Academic Departments and Programs

English

The English Department encourages the study of the historical and cultural contexts of literature and language, the aesthetic pleasures and values of texts and writing, and the variety of voices and experiences represented in the global literary tradition. Our faculty also believes that acquiring superior reading, writing, and research skills is essential to a liberal arts education, and they will provide the individual mentoring that will help you reach your potential.

Why study English at The College of Idaho?

The English minors and majors are designed for the student who has interest in the formal study of literature as a form of cultural expression and in practicing literary research methods. The study of literature involves exploring the ways in which literature shapes and influences culture; the socio-cultural and historical contexts of literature; the politics of canonicity; the cultural assumptions that readers bring to texts; and major literary traditions and literary-theoretical perspectives.

Within the department, students may pursue their individual interests in literature, creative writing, and journalism. The Literature in English major offers study in the areas of American, British, and Postcolonial literature. The Creative Writing major features coursework in poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction and journalism. It is designed for any student with a serious interest in writing, including those who wish to enter a Master of Fine Arts program. Students also can choose to study Interactive Journalism, a minor which prepares students for an evolving field in which broadcast, print, and online journalism overlap more than ever. The Creative Writing focus is designed for the student who has interest in developing skills as a creative writer (in fiction, poetry, and/or creative nonfiction) and in pursuing the formal study of literature as a form of cultural expression. The study of creative writing involves producing original works of creative writing in more than one genre; exploring major literary traditions and literary-theoretical perspectives; examining the ways in which literature shapes and influences culture; recognizing the socio-cultural and historical contexts of literature; and examining one's own socio-cultural position as a writer.

In addition to the regular curriculum, The College of Idaho students can practice and develop their skills through independent studies and creative projects, internships with local businesses and agencies, work for the student-run college newspaper and literary magazine, and research with faculty. Interdisciplinary courses, off-campus study programs, and opportunities to work with professional writers enrich the study of literature and creative writing at The College of Idaho.

Student learning outcomes

  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Communicate clearly, persuasively and confidently in writing
  • Critically interpret literature
  • Understand and interpret literature as a form of human imagination and expression
  • Understand how literary traditions are informed by and reflect and shape the world
  • Critical Thinking

Career Opportunities for C of I English Students

Studying literature and writing prepares one to be a skilled, learned, and critically astute reader and thinker who can find success in many fields. The communication and analytical skills developed by English students are critical to successful careers in creative and professional writing, including teaching, social work, business, journalism, law, library and information professions, politics and development, and many other fields of work.

Majors

Literature in English Major

Literature in English Major

30 credits (Total does not include First-Year Seminar, ENG-100 or Foreign language courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG 200-level

Introduction to Literary Studies Courses

6

(to be completed by no later than end of sophomore year. Ideally students majoring or minoring in Literary Studies in English or Creative Writing majors will have taken two English courses at the 200-level before enrolling in 300-level literature courses.)

ENG-280

Theory and Methods of the Study of Literature

3

(Note: ENG-280 should be taken before enrolling in 300-level literature courses)

Complete 18 credits in literature seminar courses at the 300-level with at least 3 credits in each of the following areas:

American Literature

Complete at least 1 course from the following:

ENG-329

Inventing America

3

ENG-330

African American Literature

3

ENG-331

Gardens of American Literature

3

ENG-332

Adrienne Rich

3

ENG-333

Hemingway & Faulkner

3

ENG-334

Ecopoetics

3

ENG-335

The American Renaissance

3

English Literature before 1789

Complete at least 1 course from the following:

ENG-307

Origins and Traditions of English Literature

3

ENG-308

Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson

3

ENG-309

The Epic Tradition

3

English Literature after 1789

Complete at least 1 course from the following:

ENG-315

The Supernatural in British Literature

3

ENG-316

The Brontës

3

ENG-317

Nineteenth-century British Fiction

3

ENG-318

Prize Books

3

ENG-319

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-320

Twentieth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

Postcolonial Literature

Complete at least 1 course from the following:

ENG-322

V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie

3

ENG-323

Postcolonial Studies

3

ENG-324

Narratives Against Oppression

3

ENG-325

Constructing World Literatures

3

Other 300-Level Seminar Courses

ENG-338

Postmodern Literature

3

Note: 6 additional credits in Seminars are required from any of the above listed 300-level seminars to satisfy the required 18 credits.

