwinds1 credit

The course is designed to give student the tools and skills which are vital to understanding how to write and arrange for woodwind instruments. This course uses the works of successful composers as models for composition training, combining theoretical and practical studies of woodwind orchestration with technology resources and live performances.

CHE-412L   Biochemistry Lab1 credit

Prerequisites:BIO-201, BIO-120L, CHE-301, and CHE-301L

Corequisites:CHE-412

An elective laboratory course for CHE-412. One 3.5-hour laboratory weekly.

MUS-413   Composition Seminar & Orchestration for Brass & Percussion1 credit

Prerequisites:MUS-104

The course is designed to give student the tools and skills which are vital to understanding how to write and arrange for brass and percussion instruments. This course uses the works of successful composers as models for composition training, combining theoretical and practical studies of brass and percussion orchestration with technology resources and live performances.

THE-415   Advanced Acting and Scene Study3 credits

Prerequisites:THE-215

This course is designed for the advanced Theatre student to thoroughly explore character and scene study through the works of contemporary playwrights. Students will discuss, analyze, and act in scenes from challenging modern works.

ART-415   Professional Practices in Visual Arts2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will cover professional practices in the visual arts. Topics will include display, matting, framing, documenting artwork and the creation of a portfolio. It may include guest lectures and visits to local studios, museums and galleries.

CHE-420   Inorganic Chemistry3 credits

Prerequisites:CHE-302 and CHE-302L

Corequisites:CHE-420L

A select coverage of topical inorganic chemistry comprising molecular symmetry, polyatomic bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallics, and catalysis. Three hours of lecture weekly. One 3.5 hour laboratory weekly.

MUS-420   Digital Audio Recording, Editing & Production1 credit

Prerequisites:MUS-104

A study of sound, hearing, and the aesthetics of audio recording. An overview of recording processes and technologies including microphones, signal processing, hard drive recording, audio mixers, post production editing using SoundForge, Audacity and ProTools, and various means of archiving and using digital audio online. The recording practice is limited to two-track stereo recording techniques. Students will gain practical experience by recording ensemble and solo performances within the music department.

CHE-420L   Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory1 credit

Prerequisites:CHE-302 and CHE-302L

Corequisites:CHE-420

Required laboratory course for CHE-420. This laboratory is a study encompassing reactions and synthesis of inorganic or organometallic compounds. Various instrumental techniques will be investigated for the isolation and characterization of inorganic products. One 3.5 hour laboratory weekly.

ACC-423   Auditing.3 credits

Prerequisites: ACC-320

A study of the principles governing the independent review of financial statements, professional standards, ethics, evaluation of internal control, auditing procedures and preparation of working papers.

KIN-424   Stress Testing and ECG Interpretaion3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-304, CHE-142, and KIN-343.

This course is designed to fill the needs of students who desire to interpret resting and exercise, normal and abnormal ECG, as well as provide an overview of heart anatomy, function and neurophysiology. A key course for any student who has an interest or desire to pursue the American College of Sports Medicine certification as exercise specialist or registered clinical exercise physiologist.

ACC-424   Tax Accounting I3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222

A study of income, excise, and social security taxation emphasizing individual and small enterprise tax problems. Selected fields of small enterprise activity are explored to provide specific emphasis.

PSY-424   Motivation & Emotion3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-206 & junior standing.

The study of theories of motivation and emotion with emphasis on their use in understanding human behavior. The course is conducted as a seminar with reading in original source materials and an active research component.

ACC-425   Tax Accounting II3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-424

A study of income, excise, and social security taxation emphasizing individual and small enterprise tax problems. Selected fields of small enterprise activity are explored to provide specific emphasis.

ACC-426   Fund Accounting.3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222

A study of the special nature of accounting for governmental, institutional, and non-profit economic entities. The course will cover budgeting, fund characteristics, cost accounting systems, and analysis.

ACC-427   Cost Accounting.3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222

A study of the role of accounting information in decision making emphasizing the use of accounting data for internal management decisions. The course includes an introduction to cash flows, cost accounting, cost-volume-profit relationships, and budgeting in business decisions and the theory, terminology, accumulation, reporting and evaluation of costs, including job order process and standard cost break-even analysis and budgeting techniques.

BUS-430   Advanced Financial Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-330

Contemporary issues in finance. Topics can include liquidity management, asset valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure, and financial strategy.

EDU-430   Teaching in a Diverse Society3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-202, PSY-221, and full or provisional admission to the teacher education program.

This course surveys the issues of educating a diverse population in a pluralistic society. Topics of study include the culture of poverty, race and ethnicity, gender, religion, linguistic minority education models, and sheltered instruction. This course includes 20 hours field experience in a K-12 classroom. Students in this class will document proficiency for Principle 3 of the Idaho Core Teacher Standards: Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs. The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to students with diverse needs.

PSY-430   Learning & Behavior3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-203 & junior standing.

The study and application of principles of learning that have emerged from an experimental analysis of human and animal behavior. Some of these principles are operant conditioning, reinforcement, discrimination, generalization, and extinction. Each student will demonstrate the application of one or more principles in the modification of behavior.

MUSAP-430   Applied Music0.5 - 1 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Personalized private lessons on an instrument or in voice. Requires a minimum of three hours of practice weekly in addition to 30 minutes of instruction for each unit of credit. More practice may be required at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Extra fee

MAT-431   Complex Variables3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

A study of the calculus of functions of a complex variable. Topics include elementary functions, series representation, analytic functions, complex integration and conformal mappings.

BUS-432   Investment Theory and Practice3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-330 or instructor permission

A study of the nature of investment, classification and analysis of bonds, stocks, etc., risk and return analysis, the Efficient Markets Hypothesis, CAPM, Modern Portfolio Theory, and the selection and management of financial portfolios.

KIN-434   Adapted Physical Education3 credits

A study of prevalent disabilities with implications for program development, organization, administration and evaluation of adapted physical education at the elementary and secondary school levels.

SPA-437   Spanish Literature & Society: Narrative & Film3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-333 or SPA-334

A study of literary and cinematic narrative through representative works. Their relationships to Spanish and Spanish-American society and history will be emphasized.

