Academic Departments and Programs

Education

As a student in The College of Idaho's Department of Education, you will gain a thorough knowledge of educational theory, best teaching practices, and the content you can apply in the classroom. We are committed to improving student learning in K-12 classrooms by preparing you to be an outstanding teacher. The department works collaboratively with K-12 practitioners, professional organizations, policy makers, and other departments across campus to support our students' development as outstanding educators. Field experiences in K-12 classrooms are integrated with coursework throughout the program. Students preparing for elementary certification complete an interdisciplinary major that provides pedagogy as well as a significant background in mathematics, science, history, and social studies in addition to a minor in the humanities and fine arts. Students preparing to teach at the secondary level complete a content major in their first teaching field, a minor in education, and additional minors in two other PEAKS. One of these minors is normally a second teaching field.

Both the elementary and secondary preparation programs culminate in a fifth-year internship with placements in multiple grade levels and, in the case of secondary candidates, different subject areas.

Students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program complete two summers of study in addition to the fifth-year internship as part of their graduate degree program. The department also offers a graduate degree in Curriculum and Instruction: TESOL and Bilingual for certified teachers. For more information, see the Graduate catalog.

Students completing programs leading to elementary or secondary education certification may elect to complete an endorsement for Literacy, Teaching English as a Second Language or Bilingual Education.

Why study Education at The College of Idaho?

In your education coursework and the rest of your classes at The College of Idaho, you'll experience professors who teach from the heart. Here, learning from experienced educators who have a passion for teaching, you're in the perfect place to embark on a career in which you will impact countless young lives as an elementary, middle or high school teacher.

THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

The Education Department at The College of Idaho strives to be an Educative Learning Community. The conceptual framework of our educative learning community is one based on John Dewey's understanding of educative experiences that encourage personal and community growth (Dewey & Archambault, 1964). It is a community where students are provided with a reflective, caring environment so that the process of becoming a teacher can be explored. It is a community where students are offered a vision of schooling that promotes and helps create a more just and democratic society.

COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS- An educative learning community counters the image of the teacher as a “technician' with one of the teacher as an active participant in issues that affect the larger educational community (Apple & Beane, 2007). Rather than avoid a discussion of values, this perspective advocates the necessity of such discussions because teaching is, at its core, a value-laden enterprise (Goodland, Soder, & Sirotnik, 1990). The program, based upon students who learn and grow together, encourages on going "conversations" about meaningful issues central to a liberal arts education.

CRITICAL & CARING PEDAGOGY- An educative learning community takes the position that a hopeful, democratic future depends upon educators committed to emancipatory education (Giroux, 1997). It reflects Landon Beyers' description of an emancipatory curriculum in teacher education as one that is designed to emphasize the following: equal access to knowledge, images of human equality, development of a “critical consciousness,' self-reflectivity, creativity, cultural acceptance, moral responsibility, democratic empowerment, and a pedagogy of caring (Beyer & Apple, 1998). It affirms Nel Noddings' belief that for schools to be true centers of learning, they must embrace caring in all its forms – care for self, for intimate others, for associates and acquaintances, for distant others, for nonhuman animals, for plants and the physical environment, for the human-made world of objects and instruments, and for ideas (Noddings, 2005).

CONSTRUCTIVIST LEARNING- An educative learning community takes a constructivist perspective toward classroom practice in which learning is seen as active, purposeful, and generated from within. This perspective, rooted in Piagetian principles of development and drawing on Vygotsky (Tryphon & Voneche, 1996), extends the notion of the construction of knowledge from one that is primarily an individualized and internal process to one that more comprehensively encompasses social foundations of thinking (Bruner, 1986). In this view, knowledge is not only embedded in socio-historical and socio-cultural elements, but is actually generated through shared interactions and individual internalization (Wertsch, 1991).

Student learning outcomes

Students will demonstrate oral and written communication skills.

  • Students will demonstrate problem solving skills.
  • Students will demonstrate analytical reasoning skills.
  • Students will demonstrate skills in critical thinking and reflection.
  • Student will articulate the role of education in a democratic society.
  • Students will describe the relationship between cognitive development and learning.
  • Students will discuss the interaction among culture, educational policy, and educational practice.

Career Opportunities for C of I Education Students

The College of Idaho has a proud tradition of producing top-notch educators. Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in teaching and school administration, earning countless awards, grants and recognitions for their outstanding work as educators in Idaho and around the world. Education majors may also go on to earn graduate and doctoral degrees and teach at the college level.

Majors

Interdisciplinary Studies for Elementary Precertification Major

Interdisciplinary Studies for Elementary Precertification Major

50-51 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

HIS-200

Introduction to the History of the United States

3

MAT-221

Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I

4

MAT-222

Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II

4

POE-100

Essentials of American Government

3

PSY-221

Educational Psychology

3

Complete 2 courses in different disciplines (at least one must include a laboratory component) from the following:

BIO-104

Introduction to Human Anatomy

3

BIO-129

Murder, Medicine and Magic and Laboratory

4

BIO-140

Idaho Natural History and Laboratory

4

BIO-201

Molecules to Cells and Laboratory

4

CHE-124

Forensic Chemistry

3

CHE-141

General Chemistry I

4

ENV-160

Environmental Science I and Laboratory

4

ENV-260

Environmental Science II and Laboratory

4

GOG-150

Geography

3

GOL-101

Geology

3

PHY-100

The Universe

3

Education Courses (these meet the PSE requirements):

EDU-202

Introduction to Teaching

3

EDU-301

Foundations of Schooling

3

EDU-304

Literacy Development

3

EDU-305

Literacy in Content Areas

3

EDU-350

Literature for Children and Adolescents

3

EDU-430

Teaching in a Diverse Society

3

EDU-441

Curriculum and Instruction

3

EDU-442

Teaching Exceptional Children

3

Complete 1 course from the following:

ELECTIVE

Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, Education or Political Economy

3

Note: This major crosses three PEAKs, therefore students completing the Interdisciplinary Studies for Elementary Precertification major will need to complete a minor in the Humanities and Fine Arts PEAK

Minors

This minor is a prerequisite for admission to the Fifth-Year and Master of Arts in Teaching programs that lead to state certification as an elementary or secondary teacher.