Senior Seminar

ENG-498

Senior Thesis Seminar in Literature

3

Foreign Language Courses

Complete 1-first year sequence from the following languages:

Spanish

SPA-131

Spanish Language and Culture I

4

SPA-132

Spanish Language and Culture II

4

French

FRE-111

French Language and Culture I

4

FRE-112

French Language and Culture II

4

German

GER-121

German Language and Culture I

4

GER-122

German Language and Culture II

4

If available, students may study Latin or Greek. Equivalency tests must be agreed upon by both the Modern Foreign Language and English Departments. 

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Communicating clearly, persuasively and confidently in writing
  • Critically interpreting literature
  • Understanding and interpreting literature as a form of human imagination and expression
  • Understanding how the literary tradition has helped shape the world
  • Critical Thinking

English Teaching Certification

Students pursuing English as either their first or second teaching field, develop a program of study in consultation with both the faculty member in charge of secondary education and an advisor from the English Department. Such students must successfully complete following requirements:

Course Course Title Credits

ENG-446

Linguistics for Language Teachers (cross-listed -EDU/MFL)

3

Complete 6 credits from the following (limit of 1 JOURN course):

ENG-347

Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-498

Senior Thesis Seminar in Literature

3

JOURN-200

Principles and Practices of Journalism: Print

3

JOURN-300

Feature Writing

3

Creative Writing Major

Creative Writing Major

30 credits (Total does not include First-Year Seminar, ENG-100 or Foreign language courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG 200-level

Introduction to Literary Studies Courses

6

ENG-280

Theory and Methods of the Study of Literature

3

Complete 6 credits of 300-level seminar courses:

ENG-307

Origins and Traditions of English Literature

3

ENG-308

Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson

3

ENG-309

The Epic Tradition

3

ENG-315

The Supernatural in British Literature

3

ENG-316

The Brontės

3

ENG-317

Nineteenth-century British Fiction

3

ENG-318

Prize Books

3

ENG-319

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-320

Twentieth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-322

V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie

3

ENG-323

Postcolonial Studies

3

ENG-324

Narratives Against Oppression

3

ENG-325

Constructing World Literatures

3

ENG-329

Inventing America

3

ENG-330

African American Literature

3

ENG-331

Gardens of American Literature

3

ENG-332

Adrienne Rich

3

ENG-333

Hemingway & Faulkner

3

ENG-334

Ecopoetics

3

ENG-335

The American Renaissance

3

ENG-338

Postmodern Literature

 

200-Level Writing Workshops

Complete 6 credits from the following courses:

ENG-245

Poetry Writing Workshop

3

ENG-246

Fiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-247

Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

JOURN-200

Principles and Practices of Journalism: Print

3

Additional Writing and Seminar Requirements

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG-345

Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop

3

ENG-346

Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-347

Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

OR

Complete 3 credits from the following:

ENG-345

Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop

3

ENG-346

Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-347

Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

AND

ENG-SEM

One 300-Level Literature Seminar Course

3

Capstone

ENG-496

Creative Writing Capstone Seminar

 3

Foreign Language Courses

Complete 1-first year sequence from the following languages:

Spanish

SPA-131

Spanish Language and Culture I

4

SPA-132

Spanish Language and Culture II

4

French

FRE-111

French Language and Culture I

4

FRE-112

French Language and Culture II

4

German

GER-121

German Language and Culture I

4

GER-122

German Language and Culture II

4

If available, students may study Latin or Greek. Equivalency tests must be agreed upon by both the Modern Foreign Language and English Departments. 

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Communicate clearly, persuasively, and confidently in writing
  • Critically interpret literature
  • Understand and interpret literature as a form of human imagination and expression
  • Understand how literary traditions are informed by and reflect and shape the world
  • Critical Thinking

Associated Majors

Environmental Studies Major

Students pursuing an ES major complete all of the Core courses plus six to eight courses comprising a disciplinary Focus. Students are encouraged to complete some courses in the Core before beginning coursework toward the Focus. Students should consult an ES advisor for assistance with planning a course of study. Students wishing to substitute a second major for the Focus area must submit a formal, written request to the ES Chair to be considered by the ES Committee. Given the deeply interdisciplinary nature of the ES Core and the in-depth study involved in the Focus area, students completing the ES major, an additional three credits in the Fine Arts, and six additional credits in the Social Sciences* have fulfilled three PEAKs: Humanities & Fine Arts; Social Sciences & History; and Natural Sciences & Mathematics.