BUS-438   Financial Problems3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-330

Research and reports on selected problems or topics in finance.

SPA-438   Spanish Literature & Society: Poetry, Drama and Song3 credits

Prerequisites:SPA-333 or SPA-334

A study of verse and drama through representative historical and contemporary works from Spain and Spanish America.

CSC-440   Introduction to Operating Systems3 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-160 and CSC-340. The prerequisite courses must be passed with minimum grades of C.

Operating system design and implementation. This course investigates the theory and application of resource management in modern operating systems through a hands-on approach. Topics may include: file systems, memory management, process management, interprocess communication, resource sharing, I/O, networking, and distributed computing models.

EDU-441   Curriculum & Instruction3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-202, PSY-221, and full or provisional admission to the teacher education program.

An overview of school curriculum design and instructional strategies for K-12 teachers. Emphasis is placed upon the process of curricula design for K-12 classrooms; identification of the basic principles of teaching and learning and their application for effective instruction; application of those principles in K-12 classrooms; micro teaching using various instructional strategies. A minimum of 20 hours in a K-12 classroom is required.

MAT-441   Topology3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

An introduction to the techniques and theorems of point-set topology and metric spaces. Topics include: cardinality, separation axioms, compactness, connectedness, continuity and finite products.

EDU-442   Teaching Exceptional Children3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-202, PSY-221 and full or provisional admission to the teacher education program.

This is a survey of learning disabilities and learning styles. Emphasis is placed on the methods demonstrated to be most effective in mainstreamed classrooms. Laws dealing with special education and Section 504 accommodations will be reviewed.

MUS-442   Music Methods and Materials3 credits

Prerequisites:MUS-341

This course, for music education majors, will include methods and materials of teaching music in the public schools for grades K-12 in elementary general music, secondary vocal music, and secondary instrumental (band and orchestra) music. This course is designed to prepare students for their internship and certification to teach music in public schools. Some of the topics will include philosophy of music education, history of music education, special teaching methods (Kodaly, Orff, Suzuki), national organizations (MENC) and seminars (Tanglewood), instructional planning, research in music education, technology, facilities and ethics.

MUS-443   String Pedagogy and Practicum1 credit

Prerequisites:MUS-342

Corequisites:MUS-121

This class will specialize in methods and materials unique to teaching strings in a group setting. It will include the opportunity to receive coaching and mentoring while conducting a string orchestra (The College of Idaho Sinfonia) in rehearsal and concert scenarios.

BUS-444   International Finance3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-330

Provides a framework for understanding financial management issues from a global perspective. Includes an introduction to the international financial system, the balance of payments, exchange rate determination, the management of multi-national corporations, and hedging currency and capital risks.

EDU-444   Second Language Acquisition Theory & Practice3 credits

An analysis of second language acquisition theory and practice. The course includes review of textbooks, preparation of units of instruction, microteaching of lessons and class visitations. (Cross-listed as MFL-444)

MFL-444   Second Language Acquisition Theory & Practice3 credits

An analysis of second language acquisition theory and practice. The course includes review of textbooks, preparation of units of instruction, microteaching of lessons and class visitations. (Cross-listed as EDU-444)

MUS-444   Choral Pedagogy and Practicum1 credit

Prerequisites:MUS-342

Corequisites:MUS-126

This class will specialize in methods and materials unique to teaching choir. It will include the opportunity to receive coaching and mentoring while conducting a choir (The College of Idaho Chorale) in rehearsal and concert scenarios.

MFL-445   Foreign Language, ESL, & Bilingual Methods3 credits

Prerequisites:MFL-444

The course reinforces and extends students' knowledge of second language acquisition theory and practice in the context of standards-based language education. Course content also includes cross-cultural awareness and discussion of sociological issues pertaining to minority student education. Students will utilize ESL, Bilingual, and foreign language methods in lesson planning and microteaching, visit language classes, and create a theme-based unit that incorporates the multiple methods and strategies presented. (Cross-listed as EDU-445)

MUS-445   Band Pedagogy and Practicum1 credit

Prerequisites:MUS-342

Corequisites:MUS-122

This class will specialize in methods and materials unique to teaching band. It will include the opportunity to receive coaching and mentoring while conducting a band (The College of Idaho Concert Band) in rehearsal and concert scenarios.

EDU-445.1   Foreign Language, ESL & Bilingual Methods3 credits

Prerequisites:MFL-444.1 strongly recommended.

This course reinforces and extends students' knowledge of second language acquisition theory and practice in the context of standards-based language education. Course content also includes cross-cultural awareness and discussion of sociological issues pertaining to minority student education. Students will utilize ESL, Bilingual, and foreign language methods in lesson planning and microteaching, visit language classes, and create a theme-based unit that incorporates the multiple methods and strategies presented. (Cross-listed as MFL-445)

EDU-446   Linguistics for Language Teachers3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or Senior standing.

Alt. years. A study of the central concepts of linguistic theory. Includes the theoretical areas of pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology; and the applied areas of language variation, first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and written language. Students will acquire the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as an essential tool for disciplined examination of linguistic phenomena. Issues of sociolinguistics will be addressed as students wrestle with the relationship between language, thought, and culture, and the nature of the cognitive and brain systems that relate to language learning, language teaching, and language use.(Cross-listed as ENG/MFL-446)

ENG-446   Linguistics for Language Teachers3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing.

A study of the central concepts of linguistic theory. Includes the theoretical areas of pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology; and the applied areas of language variation, first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and written language. Students will acquire the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as an essential tool for disciplined examination of linguistic phenomena. Issues of socio-linguistics will be addressed as students wrestle with the relationship between language, thought, and culture, and the nature of the cognitive and brain systems that relate to language learning, language teaching and language use. (Cross-listed as MFL-446 and EDU-446)

MFL-446   Linguistics for Language Teachers3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing

A study of the central concepts of linguistic theory. Includes the theoretical areas of pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology; and the applied areas of language variation, first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and written language. Students will acquire the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as an essential tool for disciplined examination of linguistic phenomena. Issues of sociolinguistics will be addressed as students wrestle with the relationship between language, thought, and culture, and the nature of the cognitive and brain systems that relate to language learning, language teaching, and language use. (Cross-listed as ENG-446)

EDU-447   Theoretical Foundations for Bilingual Educations & ESL3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing.