Candidates planning to teach at the secondary level must complete the education minor, a major that is approved as a first teaching field and a 20 credit second teaching field that meets the endorsement requirements for Idaho State Department of Education. In instances where the first and second teaching fields are in the same PEAK (e.g. chemistry and biology, math and physics, art and theater, kinesiology and health) it may be necessary for the third and fourth PEAK requirements to be met by a 15 to 20 credit individualized minor that includes courses from both of the remaining PEAK areas. The individualized minor must be approved by the chair of the Education Department and the Associate Academic Dean.

Education Minor

21 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

EDU-202

Introduction to Teaching

3

EDU-301

Foundations of Schooling

3

EDU-305

Literacy in Content Areas

3

EDU-430

Teaching in a Diverse Society

3

EDU-441

Curriculum and Instruction

3

EDU-442

Teaching Exceptional Children

3

PSY-221

Educational Psychology

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Dispositions to Teach
  • Oral and Written Communications
  • Analytical Skills
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Candidates will be able to develop lessons appropriate to the grade level and subject/s they will teach.
  • Candidates will be able to describe effective approaches to teaching reading in content areas.

The completion of this 20 credit minor qualifies a candidate for an Idaho Bilingual endorsement that can be added to an existing elementary or secondary teaching certificate.

Bilingual Education Minor

20 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

SPA

Upper-division (300 or 400- Level) Spanish Coursework

6

MFL-444 / EDU-444

Second Language Acquisition Theory and Practice

3

MFL-445 / EDU-445

Foreign Language, ESL and Bilingual Methods

3

MFL-446 / EDU-446

Linguistics for Language Teachers

3

MFL-447 / EDU-447

Theoretical Foundations for Bilingual Education and ESL

3

MFL / EDU 494/497

Field Experience in a culturally and linguistically diverse setting

2

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical Thinking
  • Analytical Skills
  • Problem Solving
  • Oral and Written Communication
  • Candidates will be able to demonstrate proficiency in Spanish
  • Candidates will be able to describe the leading theories of language acquisition.
  • Candidates will demonstrate dispositions that are appropriate for someone with will work in K-1 2 schools.
  • Candidates will be able to describe the relationship among language, thought, and culture.

The completion of this minor will allow students earning an elementary or secondary teaching certificate to add a literacy endorsement.

Literacy Education Minor

21 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

EDU-253

Language Development and Literacy

3

EDU-304

Literacy Development

3

EDU-305

Literacy in Content Areas

3

EDU-306

Writing Process and Assessment

3

EDU-350

Literature for Children and Adolescents

3

EDU-352

Diagnosis and Remediation

3

EDU-451

Practicum in Reading

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical Thinking
  • Analytical Skills
  • Problem Solving
  • Oral and Written Communication

This minor is designed for students who are pursuing secondary teaching certification in a different field but who also would like to meet the State of Idaho's requirements for English as a "second" teaching field. The minor will qualify a candidate to add a 6-12 English endorsement to a secondary teaching certificate (see Note below).

English as a Second Teaching Field Minor

24 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

EDU/MFL/ENG-446

Linguistics for Language Teachers

3

Complete 2 courses from the following:

ENG-247

Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-347

Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

JOUR-200

Principles and Practices of Journalism: Print

3

JOUR-300

Feature Writing

3

Complete 3 credits of 200-Level Introduction to Literary Studies Courses

ENG-210 to ENG-239

See English Department Course Descriptions

3

Complete 9 credits (with 6 credits being upper division 300-Level) from the following:

ENG

One Course emphasizing American Literature

3

ENG

One Course emphasizing English Literature

3

ENG

One Course emphasizing World Literature

3

Complete 3 credits in Fine Arts from the following subject areas:

ART

Art

3

MUS

Music

3

THE

Theatre

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Written and Oral Communication
  • Problem Solving
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Critical Thinking
  • Candidates will demonstrate dispositions appropriate to working as an educator.

Note: Though not part of the undergraduate minor, students will need to take EDU-544 Language Arts Methods for Secondary Teachers (2 crs) as part of the internship year to qualify for the English endorsement.

Teaching English as a Second Language Minor

20 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

EDU-430

Teaching in a Diverse Society

3

EDU-444/MFL-444

Second Language Acquisition Theory and Practice

3

EDU-445/MFL-445

Foreign Language, ESL and Bilingual Methods

3

EDU-446

Linguistics for Language Teachers

3

EDU-447

Theoretical Foundations for Bilingual Education and ESL

3

EDU

Field Experience in ESL Setting

1

SPA, FRE, GER or other MFL offering

Modern Foreign Language

4

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Oral and Written Communications
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Candidates will be able to describe the leading theories of language acquisition.
  • Candidates will demonstrate dispositions that are appropriate for someone with will work in K-12 schools.
  • Candidates will be able to describe the relationship among language, thought, and culture.

The completion of this minor will allow students earning a teaching certificate to add an endorsement for teaching Second Language Learners (ESL).