Major Requirements: the Environmental Studies Core (36 credits)

The Environmental Studies Core introduces essential concepts in environmental studies, foundational approaches to the study of the environment, and the specific ways in which environmental studies are practiced in various disciplines. Courses in the Core should be taken as early as possible.

*Students participating in the Winter Wilderness Experience (WWE) can fulfill 3 of the 6 required Social Science elective credits.

Environmental Studies Major

58-60 credits depending on Focus area (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Core Requirements

ENV-200 or
IND-305.1/305.2

Nature and Culture: Introduction to Environmental Studies or
Winter Wilderness Experience Prep/Winter Wilderness Exp.

3
6

Environment, Ecology, and Natural Systems

BIO-140

Idaho Natural History and Laboratory

4

ENV-160

Environmental Science I and Laboratory

4

ENV-260

Environmental Science II and Laboratory

4

Analytical and Quantitative Skills

MAT-125 or
MAT-212

Data Analysis and Statistics or
Advanced Statistical Methods

3

Environmental Thought in the United States

ENG-239

Visions of Environment

3

Global Perspective on Environment

ATH-309

Cross-Cultural Approaches to the Environment

3

Public Policy and the Environment

POE-339 or
POE-389

Environmental Policy Analysis or
Ecological Economics

3

Values and the Environment

PHI-340

Environmental Philosophy

3

REL-348 or
REL-349

Religion and Science or
Religion and Nature

3

Senior Capstone Integrative Seminar

ENV-402

Senior Capstone

3

Understanding the biology of organisms, populations, and ecosystems is essential to addressing environmental issues. The ability to collect and interpret biological data reliably and to gather and interpret relevant scientific literature allows for the critical evaluation of ecological issues and contributes to sound environmental decision making. In the Conservation Biology Focus, students gain both a conceptual framework and the laboratory and field experience needed to understand the biological aspects of environmental issues.

Conservation Biology Focus

Course Course Title Credits

Focus Requirements

BIO-201

Molecules to Cells and Laboratory

4

BIO-202

Organismal Biology and Laboratory

4

BIO-306

Conservation Biology

3

ENV-350/350L

Geographic Information Systems and Laboratory

3

Complete 1 Systematics course from the following:

BIO-319

Ichthyology and Laboratory

4

BIO-322

Field Botany and Laboratory

4

BIO-339

Mammalogy and Laboratory

4

BIO-349

Vertebrate Natural History and Laboratory

4

Complete 1 Ecology course from the following:

BIO-317

Stream Ecology and Laboratory

4

BIO-326

Coastal Marine Ecology and Laboratory

4

BIO-345

Ecology and Laboratory

4

BIO-346.1 and
BIO-346

Field Biology Preparation and
Field Biology

2

4

Recommended course (but not required):

MAT-212

Advanced Statistical Methods

3

All human activity depends upon energy, chemical systems, and the earth's elemental cycles, and our dependence upon these systems has had profound effects on our environment. The water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles, for example, reflect the impact of human activity. Addressing environmental problems from a chemical perspective necessitates generating data about the properties of chemical systems, interpreting those data, and understanding the study of matter. In the Chemistry Focus, students study techniques for chemical analysis, the complexities of matter, the earth's elemental cycles, and electrochemistry, and gain experience conducting chemical analyses and interpreting scientific data. The Chemistry Focus provides students with a solid base of coursework that enables exploration of crucial concerns affecting the physical environment.

Chemistry Focus

Course Course Title Credits

Focus Requirements

CHE-141

General Chemistry I and Laboratory

4

CHE-142

General Chemistry II and Laboratory

4

CHE-252

Analytical Chemistry I and Laboratory

4

CHE-301

Organic Chemistry I and Laboratory

4

CHE-302

Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory
(CHE-412/412L or CHE-420/420L can substitute for this course)

4

CHE-352

Analytical Chemistry II and Laboratory

4

Our values, beliefs, and language relate deeply to environmental issues and attitudes. Similarly, the human imagination and the stories that we tell ourselves reflect and affect the physical environment. Studying the literary tradition allows us to reflect on historical assumptions and understandings about how humans relate to their world. In the Literature Focus, students examine the British, American, and World literary traditions, and study theories concerning how literature makes meaning for readers.