An overview of legal mandates and an analysis of the models and typologies of bilingual education and second / foreign language programs that aim to achieve bilingualism and biliteracy in a multicultural society. The course examines the sociocultural issues surrounding linguistic minority education from a historical perspective as well as from a contemporary and local perspective. The course explores the design, implementation, and adaptation of curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of the community in its demographic context.(Cross-listed as MFL-447)

MFL-447   Theoretical Foundations/Bilingual Ed/ESL3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing

An overview of legal mandates and an analysis of the models and typologies of bilingual education and second / foreign language programs that aim to achieve bilingualism and biliteracy in a multicultural society. The course examines the socio-cultural issues surrounding linguistic minority education from a historical perspective as well as from a contemporary and local perspective. The course explores the design, implementation, and adaptation of curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of the community in its demographic context. (Cross-listed as EDU-447)

EDU-448   Teaching Academic Content to English Learners3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing with a strong foundation in pedagogy.

The course prepares mainstream teachers to work effectively with culturally and linguistically diverse students in content area classrooms. Readings and discussions will explore best practices for students from the culture of poverty. Participants will develop lessons and units of study that incorporate the critical components of sheltered instruction for English learners.(Cross-listed as MFL-448) Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing with a strong foundation in pedagogy

MFL-448   Teaching Academic Content to English Learners3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing with a strong foundation in pedagogy.

The course prepares mainstream teachers to work effectively with culturally and linguistically diverse students in content area classrooms. Readings and discussions will explore best practices for students from the culture of poverty. Participants will develop lessons and units of study that incorporate the critical components of sheltered instruction for English learners. (Cross-listed as EDU-448)

BIO-450   Biology Capstone Seminar3 credits

Prerequisites:Senior standing

A capstone seminar course focuses on topics that integrate molecular, cellular, organismal, and population processes; course topics vary. Readings, lectures, and discussions. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

CSC-450   Advanced Computer Architecture3 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-160, CSC-340 and CSC-350. The prerequisite courses must be passed with minimum grades of C.

Continued investigation of the principles and theory behind the design of modern computing systems with a quantitative emphasis on issues of performance, efficiency and reliability. Topics may include: pipelining, instruction set design, caches and memory hierarchy, superscalar architectures, out-of-order and multithreaded architectures, parallel computing, and cloud-based computing.

EDU-451   Practicum in Reading3 credits

Prerequisites:EDU-352

A closely supervised program that provides students with experience in reading centers in elementary schools, under the guidance of the reading teacher and the college instructor. Five hours per week in field work during fall/spring semester or ten hours per week in winter session.

MAT-451   Real Analysis3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

A study of the basic concepts of real analysis. Topics include limits, sequences, series, continuity, differentiation and integration.

BUS-453   Principles of Production & Operations Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-350

Studies the development of operational planning consistent with the organization's business strategies. Topics include capacity planning, facility location and layout, allocating resources, inventories, scheduling, and projects. Extensive use of computers.

CSC-455   Numerical Computation3 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-152 and MAT-361. The prerequisite courses must be passed with minimum grades of C.

This course is concerned with numerical methods for applied mathematical problems, beginning with development and proceeding through implementation and analysis. Topics may include error analysis, root finding, interpolation and polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations, and approximation theory.

BUS-461   Marketing Research3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-360

A study of the concepts and techniques necessary to design, conduct, and manage market research projects from the inception to completion. The course is centered on the market research process, including problem definition, research design, data collection methods, statistical analysis, as well as the interpretation, presentation, and application of results.

MAT-461   Algebraic Structures3 credits

Prerequisites:MAT-299T with a minimum grade of C.

An introduction to the study of abstract algebra. Topics will be primarily from the theory of groups and rings.

BUS-466   Consumer Behavior3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-360

A study of how consumer psychological processes interact with both social and situational influences to shape consumer perceptions, decision-making processes, and purchase behavior. The social identity of distinctive groups of consumers who express ethnic, age-related, or lifestyle values through market and media choices will also be examined.

BUS-469   Marketing Strategy3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-360

Focuses on the major issues faced by marketing managers, synthesizing the concepts, definitions, and models students have studied in prior marketing course into a broad understanding of marketing and its strategic application. Case studies and a marketplace simulation will address problems and decisions found in profit and nonprofit, small, medium, and large firms operating in domestic, foreign, and multinational environments.

HIS-470   History Capstone1 credit

Prerequisites:Junior standing and permission.

A capstone for the history minor, students will expand and improve a paper previously written in a history course, providing new research in primary and recent, relevant secondary sources. The faculty member who oversaw the original paper will supervise the project.

HIS-480   Senior Thesis: historiography2 credits

Prerequisites:HIS-280, junior standing, permission and completion of two "Research Intensive" courses from two different regional distribution areas

Students will research a major area of historical study and write a substantial evaluative essay on its historiography. The department must approve the topic.

SOC-480   Sociological Theories3 credits

A study of the history and development of theories of society and group behavior. Classical and contemporary sociological theories emphasized.

POE-480   Senior Thesis3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Students will research, write and present a scholarly paper on the topic of their choosing. The Department must approve the topic.

CSC-480   480 Software Engineering and Senior Design I2 credits

Prerequisites:CSC-235, CSC-270, and CSC-350. CSC-270 and CSC-350 may be taken concurrently with CSC-480. Senior standing. The prerequisite courses must be passed with minimum grades of C

First course in a three-semester sequence in which students learn and apply sound principles and methods of software engineering. Topics may include models of software development, requirement solicitation and definition, system design and organization, documentation, verification, and validation.

HIS-481   Senior Honors Thesis: monograph4 credits

Prerequisites:HIS-480

Students will research, write and present a scholarly paper on a topic of their choosing.