Literature Focus

Course Course Title Credits

Focus Requirements

ENG-280

Theory and Methods of the Study of Literature

3

ENG-498

Senior Thesis Seminar in Literature

3

 

 

Complete 1 course from the following:

ENG-245

Poetry Writing Workshop

3

ENG-246

Fiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-247

Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

 

 

Complete 12 credits of upper division (300-level) Literature Seminar Courses from

the following:

 

ENG

One Course in American Literature

3

ENG

One Course in English Literature before 1789

3

ENG

One Course in English Literature after 1789

3

ENG

One Course in World Literature

3

With the increasing power of modern science and technology to affect nature, reflections upon the place of humanity in the universe have taken on special urgency. These reflections include questions about the limits of scientific knowledge, the ethical obligations of humans to non-human life and the environment, and technology's impact on humanity's self-understanding. The Philosophy Focus enables a student to examine these and other issues thoughtfully by introducing the most important ideas in Western philosophy and developing students' abilities in critical analysis, argumentation, and presentation.

Philosophy Focus

Course Course Title Credits

Focus Requirements

PHI-214

Introduction to Logic

3

PHI-310

Ancient Philosophy

3

PHI-311

Modern Philosophy

3

PHI-331

Ethics

3

PHI-498

Philosophy Seminar

1-4

PHI/REL

Upper-Division non-western Philosophy or Religion course

3

The study of the environment requires an understanding of natural systems and of values, beliefs and language. The application of this knowledge can lead to important social and environmental change. The Political Economy Focus, which emphasizes public policy, allows Environmental Studies majors to apply their knowledge to affect substantive change to their communities, regions, and society. A thorough comprehension of political and economic systems, philosophies, and methods is critical for students to become influential members of society.

Political Economy Focus

Course Course Title Credits

Focus Requirements

POE-241

Introduction to Public Policy

3

POE-250

Introduction to Political Philosophy

3

POE-263

Introduction to Political Economy

3

POE-299

Evidence, Proof and Knowledge

3

POE-498

Senior Seminar: Politics and Economics

3

Complete 2 upper-division (300 or 400-level) courses in Political Economy (at least one course should have an international emphasis):

POE ELECT

Upper-Division Courses ( POE ES Core course not included)

6

 

Self-Designed Focus

Course Course Title Credits

Focus Requirements

Students may design a Focus in consultation with an ES advisor. All self-designed Foci must include in-depth study within a single field or discipline and at least 10 upper-division units, and must be approved by the ES Program Committee by the end of the junior year. If you are interested in designing a Focus, see your ES advisor or the Chair of the ES Program.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Environmental Studies major, students should be able to:

  • Question their own cultural and environmental attitudes and examine these values in their lives and work.
  • Think critically and interdisciplinary about environmental issues.
  • Gather and analyze data to answer environmental questions
  • Communicate effectively (oral and written format) about the environment.
  • Actively engage in their communities to foster environmental stewardship.

Minors

Literature in English Minor

18 credits (Total does not include First-Year Seminar or ENG-100 courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG 200-level

Introduction to Literary Studies Courses

6

Complete 6 credits of 300-level seminar courses:

ENG-307

Origins and Traditions of English Literature

3

ENG-308

Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson

3

ENG-309

The Epic Tradition

3

ENG-315

The Supernatural in British Literature

3

ENG-316

The Brontės

3

ENG-317

Nineteenth-century British Fiction

3

ENG-318

Prize Books

3

ENG-319

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-320

Twentieth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-322

V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie

3

ENG-324

Narratives Against Oppression

3

ENG-325

Constructing World Literatures

3

ENG-329

Inventing America

3

ENG-330

African American Literature

3

ENG-331

Gardens of American Literature

3

ENG-332

Adrienne Rich

3

ENG-333

Hemingway & Faulkner

3

ENG-334

Ecopoetics

3

ENG-335

The American Renaissance

3

ENG-338

Postmodern Literature

3

Complete 3 credits from the following:

ENG-280

Theory and Methods of the Study of Literature

3

ENG-SEM

One additional 300-Level English Seminar Course

3

Fine Arts Course Requirement

Choose 3 credits from the following subject areas:

ART

Art

3

MUS

Music

3

THE

Theatre

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Communicating clearly, persuasively and confidently in writing
  • Critically interpreting literature
  • Understanding and interpreting literature as a form of human imagination and expression
  • Understanding how the literary tradition has helped shape the world
  • Critical Thinking

Note: Students who wish to be certified to teach English as the secondary level may need to take additional courses in English. Please consult with a faculty member in the Education Department to learn the current requirements for certification.