CSC-481   Software Engineering and Senior Design II1 credit

Prerequisites:CSC-480. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C

Continuation of CSC-480. Second course in a three-term sequence in which students learn and apply sound principles and methods of software engineering. Topics may include models of software development, requirement solicitation and definition, system design and organization, documentation, verification, and validation.

BUS-482   Database Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-385.1

Introduction to database management systems, including: relational models; normalization; security, integrity and recovery issues; query interfaces; data analysis, design, implementation and basic application development using Microsoft Access.

CSC-482   482 Software Engineering and Senior Design III 3 credits

Prerequisites: CSC-481. The prerequisite course must be passed with a minimum grade of C.

Continuation of CSC-481. The final course in a three-term sequence in which students learn and apply sound principles and methods of software engineering. The course culminates in the design and implementation of software systems for industry, non-profit, or academic sponsors.

BUS-483   Project Management3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-150. Students with junior or senior standing will have better background for this course.

Examination of how projects can be managed from start to finish, including specific emphasis on planning and controlling to avoid common pitfalls. Includes software applications and configuration management. Topics include identifying needs, defining requirements, project costing, scheduling, resource allocation, and project politics. All students, regardless of major, are encouraged to enroll. Students with Junior or Senior standing will have a better background for this course.

BUS-485   Information Systems Analysis & Design3 credits

Prerequisites:BUS-385.1

Examination of analysis and logical design of business processes and management information systems focusing on the systems development life cycle; techniques for gathering and analyzing information systems requirements; and use of various techniques for logical system design. Topics include concepts, methods, and tools for the development of information systems management. This is a useful supplement to programming classes in the Mathematics department.

ATH-490   Seminar in Social Research3 credits

Prerequisites:SOC-100 or ATH-101

An introduction to the methods of qualitative field research and data analysis. Students will formulate and carry out an independent research project and formally present the results.(Cross-listed with SOC-490)

MUS-490   Senior Recital1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Performed for a public audience at the end of the senior year, this is the culminating project for music performers. As part of this process students demonstrate proficiency in analyzing music and in writing about music, and then prepare and perform, at the highest artistic and technical level, a substantive recital.

SOC-490   Seminar in Social Research3 credits

Prerequisites:SOC-100 or ATH-101

An introduction to the methods of qualitative field research and data analysis. Students will formulate and carry out an independent research project and formally present the results. (Cross-listed as ATH-490)

ENG-490   Literary Research Practicum1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course offers serious students of literature the opportunity to gain hands-on experience performing literary research and working with archived materials. Students will be introduced to some of the principles of literary research and, under the guidance of the professor, conduct research using primary materials.

BIO-490   Laboratory Assistant1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Laboratory assistants gain experience in laboratory techniques and science education by working closely with faculty and staff preparing teaching laboratories. All Laboratory Assistants must submit a Laboratory Assistant Agreement to the department chair. May be repeated for credit up to 3 times.

SPA-490   Spanish Major Capstone1 credit

Prerequisites:Senior standing and Instructor permission

A capstone course designed for students within six credits of completion of the Spanish Major requirements and who are co-enrolled in an upper division literature or professional course; required for the Spanish Major. Students demonstrate their consummate communication competencies and knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures and literatures by means of a research paper, a formal oral presentation, and an oral proficiency interview. In this course students compile a portfolio for Spanish majors preparing for the next step into graduate school or the professional world

THE-490F   Theatre Senior Project1 credit Fall, 2 credits Spring credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

The Theatre Senior Project is a capstone course comprised of a research component and a demonstration of acquired skills and abilities. The course encourages the students to prepare for life beyond The College of Idaho (in graduate study or in the professional theatre) and helps prepare them for this next step. In the fall, theatre majors will consider their immediate plans for after graduation and research both graduate programs in which they are interested (including application and audition/interview criteria for those programs, etc.) and cities in which they are considering pursuing a career in theatre. In the fall, students register for THE-490F for one (1) credit. In the spring, the students will prepare a showcase applicable to their concentration (scenes and audition piece, design portfolios, resumes, articles, scripts, etc.) and present them to an audience and/or invited representatives from area theatres and producing companies. In the spring, students register for THE-490S for two (2) credits.

MUS-491   Music Minor Capstone1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

As a final project for music minors students write a reflective essay and complete a comprehensive exam that involves listening and writing. A study guide will be provided to help guide students in their preparations for the exam. This course is to be completed concurrently with the final course taken to complete the minor, or no later than one semester after the minor's completion.

SPA-493   Research in Spanish3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A research project, arranged with an advisory committee, culminating in a paper written in accordance with the committee's guidelines.

ATH-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Intensive reading or field research in a specific area of anthropology, requiring a formal paper summarizing the study. See independent study guidelines.

ART-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Approved reading and research studies in art history. See independent study guidelines.

KIN-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Special research projects on selected topics. See independent study guidelines.

BUS-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research in the field of concentration for qualified students. See independent study guidelines.

CHE-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Reading or laboratory assignments as approved by the instructor . See independent study guidelines.

EDU-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individual research including selected reading and assigned writings. See independent study guidelines.

ENG-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A sustained and self-directed study of a particular topic under the guidance of a professor in the department. Independent studies cannot substitute for specific course requirements for the major or minor. See independent study guidelines.

HIS-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Reading or research in history as approved by the instructor. See independent study guidelines.

MAT-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research studies for qualified mathematics majors. See independent study guidelines.

CSC-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing and permission

May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits and is subject to arrangement with the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Department. See independent study guidelines.

PHY-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits and is subject to arrangement with the Mathematical and Physical Science Department. See independent study guidelines.

BIO-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Library research in biology. Critical review of literature pertaining to a problem or specialized topic in biology culminating in a paper written according to department guidelines. See independent study guidelines.

ENV-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A guided research project (library, field, or both) culminating in a research paper written according to program guidelines. May also result in a website, poster, audiovisual presentation or other public report. See independent study guidelines.

MFL-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A special research project on a selected topic in literature or civilization. See independent study guidelines.