Creative Writing Minor

18 credits (Total does not include First-Year Seminar or ENG-100 courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete 6 credits (2 courses) from the following:

ENG 200-level

Introduction to Literary Studies Courses

6

Complete 3 credits of 300-level seminar courses:

ENG-307

Origins and Traditions of English Literature

3

ENG-309

The Epic Tradition

3

ENG-315

The Supernatural in British Literature

3

ENG-316

The Brontės

3

ENG-317

Nineteenth-century British Fiction

3

ENG-318

Prize Books

3

ENG-319

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-320

Twentieth-century Literature of the British Isles

3

ENG-322

V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie

3

ENG-323

Postcolonial Studies

3

ENG-324

Narratives Against Oppression

3

ENG-325

Constructing World Literatures

3

ENG-329

Inventing America

3

ENG-330

African American Literature

3

ENG-331

Gardens of American Literature

3

ENG-332

Adrienne Rich

3

ENG-333

Hemingway & Faulkner

3

ENG-334

Ecopoetics

3

ENG-335

The American Renaissance

3

ENG-338

Postmodern Literature

3

ENG-341

Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson

3

200-Level Writing Workshops

Complete 3 credits from the following courses:

ENG-245

Poetry Writing Workshop

3

ENG-246

Fiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-247

Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

JOURN-200

Principles and Practices of Journalism: Print

3

 

300-Level Writing Workshops

 

Complete 3 credits from the following:

ENG-345

Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop

3

ENG-346

Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop

3

ENG-347

Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

Fine Arts Course Requirement

Choose 3 credits from the following subject areas:

ART

Art

3

MUS

Music

3

THE

Theatre

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Communicate clearly, persuasively and confidently in writing
  • Critically interpret literature
  • Understand and interpret literature as a form of human imagination and expression
  • Understand literary traditions are informed by and reflect and shape the world
  • Critical Thinking

Call it "the first draft of history," the engine of the communication revolution, or the literature of fact, journalism performs an ever-increasing role in the twenty-first century. Online and interactive journalism have made journalism more immediate, personal, and democratic than ever before. Yet the essential tools and techniques of nonfiction and journalistic writing remain remarkably unchanged. The Interactive Journalism minor combines the resources of the college in art, photography and traditional liberal arts disciplines with coursework in journalism. Internships in real world media businesses give College of Idaho journalism minors a sense of what is happening in the workplace.

Present in all our coursework is a focus on critical thinking and exposure to the best examples of nonfiction writing for print, websites, radio and television. All minors are expected to work for The Coyote student newspaper and the CofI Online—our college online publication for The College of Idaho community that includes articles and artwork, creative nonfiction, poetry and short fiction, and also publishes our capstone projects. The goal of the minor in Interactive Journalism is to produce journalists who possess the skills and critical thinking ability to work in today's media. The means—broadcast, print, Internet—of distributing news have evolved; the method of gathering and interpreting information has quickened, but the essence of the work—the informed, well-researched and compellingly told story—remains at the heart of all good journalism. Our students benefit from an inter-disciplinary approach, taking courses in ethics, graphic and web design, a required capstone project as well as a core curriculum in journalism. Internships in print, video or interactive media give the students hands-on experience off campus.

The Interactive Journalism minor is a comprehensive minor that fulfills the Humanities & Fine Arts and Professional Studies PEAKs. It requires that students consider aesthetic, philosophical, and artistic aims in the study of communication.

Interactive Journalism Minor

28-30 credits (Total does not include First-Year Seminar or ENG-100 courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

JOURN-200

Principles & Practices of Journalism: Print

3

JOURN-201

Principles & Practices of Journalism: Visual

3

JOURN-299T

Special Topics (any version)

1

JOURN-300 or
ENG 347

Feature Writing or
Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

JOURN-301

Advanced Editing and Reporting

3

JOURN-400

Senior Project

3

JOURN-497

Internship

1-3

PHI-331

Ethics

3

Complete 3 credits from the following courses:

ART-107

Digital Imaging

3

ART-108

Introduction to Web Design

3

ART-201

Visual Communication I

3

ART-202

Visual Communication II

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical Thinking
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Problem Solving
  • Written Communication
  • Journalism minors should demonstrate the ability to research, report and edit according to professional standards. They are expected to be proficient nonfiction writers and understand the history of the field. They need to apply ethical standards in their reporting, interviewing and show that they can do thorough and thoughtful research for articles. In addition they must demonstrate an understanding of the methods and uses of multimedia in journalism today.

The Journalism minor presents the fundamentals of the profession. Classes introduce the student to the history of the profession, examine ethical questions that journalists confront and explore the remarkable transformation that contemporary media are undergoing. Each student minoring in journalism is expected to develop a capstone project, contribute to campus publications and complete an internship. Working journalists regularly visit the classes to share their experiences. All the courses are writing intensive and include both a presentation of research and reporting as well as a portfolio of papers.

Journalism Minor

16-18 credits (Total does not include First-Year Seminar or ENG-100 courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

JOURN-200

Principles & Practices of Journalism: Print

3

JOURN-201

Principles & Practices of Journalism: Visual

3

JOURN-300 or
ENG 347

Feature Writing or
Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

3

JOURN-301

Advanced Editing and Reporting

3

JOURN-401

Senior Project

3

JOURN-497

Internship

1-3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical Thinking
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Problem Solving
  • Written Communication

Journalism minors should demonstrate the ability to research, report and edit according to professional standards. They are expected to be proficient nonfiction writers and understand the history of the field. They need to apply ethical standards in their reporting, interviewing and show that they can do thorough and thoughtful research for articles. In addition they must demonstrate an understanding of the methods and uses of multimedia in journalism today.

Associated Minors

Criminal Justice Studies Minor
Humanities and Fine Arts PEAK

18 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

IND-368

The Prison Experience

5

SOC-494*

Independent Study

1

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG-219

Thief-making and Thief Taking

3

ENG-226

Postmodernism and Human Rights Activism

3

ENG-232

Literature and Slavery

3

ENG-235

Prose and Cons

3

ENG-324

Narratives Against Oppression

3

PHI-331

Ethics

3

SOC-497

Internship

1-3

Additional Fine Arts Course

Complete 3 credits from the following subject areas:

ART

Art

3

MUS

Music

3

THE

Theatre

3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical thinking about the field from a number of disciplinary perspectives
  • Analytical reasoning applied to crime and prison related arguments
  • Problem solving in regards to social, political economy and humanitarian issues
  • Written communication through intensive journals, research and response papers
  • First-hand experience visiting adult & juvenile correctional facilities
  • Opportunities to explore criminal justice-related professions

* Six weeks before graduation, students will submit a portfolio of relevant work completed for the minor, such as exams and papers, including a two-page essay describing important academic lessons and skills acquired in this minor.

Criminal Justice Studies Minor
Social Science and History PEAK

18 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS  

IND-368

The Prison Experience

5

SOC-330

Criminology and Deviance

3

SOC-494*

Independent Study

1

Choose 9 credits from the following:

ATH-202

Cultural Diversity

3

ATH-302A

Cultural Diversity

3

EDU-300

Schools and Society

3

POE-241

Introduction to Public Policy

3

PSY-404

Abnormal Psychology

3

PSY-407

Introduction to Forensic Psychology

3

SOC-360

Race and Ethnic Relations

3

SOC-349

Social Stratification

3

SOC-497

Internship

1-3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical thinking about the field from a number of disciplinary perspectives
  • Analytical reasoning applied to crime and prison related arguments
  • Problem solving in regards to social, political economy and humanitarian issues
  • Written communication through intensive journals, research and response papers
  • First-hand experience visiting adult & juvenile correctional facilities
  • Opportunities to explore criminal justice-related professions

Criminal Justice Studies Minor
Professional Studies and Enhancements PEAK

18 credits (Total does not include prerequisite courses)

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

IND-368

The Prison Experience

5

SOC-330

Criminology and Deviance

3

SOC-494*

Independent Study

1

 

 

Complete 9 credits from the following:

 