MUS-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Special topics designed for music majors and minors. See independent study guidelines.

REL-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research studies in religion for qualified students. See independent study guidelines.

PHI-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research studies in philosophy for qualified students. See independent study guidelines.

PSY-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Intensive independent study of, or research in, special topics in psychology. It is highly unlikely that permission will be given to students without advanced standing and the preparation necessary for doing original thinking at the undergraduate level. It is strongly suggested that the psychology majors expecting to attend graduate school use this option to conduct original research. Students engaged in research are required to observe the guidelines of the American Psychological Association. See independent study guidelines.

SOC-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Intensive reading or field research in a specific area of sociology, requiring a formal paper summarizing the study. See independent study guidelines.

THE-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Advanced problems in theatre not covered in courses normally available. See internship guidelines.

POE-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A research paper for students pursuing a major or minor in Politics and Economics or International Political Economy. See independent study guidelines.

ASN-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research for capstone senior project to be conducted in consultation with a project advisor. Students must design, propose, and execute an original project to be formally presented to Asian Studies faculty and students. See independent study guidelines.

HSC-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Library research in health sciences. Critical review of literature pertaining to a problem or specialized topic in the health sciences culminating in a paper. See independent study guidelines.

JOURN-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Research project on selected topics. See independent study guidelines.

LAS-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Intensive reading or research in Latin American Studies, conducted in consultation with a Latin American Studies faculty member. See independent study guidelines.

LSP-494   Independent Study1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This culminating experience provides students with the opportunity to pursue an approved interdisciplinary project of choice to increase their understanding of leadership effectiveness in the real world. See independent study guidelines.

CHE-495   Chemistry Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory research project culminating in a paper or poster written in accordance with departmental guidelines. The work will make an original contribution to the science of chemistry.

BIO-495   Research Methods and Techniques2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory course in selected areas such as cell biology and toxicology or molecular biology or bioinformatics. Working in a research group students critically evaluate scientific literature and solve problems using laboratory techniques typical of the selected area of study. Students enrolled in this course will be actively engaged in laboratory research and will be expected to conduct research projects outside of the scheduled class time period.

KIN-496   Collaborative Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory or field research problem culminating in a paper written according to departmental guidelines.

ENG-496   Creative Writing Capstone Seminar3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A cross-genre course for Creative Writing majors in which students will propose and work on independent projects. Creative writers will approach writing and their works as professionals--i.e., thinking long-term beyond the classroom and considering marketing their work. In addition to writing intensively, students will help design the reading list, contextualize their work and writing styles within a literary tradition and genre, and create a community of writers.

BIO-496   Biology Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:BIO-396

A laboratory or field research problem culminating in a paper or other final presentation according to departmental guidelines. Students enrolled in BIO-496 must complete relevant safety training prior to beginning laboratory or field work. In addition, students must complete a course in research ethics such as Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) or equivalent by mid-term. See independent study guidelines.

PSY-496   Collaborative Research1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A laboratory or applied research culminating in a paper or other project. Conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in psychology. Examples of final projects would be an APA style paper or presenting a paper or poster at a psychology conference.

LSP-496   Leadership Seminar3 credits

Prerequisites:LSP-299T (any version)

May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. A continuous series of seminars each semester for seniors. Leadership competencies such as communication, problem solving, decision making, objective setting and self-development are emphasized throughout. Organizational sponsors and mentors are involved in the seminar.

MS-496   Military Science Internship1 credit

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A supervised, practical work experience which provides the senior Military Science students the opportunity to apply the skills they have learned through independent study and assisting in the instruction of military science labs or participation in the SMP (simultaneous membership program) in a National Guard or US Army Reserve Troop Program Unit. See internship guidelines.

ATH-497   Internship3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Supervised work or research with approval of the department. A term paper or formal report is required. Reading assignments may be required. See internship guidelines.

ART-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Specific internship projects which may include computer graphics, museum work, or various applied experiences in art. See internship guidelines.

KIN-497   Internship3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged internships at organizations such as the Idaho Youth Ranch, Idaho State School Hospital, YMCA and agencies to enhance students' educational opportunities. Term papers, reports or other assignments may be required. See internship guidelines.

BUS-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permision

Individually arranged and supervised internships with sponsors such as business organizations designed to provide practical experience in the field of concentration. Periodic reports and papers may be required. See internship guidelines.

CHE-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged programs of work and study with the department, academic institutions, private industries, or government agencies. A paper or the write up of a laboratory notebook is required. Does not fulfill requirements for the chemistry major. See internship guidelines.

EDU-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged internships appropriate for those who plan to enter the teaching profession. See internship guidelines.

ENG-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged internship designed to provide practical editorial and writing experience. An extended analysis of the experience is required and periodic reports may be assigned. See internship guidelines.

HIS-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged work designed to provide practical experience. An extended analysis of the experience is required and periodic reports may be assigned. See internship guidelines.

MAT-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged programs of work and study with the department, academic institutions, private industries, or government agencies. See internship guidelines.

CSC-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing and permission.

Individually arranged programs of work and study with the department, academic institutions, private industries, or government agencies. See internship guidelines. See internship guidelines.

PHY-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged programs of work and study with the department, academic institutions, private industries, or government agencies. See internship guidelines.

BIO-497   Research Internship1 - 6 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or Senior standing and Instructor permission

Research Internships are designed to give students independent research experience in the fields of their interest, and are coordinated through the Center for Experiential Learning (CEL). A written summary of the internship and a seminar are presented to the department at the conclusion of the internship. See internship guidelines.

ENV-497   Environmental Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Supervised work in an environmental field in an approved firm, agency or office. A written summary or other product and an oral presentation are presented at the conclusion of the internship. See internship guidelines.

MFL-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged and supervised service or research in a bilingual or target language environment. Internships will provide practical experience in the field of concentration. An extended analysis and periodic reports of the experience will be required. See internship guidelines.

MUS-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individualized fieldwork arranged and supervised with sponsors in professional musical activities. Designed to provide practical experience in the student's field of emphasis. Periodic reports are required. See internship guidelines.