BUS-391

The Legal Environment

3

CHE-124

Forensic Chemistry and Laboratory

3

EDU-300

Schools and Society

3

POE-241

Introduction to Public Policy

3

PSY-407

Introduction to Forensic Psychology

3

SOC-497

Internship

1-3

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Critical thinking about the field from a number of disciplinary perspectives
  • Analytical reasoning applied to crime and prison related arguments
  • Problem solving in regards to social, political economy and humanitarian issues
  • Written communication through intensive journals, research and response papers
  • First-hand experience visiting adult & juvenile correctional facilities
  • Opportunities to explore criminal justice-related professions

Asian Studies Minor
Humanities & Fine Arts PEAK

16 credits

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete a Major outside the Humanities & Fine Arts PEAK

Complete the following:

ASN-494

Independent Study*

1

Complete 9 credits from the following:

ENG-225

Asia through its Movies

3

ENG-233

The Literature of Immigrants

3

ENG-324

Narratives against Oppression

3

ENG-325

Constructing World Literatures

3

REL-203

Buddhism

3

REL-300

Zen

3

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ASN-302.1

Southeast Asia: Traditions and Transitions

2

ASN-302.2

Southeast Asia: Traditions and Transitions

4

HIS-210

History of Modern East Asia

3

HIS-338

Modern India

3

HIS-340

Pre-Modern Chinese History

3

HIS-343

Religion and the State in Late Imperial China

3

HIS-345

Modern China

3

HIS-354

History of Southeast Asia

3

HIS-357

Popular Culture in Modern Chinese

3

HIS-384

Modern Japan

3

POE-321

Comparative Economics

3

POE-370

Political Economy of China

3

POE-371

Political Economy of Japan

3

POE-374

Political Economy of Southeast Asia

3

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Critical Thinking
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Problem Solving
  • Written Communication
  • Acquire a basic familiarity with major traditions and themes in the study of Asia across at least three disciplines
  • Think comparatively about at least three different regions of Asia
  • Demonstrate an ability to write thoughtfully and persuasively about Asia's diverse cultures and history  

*Note: ASN-494 Independent Study minors must expand a paper they have written for one of their ASN related courses. These "starred papers" will be graded on a pass/fail basis by the faculty member who originally supervised the project and should constitute a polished piece of work that serves as the student's highest achievement in the minor.

Asian Studies Minor
Social Science & History PEAK

16 credits

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete a Major outside the Social Science & History PEAK

Complete the following:

ASN-494

Independent Study *

1

Complete 9 credits from the following:

ASN-302.1

Southeast Asia: Traditions and Transitions

2

ASN-302.2

Southeast Asia: Traditions and Transitions

4

HIS-210

History of Modern East Asia

3

HIS-338

Modern India

3

HIS-340

Pre-Modern Chinese History

3

HIS-343

Religion and the State in Late Imperial China

3

HIS-345

Modern China

3

HIS-354

History of Southeast Asia

3

HIS-357

Popular Culture in Modern Chinese

3

HIS-384

Modern Japan

3

POE-321

Comparative Economics

3

POE-370

Political Economy of China

3

POE-371

Political Economy of Japan

3

POE-374

Political Economy of Southeast Asia

3

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG-225

Asia Through its Movies

3

ENG-233

The Literature of Immigrants

3

ENG-323

Postcolonial Studies

3

ENG-324

Narratives against Oppression

3

ENG-325

Constructing World Literatures

3

PHI-367

Buddhist Philosophy

3

REL-203

Buddhism

3

REL-300

Zen

3

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Critical Thinking
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Problem Solving
  • Written Communication
  • Acquire a basic familiarity with major traditions and themes in the study of Asia across at least three disciplines
  • Think comparatively about at least three different regions of Asia
  • Demonstrate an ability to write thoughtfully and persuasively about Asia's diverse cultures and history  

*Note: ASN-494 Independent Study minors must expand a paper they have written for one of their ASN related courses. These "starred papers" will be graded on a pass/fail basis by the faculty member who originally supervised the project and should constitute
a polished piece of work that serves as the student's highest achievement in the minor.