REL-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged internships designed to provide practical experience in the work and organization of religious institutions. Periodic reports and papers may be required. See internship guidelines.

PSY-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Supervised work and study or research in an institution or with an organization providing for the application of psychological theories and principles to current problems. Students majoring in other fields are eligible for consideration. Students are required to observe the guidelines of the American Psychological Association. See internship guidelines.

SOC-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Supervised work or research with approval of department. A term paper or formal report is required. Reading assignments may be required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission See internship guidelines.

THE-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Individually arranged and supervised internship with a sponsor such as The Idaho Shakespeare Festival. Designed to provide practical experience in the student's area of interest. Periodic reports and papers may be required. See internship guidelines.

POE-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A supervised internship designed to provide practical experience in the field of Politics and Economics or International Political Economy. Periodic reports and papers may be required. See internship guidelines.

HSC-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or senior standing and permission.

Internships are designed to give students experience in their fields of interest. A written summary of the internship and an oral presentation are required at the conclusion of the internship. See internship guidelines.

JOURN-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permisssion

Individually arranged internship designed to provide practical experience in journalism. Students will be placed with magazines, newspapers, radio and television stations, interactive companies, photographers or web designers. See internship guidelines.

LAS-497   Internship1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Supervised service work in an approved organization, firm, agency, or office. A written summary or other form of presentation is submitted at the end of the internship to a Latin American Studies faculty member. See internship guidelines.

LSP-497   Internship3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

The intern will assume the role of leadership at an approved site to apply the theoretical aspects of leadership in a real organization. In addition to meeting the onsite requirement of the internship sponsor, students will share their interpretation of organizational dynamics during campus seminar sessions. See internship guidelines.

KIN-498   Sport Science Seminar1 credit

Prerequisites:Senior standing.

A critical review of current research and related topics in sport science as well as seminars and lectures on topics of current interest in sport science.

BUS-498   Executive Seminar3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Seminars conducted by executives in residence or visiting executives on their industry or specific business. With the help of their advisors, participating students complete a research project related to their career interest and the topic of the seminar.

ENG-498   Senior Thesis Seminar in Literature3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A capstone course for senior literature majors designed to help students move toward post-college study. Students will propose, research, write, and revise a senior thesis for formal presentation. In addition, students will research and compose an individualized reading list based on their interests and post-graduate plans. Lists may focus on American, British, or world literature, graduate record exam preparation, or literature ancillary to secondary education teaching.

MAT-498   Upper-Division Seminar1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Junior or Senior standing with major in mathematics.

Study of topics in mathematics not covered in previous mathematics courses. May be repeated for credit.

PHI-498   Philosophy Seminar1 - 4 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Advanced study in philosophy with intensive reading in such topics as ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics or the theory of knowledge, as selected by the instructors. Students completing their major will present a paper to the class. Course is 1 credit per year for a maximum of 4 credits.

PSY-498   Psychology Capstone3 credits

Prerequisites:PSY-312 and senior standing.

The capstone course will investigate the field of psychology with the goal of presenting the discipline in social context. Students will respond to readings from the primary literature in psychology which summarize specific areas of the discipline culminating in a term project or paper. A practical investigation of the student's future career will be undertaken and result in materials necessary for application for jobs and/or graduate careers in the field. Each student will take the Major Fields Test in psychology before the end of the term.

POE-498   Senior Seminar: Politics & Economics3 credits

Prerequisites:Complete the introductory core of the Political Economy major.

Advanced study in political/economic theory involving intensive reading, writing, and discussion.

REL-498   Religious Studies Seminar3 credits

An advanced study of the foundational methods and theories of religious studies and recent trends in the field.

IND-499   Business/Arts Interdisciplinary Seminar1 credit

Prerequisites:Senior standing.

This interdisciplinary senior seminar will include visiting lectures from professionals in the arts and related businesses. Discussions will allow students to share common concerns and present senior projects.

BIO-499   Senior Comprehensive Examination0 credits

A written comprehensive examination designed to measure the full range of students' understanding of biology. To pass BIO-499, a student must pass the written exam according to the criteria set by the Biology Department. Students failing to score a passing grade must pass an Oral Comprehensive exam given by the biology faculty in the following Winter or Spring term.

REL-499   Senior Thesis1 - 2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A capstone experience for senior religion majors in which they will propose, research, write and revise a senior thesis for formal presentation.

PHI-499   Senior Thesis1 - 2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A capstone experience for senior philosophy majors in which they will propose, research, write, and revise a senior thesis for formal presentation.

POE-499   Senior Seminar: International Political Economy3 credits

Prerequisites:Complete the introductory core of the International Political Economy major.

A reflective survey of international political economy. The ideas and theories of classic and modern thinkers in the field will provide a springboard for student discussion, research and writing.

LAS-499   Senior Project2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

A capstone experience for Latin American Studies students designed to synthesize their major field of study and interest in Latin American Studies into a portfolio, project, paper, or other format. Students will work in consultation with a project advisor and one other Latin American Studies faculty member who will serve as a reader. Students must design, propose, and complete the project according to the Latin American Studies senior project guidelines, and will make a formal presentation to the campus community. Students may write and present in either Spanish or English.

BUS-499   Business and Accounting Capstone3 credits

Prerequisites:ACC-222, BUS-270, BUS-325, BUS-330, BUS-350, BUS-360, and Senior standing

The Business Capstone course will provide opportunity for each student to integrate and apply all of what he/she has learned. As a true liberal arts capstone, students will need to draw on their knowledge of areas such as politics, culture,history, math and business, to analyze organizational situations and recommend effective solutions. Students will develop written analyses and practical solutions for organizational issues. Throughout the capstone experience,students will utilize simulations, case studies,individual research papers and team projects to learn how to be successful in twenty first century organizations.

BUS-499T   Special Topics in Business1 - 3 credits

Topics vary.

HIS-499T   Special Topics in History1 - 3 credits

See courses listed below.

JOURN-499T   Special Topics in Interactive Journalism1 credit

Topics vary.

CHE-499T   Special Topics in Chemistry1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

Study of selected areas of chemistry not available in the regular curriculum.

HIS-499T.1   Research Seminar: Anglican Foreign Missions and the British Empire2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will operate as an advanced-level research seminar. Students will work in primary sources, both printed and manuscript, to write and present short pieces of original research centering on the creation of religious and imperial ideologies of expansion, social transformation, race and rule in the British Empire, 1850-1920.

HIS-499T.2   Reading Seminar: Imperialism in Modern East Asia2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will operate as an advanced-level readings seminar. Students will engage in intensive readings of some of the more influential secondary literature on imperialism in China, Japan, and Korea during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will be required to read at least one monograph each week and provide written and oral presentations on the readings.

HIS-499T.3   Reading Seminar: Society & Culture in Modern China2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will operate as an advanced-level readings seminar. Students will read some of the more influential secondary literature on the social and cultural history of modern China. Students will be required to read at least one monograph each week and provide written and oral presentations on the readings.

HIS-499T.4   Reading Seminar: Society & Culture in Modern Japan2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will operate as an advanced-level readings seminar. Students will read some of the more influential secondary literature on the social and cultural history of Japan from the Edo period through the early twentieth century. Students will be required to read at least one monograph each week and provide written and oral presentations on the readings.

HIS-499T.5   Reading Seminar: The Body in Chinese History2 credits

Prerequisites:Instructor permission

This course will operate as an advanced-level readings seminar. Students will engage in intensive readings of some of the more influential secondary literature on gender, medicine, and the body in Chinese history. Students will be required to read at least one monograph each week and provide written and oral presentations on the readings.

HSC-499X   Health Sciences Seminar3 credits

Prerequisites:Senior standing

An integration and synthesis of different disciplinary perspectives as they relate to specific regional, national, or world health issues. Students will read about, discuss, and analyze health care issues, and learn from people working in the health care industry. The seminar will be dependent on contributions and research done by each student. Topics will vary.

EDU-501   Teaching in a Diverse Society3 credits

A survey of issues surrounding the education of students from a diverse population in a pluralistic society. Topics of study include culture, race, ethnicity, and religion. Cultural issues impacting students academically, socially, and emotionally will be addressed. Strategies for working with parents from non-dominant cultures will be discussed. NOTE: This course may be offered as EDU-501F (fall, 2 credits) and EDU-501W (winter, 1 credit). When the course is offered in this manner, students must complete both the fall and winter sections.

EDU-502   Theoretical Foundations of Bilingual & ESL Education3 credits

An overview of legal mandates and an analysis of the models and typologies of bilingual education and second language programs that aim to achieve bilingualism and biliteracy. The course examines the socio-cultural issues surrounding linguistic minority education from a historical perspective as well as from a contemporary and local perspective.

EDU-503   Second Language Acquisition Theory & Practice3 credits

Introduces principal areas of research, major theoretical issues in the field and the current methodologies related to second language (L2) acquisition with related analysis of first language acquisition. Students will explore the relationships between the research and issues with that of actual classroom second language learning and teaching. The course is taken in conjunction with a field experience.

EDU-504   Multicultural Literature for Children & Adolescents3 credits

A study of literature appropriate for young people that represents other than the dominant culture of North America. Works representing Latino culture will be emphasized.

EDU-505   ESL & Bilingual Methods3 credits

Second language acquisition theory and practice in the context of standards-based education. Course content includes cross-cultural awareness and discussion of sociological issues pertaining to minority student education. Students will utilize ESL, Bilingual, and foreign language methods in lesson planning and teaching,

EDU-512   Linguistics3 credits

Central concepts of linguistic theory are the focus of this course. It includes the theoretical areas of pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology; and the applied areas of language variation, first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and written language. Participants will acquire the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as an essential tool for disciplined examination of linguistic phenomena. Issues of sociolinguistics will be addressed as participants wrestle with the relationship between language, thought, culture, and the nature of the cognitive and brain systems that relate to language learning, language teaching, and language use.

EDU-513   Curriculum Design3 credits

Historical, philosophical, and contemporary issues in curriculum development will be explored. Participants will investigate implications for curriculum alignment to address the assessment of state and national standards.

EDU-520   Assessment for Learning2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

The course is designed to guide future teachers through the various processes of educational assessment. The relationship among teaching, learning, and assessment will be emphasized. Special emphasis will be placed upon creating, administering, analyzing, and communicating the results of teacher-made tests for classroom application. Interpretation of standardized tests will also be addressed.

EDU-530   Art Methods for Elementary Teachers1 credit

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

This course is designed to prepare future elementary and art teachers in awareness, skills, theories, and practices in K-8 art education. Child growth and development, curriculum selection and planning, classroom management, assessment strategies, and basic historical and aesthetic learning methods will be addressed.

EDU-532   Language Arts Methods for Elementary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

Elementary teachers must demonstrate a high level of competence in the use of English language arts. They must understand and use concepts from reading, language and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills, and to help students successfully apply these skills to many different situations, materials and ideas.

EDU-533   Social Studies Methods for Elementary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

This course will provide future teachers with an understanding of the Idaho social studies standards for elementary and middle school students. The pedagogy most appropriate for conveying the content of the social studies will be modeled and taught. Multidisciplinary, thematic and literacy approaches will be emphasized.

EDU-534   Science Methods for Elementary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

This class will emphasize the instructional and management techniques necessary to teach science to elementary students. A variety of instructional strategies will be discussed and modeled. Lessons using hands on and inquiry approaches will be prepared and taught. Safety issues will be addressed. The state science standards will be used as a basis for developing lessons.

EDU-535   Physical Education Methods for Elementary Teachers1 credit

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

Physical activity is critical to healthy learning. In this class students will develop lessons incorporating movement into core classroom instruction. Students will coordinate with school physical education teachers to integrate movement and content.

EDU-540   Art Methods for Secondary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

This is a study of the methods and materials appropriate to teach art at the level of middle, junior or senior high students. Topics to be considered include: philosophy of secondary art education, alignment of subject matter knowledge and Idaho state standards for visual arts, methods of art instruction, art curriculum (scope and sequence), lesson planning, assessment, budget, exhibits and portfolio development.