British Studies Minor
Humanities & Fine Arts PEAK

15-16 credits

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete 1 starred paper *

Complete 9 credits from the following (200-level Intro. to Literary Studies must taken before enrolling in 300-level course in British Literature):

ENG-210

Shakespearean Comedy

3

ENG-211

Weird Shakespeare

3

ENG-212

Introduction to Shakespeare

3

ENG-218

World War I and Modern Literature

3

ENG-219

Thief making and Thief taking

3

ENG-307

Origins and Traditions of English Literature *

3

ENG-308

Marlowe, Shakespeare and Jonson*

3

ENG-315

Ghosties and Ghoulies*

3

ENG-316

The Brontes*

3

ENG-317

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Fiction*

3

ENG-319

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Isles*

3

ENG-320

Twentieth-century Literature of the British Isles*

3

ENG-322

V. S. Naipaul and Salmon Rushdie*

3

IND-307

London (7 Credits of IND 307 count towards the British Studies PEAK)

3

MUS-308

Performing Britannia and Celtica: The Music of Britain*

3

Complete 6 credits from the following:

HIS-311

To Kill a King: The English Civil War*

3

HIS-350

The British Empire 1759-1960*

3

HIS-352

England to 1688*

3

HIS-353

Modern Britain*

3

HIS-399T.2

Tudor England

3

IND-307

London (7 Credits of IND 307 count towards the British Studies PEAK)

3

IND-320

Scotland and the Lake District

3

Complete 3 credits of Fine Arts coursework through the following:

IND-307

London

3

IND-320

Scotland and the Lake District

3

MUS-308

Performing Britannia and Celtica: The Music of Britain

3

ART

Art Elective

3

MUS

Music Elective

3

THE

Theatre Elective

3

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Critical Thinking: Demonstrate an understanding of how historical and cultural contexts of the British Isles inform and influence specific events or creative expressions.
  • Analytical Reasoning: Demonstrate an understanding of what areas and forms of inquiry are considered meaningful in British Studies through framing relevant research questions. Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources through the lenses of British Studies
  • Problem Solving: independently locate and apply pertinent scholarship on British history, literature, or music to meaningful research questions in British Studies
  • Written Communication: Present an original argument in a thesis-driven, well-organized, and clearly written essay with clear results supported by relevant scholarship.

* Note: For a "starred paper" students must expand a paper they have written for one of their ENG or MUS British Studies courses. These will graded on a pass/fail basis by the faculty member who originally supervised the project and should constitute a polished piece of work that serves as the student's highest achievement in the minor

British Studies Minor
Social Science & History PEAK

15 - 18 credits

Course Course Title Credits

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Complete 1 starred paper**

Complete 9 credits from the following (200-level Intro. to Literary Studies must taken before enrolling in 300-level course in British Literature):

HIS-311

To Kill a King: The English Civil War*

3

HIS-350

The British Empire 1756-1960*

3

HIS-352

England to 1688*

3

HIS-353

Modern Britain*

3

HIS-399T.2

Tudor England

3

IND-307

London (7 Credits of IND 307 count towards the British Studies PEAK)

3

Complete 6 credits from the following:

ENG-210

Shakespeare Comedy

3

ENG-212

Introduction of Shakespeare

3

ENG-218

World War I and Modern Literature

3

ENG-219

Thief making and Thief taking

3

ENG-307

Origins and Traditions of English Literature*

3

ENG-308

Marlowe, Shakespeare and Jonson

3

ENG-315

Ghosties and Ghoulies*

3

ENG-316

The Brontes*

3

ENG-317

Nineteenth-century British Fiction*

3

ENG-319

Nineteenth-century Literature of the British Isles*

3

ENG-320

Twentieth-century Literature of the British Isles*

3

ENG-322

V. S. Naipaul and Salmon Rushdie*

3

IND-307

London ( 7 Credits of IND 307 count towards the British Studies PEAK)

3

IND-320

Scotland & The Lake District

3

MUS-308

Performing Britannia and Celtica: The Music of Britain

3

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Critical Thinking: Demonstrate an understanding of how historical and cultural contexts of the British Isles inform and influence specific events or creative expressions.
  • Analytical Reasoning: Demonstrate an understanding of what areas and forms of inquiry are considered meaningful in British Studies through framing relevant research questions. Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources through the lenses of British Studies
  • Problem Solving: independently locate and apply pertinent scholarship on British history, literature, or music to meaningful research questions in British Studies
  • Written Communication: Present an original argument in a thesis-driven, well-organized, and clearly written essay with clear results supported by relevant scholarship. 

* Note: For a "starred paper" students must expand a paper they have written for one of their HIS British Studies related courses. These will be graded on a pass/fail basis by the faculty member who originally supervised the project and should constitute a polished piece of work that serves as the student's highest achievement in the minor.