EDU-541   Science Methods for Secondary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

This course serves as a practical foundation for pre-service teachers to formulate a basis to teach science at the secondary level in a manner that is exciting, creative, and rigorous. Techniques for promoting inquiry and discovery, in addition to laboratory safety and classroom management concerns will be investigated. Course activities will provide a basis for the development of competent, reflective professional science educators, including familiarity with relevant journals, resources, and continuing science education.

EDU-542   Mathematics Methods for Secondary Teachers2 credits

Admission to Internship. The emphasis of this class is on the mathematics that is taught in the middle and high school levels. The Idaho mathematics standards will be used in analyzing curriculum and preparing lessons. A variety of teaching techniques and methods will be described and modeled. The use of manipulatives, calculators and computers will be included.

EDU-543   Social Studies Methods for Secondary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

A study of the methods and materials appropriate to the level of middle and senior high school students. Emphasis will be given to the theoretical understanding of the nature and history of social studies as a broad field of study and to the various concepts, methods, and strategies used to teach it. Special consideration will be given to an examination of the content, substantive, and syntactic knowledge necessary to teach the various social studies disciplines in the secondary schools. The critical component of the course will be the creation and teaching of social studies units as part of the internship placement.

EDU-544   Language Arts Methods for Secondary Teachers2 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to Internship.

Secondary English teachers must understand the content and structure of the English language and the variety of ways ideas can be organized within the field. In this course students will review research and practice in the areas of reading, writing, literature, as well as the grammar and mechanics of the English language. Assignments for this class may be included as artifacts in your professional portfolio.

EDU-580   Projects in Professional Development3 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to MAT, successful completion of internship year.

Candidates will apply what they have learned about becoming an educational leader to prepare professional development plans and initiating work on their plan by completing a project related to their first teaching assignment.

EDU-593   Professional Development1 - 5 credits

Prerequisites:Earned Bachelor's Degree.

These courses are designed to provide graduate credit for professional development courses for educators. This credit is not normally used to meet degree requirements.

EDU-595   Elementary School Practicum2 - 9 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to teacher education and admission to Internship.

The course includes working in one or more K-8 classroom setting/s where candidates observe, plan lessons, participate in parent conferences, teach lessons and assess learning. Program requirements include completing fall, winter and spring practicum experiences.

EDU-596   Secondary School Practicum4 - 11 credits

Prerequisites:Admission to teacher education and admission to Internship.

The course includes working in one or more 8-12 grade classroom setting/s where candidates observe, plan lessons, participate in parent conferences, teach lessons and assess learning. Program requirements include completing fall, winter and spring practicum experiences.

EDU-597   Internship Seminar1 credit

Corequisites:Elementary School Practicum or Secondary School Practicum.

This seminar supports candidates as they plan, teach, assess learning and complete their professional portfolios. Program requirements include completing internship seminars during fall, winter and spring of the internship year.

EDU-598   Field Experience1 credit

Observe, practice, and document second language instructional methods within elementary and secondary classrooms. Twenty-five hours of documented experience is expected. May be repeated.

EDU-599   Practicum1 credit

Opportunities to apply and document techniques associated with bilingual instruction. Twenty-five hours per credit is required. May be repeated.

EDU-611   Foundations of Instructional Leadership3 credits

An investigation into the models of leadership, school organization, leadership strategies, and the climate of current educational reform. The intent is to develop effective educational change agents.

EDU-612   Research Methods & Design3 credits

An overview of qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and their application and an introduction to research design. Candidates will design their research projects.

EDU-613   Instruction & Technology2 credits

An advanced look at the integration of technology and instruction, including hypermedia, web page design, and the use of the Internet for instructional purposes.

EDU-634   Current Trends in Education3 credits

A study of current trends in American educational reform emphasizing the nature of change in learning organizations; the role of technological innovation; current research on learning; international education systems on educational reform. Specific reform movements will be explored such as: standards-based curriculum; technology-infused classrooms; voucher systems; home schooling; charter schools; site-based management; concept-based instruction and brain-based learning.

EDU-680   Thesis Preparation3 credits

Prerequisites:Completion of Internship.

This course will assist MAT candidates in interpreting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. It will also deal with document formatting and editing.

EDU-681   Thesis Completion1 credit

This course supports MAT and M.Ed. students in the process of completing their thesis under the guidance of the chair of their thesis committee. The course is pass/fail and may be repeated.

EDU-694   Independent Study3 credits

A student-designed study intended to enhance an area of expertise.

EDU-697   MAT Seminar1 credit

Corequisites:Elementary School Practicum or Secondary School Practicum.

May be repeated. This seminar supports MAT candidates as they refine their thesis project and collect and analyze data.

EDU-698   M.Ed. Seminar1 credit

May be repeated. This seminar supports M.Ed. candidates as they refine their thesis project and collect and analyze data.

EDU-699T.1   Special Topics: Advanced Curriculum Theory & Design3 credits

This course examines the history of curriculum development in American education and explores alternative models of curriculum design. Emphasis will be placed upon the role of teacher created curriculum within the context of current educational reform initiatives.

EDU-699T.2   Special Topics: Reading in Critical Pedagogy3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts and practices of critical pedagogy. Students will examine the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of critical pedagogy. Readings will lead to an investigation of the extent to which critical theory, postmodernism, constructivism and feminism are intersecting traditions that have informed critical pedagogy. In addition, students will explore whether or not critical pedagogy is present in their own practice.

EDU-699T.3   Special Topics: Action Research3 credits

This course is designed to provide MAT candidates with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct research within a classroom setting. Students will be introduced to the elements required to begin an action research project, including purpose/rationale, writing style, literature reviews, online resources, data collection, and components of an action research project. Students will also identify ethical issues related to research, including basic theory and practice, professional codes of ethics, confidentiality, and research using human subjects. The purpose of statistics, as applied to educational research, is introduced; inferential and descriptive measures are examined and methods for evaluating and analyzing data are discussed.